Search results for 'J. A. Zimmerman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. K. V. Smith, J. Witt, J. Klaassen, C. Zimmerman & A. -L. Cheng (2012). High-Fidelity Simulation and Legal/Ethical Concepts: A Transformational Learning Experience. Nursing Ethics 19 (3):390-398.score: 1350.0
    Students in an undergraduate legal and ethical issues course continually told the authors that they did not have time to study for the course because they were busy studying for their clinical courses. Faculty became concerned that students were failing to realize the value of legal and ethical concepts as applicable to clinical practice. This led the authors to implement a transformational learning experience in which students applied legal and ethical course content in a high-fidelity human simulation (HFHS) scenario. A (...)
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  2. H. J. Grosz & J. A. Zimmerman (1965). Experimental Analysis of Hysterical Blindness: A Follow-Up Report and New Experimental Data. Archives of General Psychiatry 13:255-60.score: 1320.0
  3. Michael J. Zimmerman (2014). Ignorance and Moral Obligation. Oup Oxford.score: 1170.0
    Michael J. Zimmerman explores whether and how our ignorance about ourselves and our circumstances affects what our moral obligations and moral rights are. He rejects objective and subjective views of the nature of moral obligation, and presents a new case for a 'prospective' view.
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  4. Michael E. Zimmerman (1985). The Critique of Natural Rights and the Search for a Non-Anthropocentric Basis for Moral Behavior. Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (1):43-53.score: 900.0
    MacIntyre, Clark, and Heidegger would all agree that the current problem with moral theory is its lack of a satisfactory conception of human telos. This lack leads us to resort to such fictions as rights, interests, and utility, which are “disguises for the will to power.” Ibid., p. 240. These thinkers would also agree that modern nation-states are cut off from the roots of the Western tradition. Modern political economy, with “its individualism, its acquisitiveness and its elevation of the values (...)
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  5. William K. Michener, Thomas J. Baerwald, Penelope Firth, Margaret A. Palmer, James L. Rosenberger, Elizabeth A. Sandlin & Herman Zimmerman (2001). Defining and Unraveling Biocomplexity. BioScience 51 (12):1018.score: 870.0
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  6. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Moral Luck: A Partial Map. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):585-608.score: 810.0
  7. Michael J. Zimmerman (2002). Controlling Ignorance: A Bitter Truth. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):483–490.score: 810.0
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  8. Michael J. Zimmerman (2013). The Immorality of Punishment: A Reply to Levy. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-10.score: 810.0
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  9. Michael J. Zimmerman (1997). A Plea for Accuses. American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (2):229 - 243.score: 810.0
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  10. Michael J. Zimmerman (1993). A Plea for Ambivalence. Metaphilosophy 24 (4):382-389.score: 810.0
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  11. M. C., Oscar Broneer, Corinth X., F. Zimmerman, Hans Licht, J. H. Freese, Alfred Gercke, Eduard Norden, E. Pernice, A. Rumpf, K. Regling & V. Ehrenberg (1932). Corinth X: The OdeumFestschrift zu Franz Polands funfundsiebzigstem GeburtstagSexual Life in Ancient GreeceEinleitung in der AltertumswissenschaftEinleitung in der Altertumswissenschaft Vol. II, Part 1: Griechisches und romisches PrivatlebenEinleitung in der Altertumswissenschaft Vol. II, Part 3: Griechische und romische KunstEinleitung in der Altertumswissenschaft Vol. II, Part 2. MunzkundeEinleitung in der Altertumswissenschaft Vol. III, Part 3: Der griechische und der hellenistische Staat. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 52:311.score: 810.0
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  12. H. G. Baker, Jean Langenheim, Bryon Blair, Katharina Lettau, R. F. Daubenmire, A. A. Lindsey, G. R. de Foliart, O. L. Loucks, F. C. Evans, F. E. Smith, G. E. Gilbert, F. Stearns, W. Hilsenhoff, M. W. Weller, R. Horrall, J. H. Zimmerman, S. C. Kendeigh & L. C. Bliss (1967). Phenology Program of the IBP. BioScience 17 (10):712-714.score: 810.0
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  13. Stephen R. Carpenter, E. Virginia Armbrust, Peter W. Arzberger, F. Stuart Chapin, James J. Elser, Edward J. Hackett, Anthony R. Ives, Peter M. Kareiva, Mathew A. Leibold, Per Lundberg, Marc Mangel, Nirav Merchant, William W. Murdoch, Margaret A. Palmer, Debra P. C. Peters, Steward T. A. Pickett, Kathleen K. Smith, Diana H. Wall & Ann S. Zimmerman (2009). Accelerate Synthesis in Ecology and Environmental Sciences. BioScience 59 (8):699-701.score: 810.0
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  14. Peder Anker, Per Ariansen, Alfred J. Ayer, Murray Bookchin, Baird Callicott, John Clark, Bill Devall, Fons Elders, Paul Feyerabend, Warwick Fox, William C. French, Harold Glasser, Ramachandra Guha, Patsy Hallen, Stephan Harding, Andrew Mclaughlin, Ivar Mysterud, Arne Naess, Bryan Norton, Val Plumwood, Peter Reed, Kirkpatrick Sale, Ariel Salleh, Karen Warren, Richard A. Watson, Jon Wetlesen & Michael E. Zimmerman (1999). Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 810.0
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  15. Ronald H. Nowaczyk, John J. Shaughnessy & Joel Zimmerman (1974). Proactive Interference in Short-Term Retention and the Measurement of Degree of Learning: A New Technique. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (1):45.score: 810.0
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  16. Benton J. Underwood, Paul K. Broder & Joel Zimmerman (1973). Retention of Verbal Discrimination Lists as a Function of Number of Prior Lists, Word Frequency, and Type of List. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):101.score: 810.0
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  17. Benton J. Underwood & Joel Zimmerman (1973). Serial Retention as a Function of Hierarchical Structure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (2):236.score: 810.0
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  18. Barry J. Zimmerman (1984). Contextual and Psychometric Descriptions of Intelligence: A Fundamental Conflict. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):303.score: 810.0
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  19. Michael J. Zimmerman (2008). Living with Uncertainty: The Moral Significance of Ignorance. Cambridge University Press.score: 720.0
    Every choice we make is set against a background of massive ignorance about our past, our future, our circumstances, and ourselves. Philosophers are divided on the moral significance of such ignorance. Some say that it has a direct impact on how we ought to behave - the question of what our moral obligations are; others deny this, claiming that it only affects how we ought to be judged in light of the behaviour in which we choose to engage - the (...)
     
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  20. Michael J. Zimmerman (2011). The Immorality of Punishment. Broadview Press.score: 720.0
    It is hard to imagine a state functioning at all, let alone well, without having recourse to punishing those who break its laws. In The Immorality of Punishment, Michael Zimmerman argues not merely that our current practice of punishment is deplorable but that legal punishment itself is wrong, no matter its form. This astounding thesis is defended firstly by a sustained and compelling attack on the alternatives. Punishment is not justified by its role as a deterrent, because qua deterrent, (...)
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  21. Michael J. Zimmerman, Intrinsic Vs. Extrinsic Value. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 450.0
    Intrinsic value has traditionally been thought to lie at the heart of ethics. Philosophers use a number of terms to refer to such value. The intrinsic value of something is said to be the value that that thing has “in itself,” or “for its own sake,” or “as such,” or “in its own right.” Extrinsic value is value that is not intrinsic.
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  22. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Is Moral Obligation Objective or Subjective? Utilitas 18 (4):329-361.score: 450.0
    Many philosophers hold that whether an act is overall morally obligatory is an ‘objective’ matter, many that it is a ‘subjective’ matter, and some that it is both. The idea that it is or can be both may seem to promise a helpful answer to the question ‘What ought I to do when I do not know what I ought to do?’ In this article, three broad views are distinguished regarding what it is that obligation essentially concerns: the maximization of (...)
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  23. Michael J. Zimmerman (1996). The Concept of Moral Obligation. Cambridge University Press.score: 450.0
    The principal aim of this book is to develop and defend an analysis of the concept of moral obligation. The analysis is neutral regarding competing substantive theories of obligation, whether consequentialist or deontological in character. What it seeks to do is generate new solutions to a range of philosophical problems concerning obligation and its application. Amongst these problems are deontic paradoxes, the supersession of obligation, conditional obligation, prima facie obligation, actualism and possibilism, dilemmas, supererogation, and cooperation. By virtue of its (...)
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  24. Michael J. Zimmerman (2010). Responsibility, Reaction, and Value. Journal of Ethics 14 (2):103-115.score: 450.0
    Many writers accept the following thesis about responsibility: (R) For one to be responsible for something is for one to be such that it is fitting that one be the object of some reactive attitude with respect to that thing. This thesis bears a striking resemblance to a thesis about value that is also accepted by many writers: (V) For something to be good (or neutral, or bad) is for it to be such that it is fitting that it be (...)
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  25. Michael J. Zimmerman (2009). Understanding What's Good for Us. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):429 - 439.score: 450.0
    The ancient question of what a good life consists in is currently the focus of intense debate. There are two aspects to this debate: the first concerns how the concept of a good life is to be understood; the second concerns what kinds of life fall within the extension of this concept. In this paper, I will attend only to the first, conceptual aspect and not to the second, substantive aspect. More precisely, I will address the preliminary, underlying question of (...)
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  26. Michael J. Zimmerman (2007). The Good and the Right. Utilitas 19 (3):326-353.score: 450.0
    T. M. Scanlon has revived a venerable tradition according to which something's being good consists in its being such that there is a reason to respond positively towards it. He has presented novel arguments for this thesis. In this article, I first develop some refinements of the thesis with a view to focusing on intrinsic value in particular, then discuss the relation between the thesis and consequentialism, then critically examine Scanlon's arguments for the thesis, and finally turn to the question (...)
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  27. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). On the Fulfillment of Moral Obligation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):577-597.score: 450.0
    This paper considers three general views about the nature of moral obligation and three particular answers (with which these views are typically associated) concerning the following question: if on Monday you lend me a book that I promise to return to you by Friday, what precisely is my obligation to you and what constitutes its fulfillment? The example is borrowed from W.D. Ross, who in The Right and the Good proposed what he called the Objective View of obligation, from (...)
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  28. Michael J. Zimmerman (1987). Luck and Moral Responsibility. Ethics 97 (2):374-386.score: 450.0
    The following argument is addressed: (1) a person is morally responsible for an event's occurring only if that event's occurring was not a matter of luck; (2) no event is such that its occurring is not a matter of luck; therefore, (3) no event is such that someone is morally responsible for its occurring. Two notions of control are distinguished: restricted and complete. (2) is shown false on the first interpretation, (1) on the second. The discussion involves a distinction between (...)
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  29. M. J. Zimmerman (2011). Partiality and Intrinsic Value. Mind 120 (478):447-483.score: 450.0
    The fitting-attitudes analysis of value, which states that something's being good consists in its being the fitting object of some pro-attitude, has recently been the focus of intense debate. Many objections have been levelled against this analysis. One objection to it concerns the ‘challenge from partiality’, according to which it can be fitting to display partiality toward objects of equal value. Several responses to the challenge have been proposed. This paper criticizes these and other responses and then offers a response (...)
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  30. Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). Virtual Intrinsic Value and the Principle of Organic Unities. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):653-666.score: 450.0
    This paper argues that Moore's principle of organic unities is false. Advocates of the principle have failed to take note of the distinction between actual intrinsic value and virtual intrinsic value. Purported cases of organic unities, where the actual intrinsic value of a part of a whole is allegedly defeated by the actual intrinsic value of the whole itself, are more plausibly seen as cases where the part in question has no actual intrinsic value but instead a plurality of merely (...)
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  31. Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) (2005). Recent Work on Intrinsic Value. Springer.score: 450.0
    Recent Work on Intrinsic Value brings together for the first time many of the most important and influential writings on the topic of intrinsic value to have appeared in the last half-century. During this period, inquiry into the nature of intrinsic value has intensified to such an extent that at the moment it is one of the hottest topics in the field of theoretical ethics. The contributions to this volume have been selected in such a way that all of the (...)
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  32. Michael J. Zimmerman (1995). Prima Facie Obligation and Doing the Best One Can. Philosophical Studies 78 (2):87 - 123.score: 450.0
    Analyses are given of the concepts of absolute and prima facie obligation. The former is a maximizing analysis: roughly, one ought absolutely to perform those actions which are performed in the best worlds accessible to one. The latter analysis is roughly this: one ought prima facie to perform those actions which are such that those accessible worlds in which they are performed are better than the closest accessible worlds in which they are not performed. Accounts of conditional obligation, both absolute (...)
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  33. M. J. Zimmerman (2006). Risk, Rights, and Restitution. Philosophical Studies 128 (2):285 - 311.score: 450.0
    In “Imposing Risks,” Judith Thomson gives a case in which, by turning on her stove, she accidentally causes her neighbor’s death. She claims that both the following are true: (1) she ought not to have caused her neighbor’s death; (2) it was permissible for her to turn her stove on. In this paper it is argued that it cannot be that both (1) and (2) are true, that (2) is true, and that therefore (1) is false. How this is so (...)
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  34. Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2005). Self-Verification and the Content of Thought. Synthese 149 (1):59 - 75.score: 450.0
    Descartes famously argued, on purely conceptual grounds, that even an extremely powerful being could not trick him into mistakenly judging that he was thinking. Of course, it is not necessarily true that Descartes is thinking. Still, Descartes claimed, it is necessarily true that if a person judges that she is thinking, that person is thinking. Following Tyler Burge (1988) we call such judgments ‘self-verifying.’ More exactly, a judgment j performed by a subject S at a time t is selfverifying if (...)
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  35. Michael E. Zimmerman (1988). Quantum Theory, Intrinsic Value, and Panentheism. Environmental Ethics 10 (1):3-30.score: 450.0
    J. Baird Callicott seeks to resolve the problem of the intrinsic value of nature by utilizing a nondualistic paradigm derived from quantum theory. His approach is twofold. According to his less radical approach, quantum theory shows that properties once considered to be “primary” and “objective” are in fact the products of interactions between observer and observed. Values are also the products of such interactions. According to his more radical approach, quantum theory’s doctrine of internal relations is the model for the (...)
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  36. Michael J. Zimmerman (2001). The Nature of Intrinsic Value. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 450.0
    At the heart of ethics reside the concepts of good and bad; they are at work when we assess whether a person is virtuous or vicious, an act right or wrong, a decision defensible or indefensible, a goal desirable or undesirable. But there are many varieties of goodness and badness. At their core lie intrinsic goodness and badness, the sort of value that something has for its own sake. It is in virtue of intrinsic value that other types of value (...)
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  37. Michael J. Zimmerman (1992). Cooperation and Doing the Best One Can. Philosophical Studies 65 (3):283 - 304.score: 450.0
    The view that what one ought, or is obligated, to do is the best that one can do faces a problem even from the perspective of someone sympathetic with the view: there are cases of group action where, through lack of cooperation, the best that can be done is not done and yet where, it seems, each individual does the best that he or she can do. In this paper, various attempts to deal with this problem are criticized and then (...)
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  38. Michael J. Zimmerman (1983). Evaluatively Incomplete States of Affairs. Philosophical Studies 43 (2):211 - 224.score: 450.0
    The main point of this paper has been to show that the concept of evaluative incompleteness deserves consideration. In addition, I have suggested that it is plausible to accept that certain states of affairs in fact are evaluatively incomplete. But I have not sought to prove that this is so; indeed, I do not know how such proof might be given. Just which states of affairs, if any, are evaluatively incomplete is an extremely vexed question, and it is not one (...)
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  39. Michael J. Zimmerman (1982). Moral Responsibility, Freedom and Alternate Possibilities. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 63.score: 450.0
    Frankfurt has attacked the principle that a person is morally responsible for what he has done only if he could have done otherwise, And he has thereby sought to undermine the traditional debate between compatibilists and incompatibilists. The role that the principle plays in this debate is clarified. Frankfurt's type of argument is then assessed for its implications concerning both the principle and the debate. It is argued that the debate, Even if not the principle, May well emerge intact.
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  40. Ryan Wasserman (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Problem of Change. Philosophy Compass 5 (3):283-286.score: 81.0
    Our world is a world of change. Children are born and grow into adults. Material possessions rust and decay with age and ultimately perish. Yet scepticism about change is as old as philosophy itself. Heraclitus, for example, argued that nothing could survive the replacement of parts, so that it is impossible to step into the same river twice. Zeno argued that motion is paradoxical, so that nothing can alter its location. Parmenides and his followers went even further, arguing that the (...)
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  41. Geoffrey Scarre & Robin Coningham (eds.) (2012). Appropriating the Past: Philosophical Perspectives on the Practice of Archaeology. Cambridge University Press.score: 81.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction Geoffrey Scarre and Robin Coningham; Part I. Claiming the Past: 2. The values of the past James O. Young; 3. Whose past? archaeological knowledge, community knowledge, and the embracing of conflict Piotr Bienkowski; 4. The past people want: heritage for the majority? Cornelius Holtorf; 5. The ethics of repatriation: rights of possession and duties of respect Janna Thompson; 6. On archaeological ethics and letting go Larry J. Zimmerman; 7. Hintang and the dilemma of (...)
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  42. Connie Romig Bradley J. Morris, Steve Croker, Corinne Zimmerman, Devin Gill (2013). Gaming Science: The “Gamification” of Scientific Thinking. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 45.0
    Science is critically important for advancing economics, health, and social well being in the 21st century. A scientifically literate workforce is one that is well suited to meet the challenges of an information economy. However, scientific thinking skills do not routinely develop and must be scaffolded via educational and cultural tools. In this paper we outline a rationale for why we believe that video games have the potential to be exploited for gain in science education. The premise we entertain is (...)
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  43. J. Fernandez, Privileged Access Revisited.score: 45.0
    Aaron Zimmerman has recently raised an interesting objection to an account of self-knowledge I have offered. The objection has the form of a dilemma: either it is possible for us to be entitled to beliefs which we do not form, or it is not. If it is, the conditions for introspective justification within the model I advocate are insufficient. If not, they are otiose. I challenge Zimmerman's defence of the first horn of the dilemma.
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