Search results for 'Israel Rosenfield' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Israel Rosenfield (2000). Consciousness and Subjectivity: Memory, Language and the "Body Image". Intellectica 31:111-123.score: 240.0
  2. Stanley Shostak (2012). DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule That Shook the World. By Israel Rosenfield, Edward Ziff, and Borin van Loon. The European Legacy 17 (5):711 - 712.score: 150.0
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 5, Page 711-712, August 2012.
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  3. Jonathan I. Israel (2006/2008). Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man, 1670-1752. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The first major reassessment of the Western Enlightenment for a generation. Continuing the story he began in Radical Enlightenment, Jonathan Israel now focuses on the first half of the eighteenth century. He traces to their roots the core principles of Western modernity: the primacy of reason, democracy, racial equality, feminism, religious toleration, sexual emancipation, and freedom of expression.
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  4. Jonathan I. Israel (2001). Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity, 1650-1750. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In the wake of the Scientific Revolution, the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the complete demolition of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief by the new philosophy and the philosophes, including Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. The Radical Enlightenment played a part in this revolutionary process, which effectively overthrew all justification for monarchy, aristocracy, and ecclesiastical power, as well as man's dominance over woman, theological dominance of education, and slavery. Despite the present day interest in the revolutions of (...)
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  5. Jonathan I. Israel (2011). Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights 1750-1790. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    That the Enlightenment shaped modernity is uncontested. Yet remarkably few historians or philosophers have attempted to trace the process of ideas from the political and social turmoil of the late eighteenth century to the present day. This is precisely what Jonathan Israel now does. In Democratic Enlightenment , Israel demonstrates that the Enlightenment was an essentially revolutionary process, driven by philosophical debate. The American Revolution and its concerns certainly acted as a major factor in the intellectual ferment that (...)
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  6. Jonathan Israel (2014). “Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850). Diametros 40:73-98.score: 60.0
    “Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical Enlightenment” was (...)
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  7. M. Israel (2001). Minimizers, Maximizers and the Rhetoric of Scalar Reasoning. Journal of Semantics 18 (4):297-331.score: 60.0
    This paper examines the lexicalization patterns of polarity items with a view to understanding the range of possible polarity items and the reasons why such forms should exist in the first place. My starting point is the Scalar Model of Polarity (Israel 1996, 1998), which predicts a reliable correlation between a polarity item's sensitivity and its scalar semantic properties: specifically, it predicts that forms denoting a minimal scalar degree may be emphatic negative polarity items (NPIs), while forms denoting maximal (...)
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  8. Rami Israel (2009). A New View on Inductive Practices. VDM Verlag.score: 60.0
    The idea that reason can justify induction was famously criticized by David Hume. Hume concluded that there is no rational justification for inductive inferences and hence, no rational justification for most of our daily beliefs. Many philosophers attempted to solve Hume's problem with no success. Bertrand Russell commented regarding Hume's problem: "[if we cannot justify induction] we have no reason to expect the sun to rise tomorrow, to expect bread to be more nourishing than a stone, or to expect that (...)
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  9. Rami Israel (2004). Two Interpretations of ‘Grue’– or How to Misunderstand the New Riddle of Induction. Analysis 64 (284):335–339.score: 30.0
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  10. David J. Israel & John Perry (1990). What is Information? In Philip P. Hanson (ed.), Information, Language and Cognition. University of British Columbia Press.score: 30.0
  11. David Israel & John Perry (1996). Where Monsters Dwell. In Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation. Csli Publications, Stanford. 1--303.score: 30.0
    Kaplan says that monsters violate Principle 2 of his theory. Principle 2 is that indexicals, pure and demonstrative alike, are directly referential. In providing this explanation of there being no monsters, Kaplan feels his theory has an advantage over double-indexing theories like Kamp’s or Segerberg’s (or Stalnaker’s), which either embrace monsters or avoid them only by ad hoc stipulation, in the sharp conceptual distinction it draws between circumstances of evaluation and contexts of utterance. We shall argue that Kaplan’s prohibition is (...)
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  12. John Perry & David J. Israel (1991). Fodor and Psychological Explanation. In Barry M. Loewer & Georges Rey (eds.), Meaning in Mind: Fodor and His Critics. Blackwell.score: 30.0
    [In Meaning in Mind, edited by Barry Loewer and Georges Rey. Oxford: Basil Black- well, 1991, 165.
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  13. W. Israel (1984). Does a Cosmic Censor Exist? Foundations of Physics 14 (11):1049-1059.score: 30.0
    A distinction is drawn between the event horizon conjecture (EHC), the conjecture that an event horizon forms in a gravitational collapse, and cosmic censorship, the idea that every singularity which develops in the course of collapse must be enclosed within a horizon. It is argued that a body of circumstantial evidence seems to favor EHC, but cosmic censorship seems contraindicated.
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  14. Johan van Benthem, Maricarmen Martinez, David Israel & John Perry, The Stories of Logic and Information.score: 30.0
    Information is a notion of wide use and great intuitive appeal, and hence, not surprisingly, different formal paradigms claim part of it, from Shannon channel theory to Kolmogorov complexity. Information is also a widely used term in logic, but a similar diversity repeats itself: there are several competing logical accounts of this notion, ranging from semantic to syntactic. In this chapter, we will discuss three major logical accounts of information.
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  15. Rami Israel (2006). Projectibility and Explainability or How to Draw a New Picture of Inductive Practices. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (2):269 - 286.score: 30.0
    Goodman published his "riddle" in the middle of the 20th century and many philosophers have attempted to solve it. These attempts almost all shared an assumption that, I shall argue, might be wrong, namely, the assumption that when we project from cases we have examined to cases we have not, what we project are predicates (and that this projectibility is an absolute property of some predicates). I shall argue that this assumption, shared by almost all attempts at a solution, looks (...)
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  16. Werner Israel (1996). Imploding Stars, Shifting Continents, and the Inconstancy of Matter. Foundations of Physics 26 (5):595-616.score: 30.0
    Two revolutionary concepts of the twentieth century—continental drift and the existence of superdense stars and black holes—had extended histories which ran in curious parallel for five decades. Between the wars each encountered a fierce and emotionally charged resistance which may have had a common psychological root. Each threatened man's instinctive faith in the permanence of matter.
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  17. Jonathan Irvine Israel (2006). Enlightenment! Which Enlightenment? Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (3):523-545.score: 30.0
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  18. David Israel, John Perry & Syun Tutiya (1993). Executions, Motivations, and Accomplishments. Philosophical Review 102 (4):515-540.score: 30.0
    Brutus wanted to kill Caesar. He believed that Caesar was an ordinary mortal, and that, given this, stabbing him (by which we mean plunging a knife into his heart) was a way of killing him. He thought that he could stab Caesar, for he remembered that he had a knife and saw that Caesar was standing next to him on his left, in the Forum. So Brutus was motivated to stab the man to his left. He did so, thereby killing (...)
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  19. David Israel (2002). Reflections on Gödel's and Gandy's Reflections on Turing's Thesis. Minds and Machines 12 (2):181-201.score: 30.0
    We sketch the historical and conceptual context of Turing's analysis of algorithmic or mechanical computation. We then discuss two responses to that analysis, by Gödel and by Gandy, both of which raise, though in very different ways. The possibility of computation procedures that cannot be reduced to the basic procedures into which Turing decomposed computation. Along the way, we touch on some of Cleland's views.
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  20. David Israel & John Perry, Information and Architecture.score: 30.0
    The fact referred to we call the signal or indicating fact. The thermometer is the carrier, the property of containing mercury that has risen past 98.6 is the indicating property. The proposition that Elwood has a fever is the incremental informational content of the signal. The property of having a fever is the indicated property; Elwood is the subject matter. A signal has incremental content, given a connecting fact and relative to a constraint. 1 In this case, the connecting fact (...)
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  21. Lorraine Daston, Anthony Grafton, Jonathan Israel & Donald R. Kelley (2004). Historians Look at the New Histories of Philosophy. Teaching New Histories of Philosophy:361-388.score: 30.0
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  22. M. Israel (1996). Polarity Sensitivity as Lexical Semantics. Linguistics and Philosophy 19 (6):619 - 666.score: 30.0
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  23. Jonathan Israel (2002). Review of Etienne Bonnot de Condillac, Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge, Translated and Edited by Hans Aarsleff. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (5).score: 30.0
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  24. Johan van Benthem & David Israel (1999). Information Flow: The Logic of Distributed Systems, Jon Barwise and Jerry Seligman. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 8 (3):390-397.score: 30.0
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  25. David J. Israel (1991). Katz and Postal on Realism. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (5):567 - 574.score: 30.0
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  26. David S. Katz, Jonathan I. Israel & Richard H. Popkin (eds.) (1990). Sceptics, Millenarians, and Jews. E.J. Brill.score: 30.0
    The essays in this volume are a contribution to this process of reappraisal, focusing specifically on the phenomena of scepticism and millenarianism, especially ...
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  27. Peter Aczel, David Israel, Yosuhiro Katagiri & Stanley Peters (eds.) (1993). Situation Theory and its Applications Vol. Csli.score: 30.0
    Situation Theory and Its Applications, Vol. 1 . Robin Cooper, Kuniaki Mukai, and John Perry (Eds.). Lecture Notes No. 22. ...
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  28. J. Israel (1981). Cultural Relativism and the Logic of Language. Diogenes 29 (113-114):107-126.score: 30.0
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  29. Lawrence Rosenfield (2000). Rhetoric Reclaimed: Aristotle and the Liberal Arts Tradition (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (1):94-96.score: 30.0
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  30. Leonora Cohen Rosenfield (1973). A Short-Title List of Subject Dictionaries of the Sixteenth, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries as Aids to the History of Ideas (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (3):411-413.score: 30.0
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  31. Jon Barwise, Solomon Feferman & David Israel (1986). Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic: Stanford, California, 1985. Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (3):832-862.score: 30.0
  32. Lawrence W. Rosenfield (1965). The Doctrine of the Mean in Aristotle's Rhetoric. Theoria 31 (3):191-198.score: 30.0
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  33. Jonathan Israel (2013). The Battle Over Confucius and Classical Chinese Philosophy in European Early Enlightenment Thought (1670−1730). Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (2):183-198.score: 30.0
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  34. Jonathan Israel (2008). The History Man. The Philosophers' Magazine 43 (43):78-82.score: 30.0
    I’m one of the biggest enemies of analytical philosophy there are. I think it’s a complete waste of time. I think it’s even a contradiction in terms to imagine that there can be a real philosophy which answers to basic universal human questions and values, which is not historically based. It’s an idea that doesn’t make sense, even if some people hold it.
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  35. Lawrence William Rosenfield (2006). Rhetorical Landscapes in America: Variations on a Theme From Kenneth Burke (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 39 (2):172-173.score: 30.0
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  36. David J. Israel (1988). Bogdan on Information: Commentary. Mind and Language 3 (2):123-140.score: 30.0
  37. Jonathan Israel (2004). Philosophy, History of Philosophy, and l'Histoire de l'Esprit Humain. Teaching New Histories of Philosophy:329-344.score: 30.0
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  38. Lawrence William Rosenfield (1971). Aristotle and Information Theory. The Hague,Mouton.score: 30.0
  39. Allan Rosenfield (1980). Depo‐Provera: Contraceptive Risk? Hastings Center Report 10 (2):4-4.score: 30.0
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  40. Leonora Cohen Rosenfield (1974). Le Physicien Ignace Gaston Pardies S. J. (1636-1673) (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (2):258-260.score: 30.0
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  41. Giorgio Israel (1998). L'idea di rivoluzione scientifica e le tendenze recenti della storiografia della scienza. Rivista di Filosofia 89 (1):113-138.score: 30.0
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  42. Allan G. Rosenfield & Susan C. M. Scrimshaw (1976). Culture and Contraceptives. Hastings Center Report 6 (2):4-43.score: 30.0
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  43. Daniel K. Rosenfield (2009). Rethinking Cyber War. Critical Review 21 (1):77-90.score: 30.0
    ABSTRACT Cybernetic attacks have been wrongly perceived as weapons of physical destruction rather than of disruption. Because modern, post?industrial societies have become critically dependent on computer networks to function on a day?to?day basis, disruption of those networks could have serious social and economic consequences. In order to better protect society, policymakers will have to re?orient their approach toward cyber security so as to emphasize the genuine cybernetic threat, which is network disruption rather than physical destruction.
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  44. Marla Susman Israel & Whitney M. Marks (2011). Federal Accountability And Compliance. Teaching Ethics 12 (1):113-140.score: 30.0
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  45. David Israel (1987). Review: M. J. Cresswell, Structured Meanings: The Semantics of Propositional Attitudes. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 52 (3):878-882.score: 30.0
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  46. Giorgio Israel (2013). The Expulsion of Jewish Professors From University Science Departments During Fascism. Telos 2013 (164):97-115.score: 30.0
    ExcerptSeveral studies have examined the racial policies promoted by the Nazi regime from theoretical and sociological perspectives. Theoretical studies have focused their attention on the contribution that scientific disciplines (anthropology, biology, eugenics, and demography) gave to the institution of Nazi racial policies. Sociological studies have focused on the role that the German scientific community had in enforcing such policies, as well as on the consequences these policies had for the scientific community. For instance, they have considered the effect that the (...)
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  47. W. Israel (1970). Differential Forms in General Relativity. Dublin,Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies.score: 30.0
     
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  48. M. Israel (2013). Rolling Back the Bureaucracies of Ethics Review. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):525-526.score: 30.0
    Dyck and Allen's criticisms of current systems of governance are well founded, at least in some jurisdictions. Their desire to halt the expansion and intensification of research ethics governance is to be applauded. However, their listed categories of research to be exempted from mandatory review may not create a better system.
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  49. Joachim Israel (2002). Remarks on Marxism and the Philosophy of Langauge. In G. N. Kitching & Nigel Pleasants (eds.), Marx and Wittgenstein: Knowledge, Morality and Politics. Routledge. 35--213.score: 30.0
  50. David Israel (1989). Review: William J. Rapaport, Logical Foundations for Belief Representation. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (2):617-618.score: 30.0
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