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Jeffrey C. Alexander [32]J. McKenzie Alexander [27]Joshua Alexander [15]John K. Alexander [7]
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Profile: Joshua Alexander (Siena College)
Profile: Jeffrey Hugh Alexander (Des Moines Area Community College)
Profile: John Alexander (Grand Valley State University)
Profile: John Alexander (Phoenix College, South Mountain Community College)
Profile: James Alexander (Kentucky Wesleyan college)
  1. J. McKenzie Alexander (forthcoming). Learning to Signal in a Dynamic World. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axt044.
    Sender–receiver games, first introduced by David Lewis ([1969]), have received increased attention in recent years as a formal model for the emergence of communication. Skyrms ([2010]) showed that simple models of reinforcement learning often succeed in forming efficient, albeit not necessarily minimal, signalling systems for a large family of games. Later, Alexander et al. ([2012]) showed that reinforcement learning, combined with forgetting, frequently produced both efficient and minimal signalling systems. In this article, I define a ‘dynamic’ sender–receiver game in which (...)
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  2. James Alexander (forthcoming). Notes Towards A Definition of Politics. Philosophy:1-28.
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  3. Joshua Alexander, Chad Gonnerman & John Waterman (forthcoming). Salience and Epistemic Egocentrism: An Empirical Study. In James Beebe (ed.), Advances in Experimental Epistemology. Continuum.
    Jennifer Nagel (2010) has recently proposed a fascinating account of the decreased tendency to attribute knowledge in conversational contexts in which unrealized possibilities of error have been mentioned. Her account appeals to epistemic egocentrism, or what is sometimes called the curse of knowledge, an egocentric bias to attribute our own mental states to other people (and sometimes our own future and past selves). Our aim in this paper is to investigate the empirical merits of Nagel’s hypothesis about the psychology involved (...)
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  4. José Edgar Carmona Franco, Amaya Díaz, José Alexander & Karen Lizeth Salcedo Rodríguez (forthcoming). Principio de la conservación de la energía mecánica en caída libre. Scientia.
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  5. J. C. Alexander (2014). The Fate of the Dramatic in Modern Society: Social Theory and the Theatrical Avant-Garde. Theory, Culture and Society 31 (1):3-24.
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  6. J. C. Alexander (2013). The Arc of Civil Liberation Obama–Tahrir–Occupy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (4-5):341-347.
    Despite anxieties about the growing power of neo-liberalism, the crisis of the EU and the upsurge of right-wing political movements, it is important to recognize that utopian movements on the left have also in recent years been symbolically revitalized and organizationally sustained. This article analyses three recent social upheavals as utopian civil society movements, placing the 2008 US presidential campaign of Barack Obama, the Egyptian uprising in Tahrir Square and the Occupy Movement in the USA inside the narrative arc that (...)
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  7. J. M. Alexander (2013). On the Redress of Grievances. Analysis 73 (2):228-230.
    Consider the problem of allocating a scarce resource to people. A fair decision procedure is one where each person has an equal chance of receiving the resource. An unfair decision procedure is one where the chances are not equal. Normally we think that, in an unfair decision procedure, that the correct way to redress the injustice is by rerunning the allocation using a fair decision procedure. In this paper, I show that this actually creates an overall bias favouring one person, (...)
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  8. J. McKenzie Alexander, Preferential Attachment and the Search for Successful Theories.
    Multiarm bandit problems have been used to model the selection of competing scientific theories by boundedly rational agents. In this paper, I define a variable-arm bandit problem, which allows the set of scientific theories to vary over time. I show that Roth-Erev reinforcement learning, which solves multiarm bandit problems in the limit, cannot solve this problem in a reasonable time. However, social learning via preferential attachment combined with individual reinforcement learning which discounts the past, does.
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  9. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2013). The Dark Side of Modernity. Polity Press.
    Social theory between progress and apocalypse -- Autonomy and domination: Weber's cage -- Barbarism and modernity: Eisenstadt's regret -- Integration and justice: Parsons' utopia -- Despising others: Simmel's stranger -- Meaning evil -- De-civilizing the civil sphere -- Psychotherapy as central institution -- The frictions of modernity and their possible repair.
     
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  10. Danielsen Anne, Haugen Mari & Jensenius Alexander (2013). Moving to the Beat. Analysing Motion Responses to Different Pulse Shapes. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  11. Jonathan M. Weinberg, Joshua Alexander, Chad Gonnerman & Shane Reuter (2013). Restrictionism and Reflection: Challenge Deflected, or Simply Redirected? The Monist 95 (2):200-222.
    It has become increasingly popular to respond to experimental philosophy by suggesting that experimental philosophers haven’t been studying the right kind of thing. One version of this kind of response, which we call the reflection defense, involves suggesting both that philosophers are interested only in intuitions that are the product of careful reflection on the details of hypothetical cases and the key concepts involved in those cases, and that these kinds of philosophical intuitions haven’t yet been (and possibly cannot be) (...)
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  12. J. McKenzie Alexander (2012). Decision Theory Meets the Witch of Agnesi. Journal of Philosophy 109 (12):712-727.
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  13. J. McKenzie Alexander (2012). Why the Angels Cannot Choose. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):619 - 640.
    Decision theory faces a number of problematic gambles which challenge it to say what value an ideal rational agent should assign to the gamble, and why. Yet little attention has been devoted to the question of what an ideal rational agent is, and in what sense decision theory may be said to apply to one. I show that, given one arguably natural set of constraints on the preferences of an idealized rational agent, such an agent is forced to be indifferent (...)
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  14. James Alexander (2012). The Four Points of the Compass. Philosophy 87 (01):79-107.
    Philosophy has four forms: wonder, faith, doubt and scepticism. These are not separate categories, but separate ideal possibilities. Modern academic philosophy has fallen, for several centuries, into an error: which is the error of supposing that philosophy is only what I call doubt. Philosophy may be doubt: indeed, it is part of my argument that this is undeniably one element of, or one possibility in, philosophy; but doubt is only one of four points of the compass. In this essay I (...)
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  15. James Alexander (2012). Three Rival Views of Tradition (Arendt, Oakeshott and MacIntyre). Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):20-43.
  16. James Alexander (2012). What Are Universities For? By Stefan Collini: Pp 216+ Viii. London: Penguin. 2012.£ 9.99 (Pbk). ISBN 978-1-846-14482-0. British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (4):450-451.
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  17. Joshua Alexander (2012). Author Q & A. The Philosophers' Magazine 58:125-126.
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  18. Joshua Alexander (2012). Experimental Philosophy: An Introduction. Polity Press.
  19. Joshua Alexander, Mark Alicke, Holly Andersen, Michael Anderson, Kristin Andrews, István Aranyosi, Adam Arico, Nomy Arpaly, Robert Audi & Andrew Bailey (2012). Philosophical Psychology Would Like to Thank the Following for Contributing to the Journal as Reviewers This Past Year: Fred Adams Kenneth Aizawa. Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):161-163.
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  20. S. Matthew Liao, Alex Wiegmann, Joshua Alexander & Gerard Vong (2012). Putting the Trolley in Order: Experimental Philosophy and the Loop Case. Philosophical Psychology 25 (5):661-671.
    In recent years, a number of philosophers have conducted empirical studies that survey people's intuitions about various subject matters in philosophy. Some have found that intuitions vary accordingly to seemingly irrelevant facts: facts about who is considering the hypothetical case, the presence or absence of certain kinds of content, or the context in which the hypothetical case is being considered. Our research applies this experimental philosophical methodology to Judith Jarvis Thomson's famous Loop Case, which she used to call into question (...)
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  21. J. McKenzie Alexander (2011). Expectations and Choiceworthiness. Mind 120 (479):803-817.
    The Pasadena game is an example of a decision problem which lacks an expected value, as traditionally conceived. Easwaran (2008) has shown that, if we distinguish between two different kinds of expectations, which he calls ‘strong’ and ‘weak’, the Pasadena game lacks a strong expectation but has a weak expectation. Furthermore, he argues that we should use the weak expectation as providing a measure of the value of an individual play of the Pasadena game. By considering a modified version of (...)
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  22. James Alexander (2011). Oakeshott on Hegel's 'Injudicious' Use of the Word 'State'. History of Political Thought 32 (1):147-176.
    This article attempts to make sense of Oakeshott's enigmatic comment in 'On Human Conduct' that it was perhaps injudicious of Hegel to use the word state in the Philosophy of Right for his conception of a bounded association. But the article does not confine itself to making sense of Oakeshott's meaning: it compares Oakeshott's conception of societas to Hegel's conception of der Staat, Oakeshott's conception of philosophy as an unconditional consideration of conditional objects with Hegel's conception of philosophy as a (...)
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  23. James Alexander (2011). On What Matters. Philosophy Now 87:42-43.
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  24. James C. Alexander (2011). Blending in Mathematics. Semiotica 2011 (187):1-48.
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  25. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2011). Fact-Signs and Cultural Sociology: How Meaning-Making Liberates the Social Imagination. Thesis Eleven 104 (1):87-93.
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  26. John Alexander (2011). Sweatshops, Context Differentiation, and the Rational Person Standard. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 18 (1):68-74.
    In making decisions regardmg what to do, people should employ plausible moral standards to defend what they think is morally permissible. One plausible moral standard that is often used is what I refer to as the Rational Person Standard: we, as rational agents, ought to choose the option that has the greatest benefit for us, under the constraint that what we choose does not unfairly limit other people from choosing what they think is best for them. Another way to phrase (...)
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  27. John K. Alexander (2011). An Outline of a Pragmatic Method for Deciding What To Do. Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association (American Philosophical Practitioners Association) 6 (2).
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  28. John M. Alexander & Jane Buckingham (2011). Common Good Leadership in Business Management: An Ethical Model From the Indian Tradition. Business Ethics 20 (4):317-327.
    While dominant management thinking is steered by profit maximisation, this paper proposes that sustained organisational growth can best be stimulated by attention to the common good and the capacity of corporate leaders to create commitment to the common good. The leadership thinking of Kautilya and Ashoka embodies this principle. Both offer a common good approach, emphasising the leader's moral and legal responsibility for people's welfare, the robust interaction between the business community and the state, and the importance of moral training (...)
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  29. Kathleen Akins, Pignocchi Alessandro, Joshua Alexander, Anna Alexandrova, Keith Allen, Sophie Allen, Colin Allen, Maria Alvarez, Santiago Amaya & Ben Ambridge (2010). Philosophical Psychology Would Like to Thank Our Reviewers for Their Generous Contributions to the Journal in 2010. Jonathan Adler Kenneth Aizawa. Philosophical Psychology 23 (6):845-848.
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  30. J. McKenzie Alexander (2010). Local Interactions and the Dynamics of Rational Deliberation. Philosophical Studies 147 (1):103 - 121.
    Whereas The Stag Hunt and the Evolution of Social Structure supplements Evolution of the Social Contract by examining some of the earlier work’s strategic problems in a local interaction setting, no equivalent supplement exists for The Dynamics of Rational Deliberation . In this article, I develop a general framework for modeling the dynamics of rational deliberation in a local interaction setting. In doing so, I show that when local interactions are permitted, three interesting phenomena occur: (a) the attracting deliberative equilibria (...)
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  31. J. McKenzie Alexander, Reconciling Morality with the Theory of Rational Choice Via Evolution.
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  32. J. McKenzie Alexander (2010). Robustness, Optimality, and the Handicap Principle. Biology and Philosophy 25 (5).
  33. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2010). Iconic Consciousness: The Material Feeling of Meaning. Thesis Eleven 103 (1):10-25.
    This article suggests an iconic turn in cultural sociology. Icons can be seen, it is argued, as symbolic condensations that root social meanings in material form, allowing the abstractions of cognition and morality to be subsumed, to be made invisible, by aesthetic shape. Meaning is made iconically visible, in other words, by the beautiful, sublime, ugly, or simply by the mundane materiality of everyday life. But it is via the senses that iconic power is made. This new approach to meaning (...)
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  34. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2010). Marxism and the Spirit of Socialism: Cultural Origins of Anti-Capitalism (1982). Thesis Eleven 100 (1):84-105.
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  35. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2010). The 'Marxism Project' in The History of Its Times. Thesis Eleven 100 (1):81-83.
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  36. John M. Alexander (2010). Ending the Liberal Hegemony: Republican Freedom and Amartya Sen's Theory of Capabilities. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (1):5.
  37. Joshua Alexander (2010). Is Experimental Philosophy Philosophically Significant? Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):377-389.
    Experimental philosophy has emerged as a very specific kind of response to an equally specific way of thinking about philosophy, one typically associated with philosophical analysis and according to which philosophical claims are measured, at least in part, by our intuitions. Since experimental philosophy has emerged as a response to this way of thinking about philosophy, its philosophical significance depends, in no small part, on how significant the practice of appealing to intuitions is to philosophy. In this paper, I defend (...)
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  38. Joshua Alexander, Ronald Mallon & Jonathan Weinberg (2010). Competence: What's In? What's Out? Who Knows? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):329-330.
    Knobe's argument rests on a way of distinguishing performance errors from the competencies that delimit our cognitive architecture. We argue that other sorts of evidence than those that he appeals to are needed to illuminate the boundaries of our folk capacities in ways that would support his conclusions.
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  39. Joshua Alexander, Ronald Mallon & Jonathan M. Weinberg (2010). Accentuate the Negative. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):297-314.
    Our interest in this paper is to drive a wedge of contention between two different programs that fall under the umbrella of “experimental philosophy”. In particular, we argue that experimental philosophy’s “negative program” presents almost as significant a challenge to its “positive program” as it does to more traditional analytic philosophy.
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  40. Jean-Louis Dessalles, Edouard Machery, Fiona Cowie & Jason Mckenzie Alexander (2010). Symposium on J.-L. Dessalles's Why We Talk. Biology and Philosophy 25 (5).
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  41. Edouard Machery, Jean-Louis Dessalles, Fiona Cowie & Jason Alexander (2010). Symposium on J.-L. Dessalles's Why We Talk (OUP, 2007): Precis by J.-L. Dessalles, Commentaries by E. Machery, F. Cowie, and J. Alexander, Replies by J.-L. Dessalles. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):851-901.
    This symposium discusses J.-L. Dessalles's account of the evolution of language, which was presented in Why we Talk (OUP 2007).
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  42. Jonathan M. Weinberg, Chad Gonnerman, Cameron Buckner & Joshua Alexander (2010). Are Philosophers Expert Intuiters? Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):331-355.
    Recent experimental philosophy arguments have raised trouble for philosophers' reliance on armchair intuitions. One popular line of response has been the expertise defense: philosophers are highly-trained experts, whereas the subjects in the experimental philosophy studies have generally been ordinary undergraduates, and so there's no reason to think philosophers will make the same mistakes. But this deploys a substantive empirical claim, that philosophers' training indeed inculcates sufficient protection from such mistakes. We canvass the psychological literature on expertise, which indicates that people (...)
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  43. J. McKenzie Alexander (2009). Social Deliberation: Nash, Bayes, and the Partial Vindication of Gabriele Tarde. Episteme 6 (2):164-184.
    At the very end of the 19th century, Gabriele Tarde wrote that all society was a product of imitation and innovation. This view regarding the development of society has, to a large extent, fallen out of favour, and especially so in those areas where the rational actor model looms large. I argue that this is unfortunate, as models of imitative learning, in some cases, agree better with what people actually do than more sophisticated models of learning. In this paper, I (...)
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  44. Jeffrey A. Alexander, Gary J. Young, Bryan J. Weiner & Larry R. Hearld (2009). How Do System-Affiliated Hospitals Fare in Providing Community Benefit? Inquiry 46 (1):72-91.
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  45. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2009). Social Subjectivity: Psychotherapy as Central Institution. Thesis Eleven 96 (1):128-134.
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  46. John Alexander (2009). 11 Ottoman Frontier Policies in North-East Africa, 1517-1914. Proceedings of the British Academy 156:225.
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  47. Jonathan Alexander & Karen Yescavage (2009). The Scholars Formerly Known As…': Bisexuality, Queerness and Identity Politics. In Noreen Giffney & Michael O'Rourke (eds.), The Ashgate Research Companion to Queer Theory. Ashgate.
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  48. J. C. Alexander (2008). Iconic Experience in Art and Life: Surface/Depth Beginning with Giacometti's Standing Woman. Theory, Culture and Society 25 (5):1-19.
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  49. J. McKenzie Alexander, Co-Operation.
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  50. John K. Alexander (2008). Eliminating the Harm We Cause. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (1):11-21.
    Peter Singer places a stringent requirement on us to come to the aid of those who are suffering, as long as we do not have to give up something of comparable worth. I consider some criticisms of this view here, while arguing in defense of Singer’s conclusion. I presume here that it is morally impermissible to create unnecessary and avoidable harm to innocent people. I argue that if we have an adequate understanding of agent causation and moral responsibility then we (...)
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