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  1. J. Baird Callicott (forthcoming). African Biocomnuinitarianism and Australian Dreamtime. Environmental Ethics: Divergence and Convergence.
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  2. J. Baird Callicott (forthcoming). A Critique of and an Alternative to the Wilderness Idea. Environmental Ethics, A. Light and H. Rolston (Eds), Blackwell Publishing, Oxford.
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  3. J. Baird Callicott (forthcoming). Environmental Ethics: An Overview. Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
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  4. J. Baird Callicott (2014). Thinking Like a Planet: The Land Ethic and the Earth Ethic. Oup Usa.
    Bringing together ecology, evolutionary moral psychology, and environmental ethics, J. Baird Callicott counters the narrative of blame and despair that prevails in contemporary discussions of climate ethics and offers a fresh, more optimistic approach.
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  5. J. Baird Callicott (2011). Postmodern Ecological Restoration: Choosing Appropriate Temporal and Spatial Scales. In Kevin deLaplante, Bryson Brown & Kent A. Peacock (eds.), Philosophy of Ecology. North-Holland. 11--301.
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  6. J. Baird Callicott (2011). The Temporal and Spatial Scales of Global Climate Change and the Limits of Individualistic and Rationalistic Ethics. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:101-116.
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  7. J. Baird Callicott, William Grove-Fanning, Jennifer Rowland, Daniel Baskind, Robert Heath French & Kerry Walker (2011). Reply to Norton, Re: Aldo Leopold and Pragmatism. Environmental Values 20 (1):17 - 22.
    As a conservation policy advocate and practitioner, Leopold was a pragmatist (in the vernacular sense of the word). He was not, however, a member of the school of philosophy known as American Pragmatism, nor was his environmental philosophy informed by any members of that school. Leopold's environmental philosophy was radically non-anthropocentric; he was an intellectual revolutionary and aspired to transform social values and institutions.
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  8. J. Baird Callicott, Jonathan Parker, Jordan Batson, Nathan Bell, Keith Brown & Samantha Moss (2011). The Other in A Sand County Almanac. Aldo Leopold’s Animals and His Wild-Animal Ethic. Environmental Ethics 33 (2):115-146.
    Much philosophical attention has been devoted to “The Land Ethic,” especially by Anglo-American philosophers, but little has been paid to A Sand County Almanac as a whole. Read through the lens of continental philosophy, A Sand County Almanac promulgates an evolutionary-ecological world view and effects a personal self- and a species-specific Self-transformation in its audience. It’s author, Aldo Leopold, realizes these aims through descriptive reflection that has something in common with phenomenology-although Leopold was by no stretch of the imagination a (...)
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  9. J. Baird Callicott (2010). Toward an Earth Ethic. Dialogue and Universalism 20 (11-12):21-32.
    Aldo Leopold's 1949 Land Ethic is seminal in academic environmental ethics and the environmental-ethic-of-choice among professional conservationists and environmentalists. After sixty years, the sciences (evolutionary biology and ecology) that inform the land ethic have undergone much change. The land ethic can be revised to accommodate changes in its scientific foundations, but it cannot be scaled up to meet the challenge of global climate change. Fortunately, given the prominent place of Leopold in all circles environmental, he also faintly sketched an Earth (...)
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  10. J. Baird Callicott (2010). The Conceptual Foundations of the Land Ethic. In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and Values: Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  11. J. Baird Callicott (2009). The Convergence Hypothesis Falsified: Implicit Intrinsic Value, Operational Rights, and de Facto Standing in the Endangered Species Act. In Ben A. Minteer (ed.), Nature in Common?: Environmental Ethics and the Contested Foundations of Environmental Policy. Temple University Press.
  12. J. Baird Callicott & William Grove-Fanning (2009). Should Endangered Species Have Standing? Toward Legal Rights for Listed Species. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):317-352.
    The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) is America's strongest environmental law. Its citizen-suit provisionany personawards implicit intrinsic value, de facto standing, and operational legal rights (sensu Christopher D. Stone) to listed species. Accordingly, some cases had gone forward in the federal courts in the name of various listed species between 1979 (Palila v. Hawaii Dept. of Land & Natural Resources) and 2004 (Cetacean Community v. Bush), when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that animals could not sue in (...)
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  13. J. Baird Callicott, William Grove-Fanning, Jennifer Rowland, Daniel Baskind, Robert Heath French & Kerry Walker (2009). Was Aldo Leopold a Pragmatist? Rescuing Leopold From the Imagination of Bryan Norton. Environmental Values 18 (4):453 - 486.
    Aldo Leopold was a pragmatist in the vernacular sense of the word. Bryan G. Norton claims that Leopold was also heavily influenced by American Pragmatism, a formal school of philosophy. As evidence, Norton offers Leopold's misquotation of a definition of right (as truth) by political economist, A.T. Hadley, who was an admirer of the philosophy of William James. A search of Leopold's digitised literary remains reveals no other evidence that Leopold was directly influenced by any actual American Pragmatist or by (...)
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  14. J. Baird Callicott (2008). A Place in Space. Environmental Ethics 18 (3):321-326.
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  15. J. Baird Callicott (2008). ¿Cuál Wilderness en los Ecosistemas de Frontera? Environmental Ethics 30 (Supplement):17-33.
    Para los puritanos del siglo XVII, la costa este de América del Norte, las áreas silvestres o wilderness eran abominables y lacerantes. En el siglo XVIII, el predicador y teólogo puritano Jonathan Edwards inició el proceso de transformación de las áreas silvestres estadounidenses en un recurso estético y espiritual, un proceso que completó en el siglo XIX Ralph Waldo Emerson. Henry David Thoreau fue el primer estadounidense en recomendar la preservación de las áreas silvestres (wilderness) para propósitos de recreación trascendental (...)
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  16. J. Baird Callicott (2008). Valuing Wildlife. In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge. 439.
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  17. J. Baird Callicott (2008). What “Wilderness” in Frontier Ecosystems? Environmental Ethics 30 (3):235-249.
    Wilderness, for seventeenth-century Puritan colonists in America, was hideous and howling. In the eighteenth century, Puritan preacher and theologian, Jonathan Edwards, began the process of transforming the American wilderness into an aesthetic and spiritual resource, a process completed in the nineteenth century by Ralph Waldo Emerson. Henry David. Thoreau was the first American to recommend wilderness preservation for purposes of transcendental recreation (solitude, and aesthetic and spiritual experience). In the twentieth century, Theodore Roosevelt and Aldo Leopold advocated wilderness preservation for (...)
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  18. J. Baird Callicott (2007). The Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):119-120.
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  19. Robert Frodeman, Dale Jamieson, J. Baird Callicott, Stephen M. Gardiner, Lori Gruen, Irene J. Klaver, Eugene Hargrove, Ben A. Minteer, Bryan Norton, Clare Palmer, Holmes Rolston, Ricardo Rozzi, James P. Sterba, William M. Throop & Victoria Davion (2007). Commentary on the Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):117 - 150.
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  20. J. Baird Callicott, Miguel Acevedo, Pete Gunter, Paul Harcombe, Christopher Lindquist & Michael Monticino 1 (2006). Biocomplexity in the Big Thicket. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (1):21-45.
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  21. J. Baird Callicott, Miguel Acevedo, Pete Gunter, Paul Harcombe, Christopher Lindquist & Michael Monticino (2006). Biocomplexity in the Big Thicket. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (1):21 – 45.
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  22. J. Baird Callicott (2005). The Pragmatic Power and Promise of Theoretical Environmental Ethics. In Arthur W. Galston & Christiana Z. Peppard (eds.), Expanding Horizons in Bioethics. Springer. 185--208.
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  23. J. Baird Callicott & Clare Palmer (eds.) (2005). Environmental Philosophy: Critical Concepts in the Environment. Routledge.
    This collection gathers classic, influential, and important papers in environmental philosophy ranging from the late 1960s and early 1970s to the present. The volumes explore environmental ethics, epistemological, metaphysical, and comparative worldview questions raised by environmental concerns. The set also represents a genuinely global and international focus, and includes a full index and new introductions by the editors.
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  24. Elisa Aaltola, Gary Backhaus, John Murungi, Jennifer Bates, Emily Brady, Emily Brady Haapala, J. Baird Callicott & Robert L. Chapman (2003). Report on Books and Articles. Environmental Ethics 24:75-91.
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  25. Roger T. Ames, J. Baird Callicott, David L. Hall, Peter D. Hershock, Oliver Leaman, Janet McCracken, Robert A. McDermott, Eric Ormsby, Thomas W. Overholt, Graham Parkes, Roy Perrett, Stephen H. Phillips, Homayoon Sepasi-Tehrani & Jacqueline Trimier (2003). From Africa to Zen: An Invitation to World Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  26. J. Baird Callicott (2003). Wetland Gloom and Wetland Glory. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):33 – 45.
    Mountains were once no less feared and loathed than wetlands. Mountains, however, were aesthetically rehabilitated (in part by modern landscape painting), but wetlands remain aesthetically reviled. The three giants of American environmental philosophy--Thoreau, Muir, and Leopold--all expressed aesthetic appreciation of wetlands. For Thoreau and Muir--both of whom were a bit misanthropic and contrarian--the beauty of wetlands was largely a matter of their floral interest and wildness (freedom from human inhabitation and economic exploitation). Leopold's aesthetic appreciation of wetlands was better informed (...)
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  27. J. Baird Callicott (2002). The Pragmatic Power and Promise of Theoretical Environmental Ethics: Forging a New Discourse. Environmental Values 11 (1):3 - 25.
    Pragmatist environmental philosophers have (erroneously) assumed that environmental ethics has made little impact on environmental policy because environmental ethics has been absorbed with arcane theoretical controversies, mostly centred on the question of intrinsic value in nature. Positions on this question generate the allegedly divisive categories of anthropocentrism/nonanthropocentrism, shallow/deep ecology, and individualism/holism. The locus classicus for the objectivist concept of intrinsic value is traceable to Kant, and modifications of the Kantian form of ethical theory terminate in biocentrism. A subjectivist approach to (...)
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  28. Wilson Carey McWilliams, Bob Pepperman Taylor, Bryan G. Norton, Robyn Eckersley, Joe Bowersox, J. Baird Callicott, Catriona Sandilands, John Barry, Andrew Light, Peter S. Wenz, Luis A. Vivanco, Tim Hayward, John O'Neill, Robert Paehlke, Timothy W. Luke, Robert Gottlieb & Charles T. Rubin (2002). Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  29. J. Baird Callicott (2000). The Indigenous World or Many Indigenous Worlds? Environmental Ethics 22 (3):291-310.
    Earth’s Insights is about more than indigenous North American environmental attitudes and values. The conclusions of Hester, McPherson, Booth, and Cheney about universal indigenous environmental attitudes and values, although pronounced with papal infallibility, are based on no evidence. The unstated authority of their pronouncements seems to be the indigenous identity of two of the authors. Two other self-identified indigenous authors, V. F. Cordova and Sandy Marie Anglás Grande, argue explicitly that indigenous identity is sufficient authority for declaring what pre-Columbian indigenous (...)
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  30. J. Baird Callicott & Michael P. Nelson (2000). Intrinsic Value in Nature: A Metaethical Analysis.”. Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy 3 (5).
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  31. J. Baird Callicott (1999). Beyond the Land Ethic: More Essays in Environmental Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    A leading theorist addresses a wide spectrum of topics central to the field of environmental philosophy.
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  32. J. Baird Callicott (1999). Silencing Philosophers: Minteer and the Foundations of Anti-Foundationalism. Environmental Values 8 (4):499 - 516.
    In 'No Experience Necessary: Foundationalism and the Retreat from Culture in Environmental Ethics'. Ben A. Minteer forgivably misconstrues my critique of moral pluralism. Contrary to Minteer’s representation: I do not accuse moral pluralists of ‘moral promiscuity’: nor do I posit a ‘master principle’ to govern all human action respecting the environment: and although I offer conceptual foundations for environmental ethics, I do not claim that they rest on certain, a priori, and non-empirical intuitions. Rather, the conceptual foundations I offer for (...)
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  33. J. Baird Callicott (1998). 'Back Together Again' Again. Environmental Values 7 (4):461 - 475.
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  34. J. Baird Callicott (1997). The Challenge of a World Environmental Ethic. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 18 (1):65 - 79.
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  35. J. Baird Callicott (1996). American Indian Land Ethics. Environmental Ethics 18 (4):438-438.
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  36. J. Baird Callicott (1996). A Place in Space: Ethics, Aesthetics, and Watersheds. Environmental Ethics 18 (3):321-326.
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  37. J. Baird Callicott (1996). A Place in Space. Environmental Ethics 18 (3):321-326.
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  38. J. Baird Callicott (1996). Do Deconstructive Ecology and Sociobiology Undermine Leopold's Land Ethic? Environmental Ethics 18 (4):353-372.
    Recent deconstructive developments in ecology (doubts about the existence of unified communities and ecosystems, the diversity-stability hypothesis, and a natural homeostasis or “balance of nature”; and an emphasis on “chaos,” “perturbation,” and directionless change in living nature) and the advent of sociobiology (selfish genes) may seem to undermine the scientific foundations of environmental ethics, especially the Leopold land ethic. A reassessment of the Leopold land ethic in light of these developments (and vice versa) indicates that the land ethic is still (...)
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  39. J. Baird Callicott (1996). How Environmental Ethical Theory May Be Put Into Practice. Ethics and the Environment 1 (1):3 - 14.
    Environmentalists do not appear to walk their walk as consistently as animal liberationists and anti-abortionists. Are we therefore more hypocritical? Maybe; but there's another explanation. Unlike concern for individual animals or individual fetuses, environmental concerns are holistic (systemic)—air and waterpollution, species <span class='Hi'>extinction</span>, diminished ecological health and integrity. One pro-life pregnant woman may preserve the life of one unborn baby, the one in her uterus; and one animal liberationist can save the life of one animal, the one he didn't eat. (...)
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  40. J. Baird Callicott (1996). On Norton and the Failure of Monistic Inherentism. Environmental Ethics 18 (2):219-221.
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  41. J. Baird Callicott & Fernando J. R. da Rocha (eds.) (1996). Earth Summit Ethics: Toward a Reconstructive Postmodern Philosophy of Environmental Education. State University of New York Press.
    An international group of environmental philosophers and educators propose ways universities can produce and promote ecological literacy and environmental ethics.
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  42. J. Baird Callicott (1995). The Value of Ecosystem Health. Environmental Values 4 (4):345 - 361.
    The concept of ecosystem health is problematic. Do ecosystems as such exist? Is health an objective condition of organisms or is it socially constructed? Can 'health' be unequivocally predicated of ecosystems? Is ecosystem health both objective and valuative? Are ecosystem health and biological integrity identical? How do these concepts interface with the concept of biodiversity? Ecosystems exist, although they are turning out to be nested sets of linked process-functions with temporal boundaries, not tangible superorganisms with spatial boundaries. Ecosystem health – (...)
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  43. J. Baird Callicott (1994). Moral Monism in Environmental Ethics Defended. Journal of Philosophical Research 19:51-60.
    In dealing with concern for fellow human beings, sentient animals, and the enviroment, Christopher D. Stone suggests that a single agent adopt a different ethical theory---e.g., Kant’s, Bentham’s, Leopold’s---for each domain. Ethical theories, however, and their attendant rules and principles are embedded in moral philosophies. Employing Kant’s categorical imperative in this case, Bentham’s hedonic caIculus in that, and Leopold’s land ethic in another, a single agent would therefore have either simultaneously or cyclically to endorse contradictory moral philosophies. Instead, I suggest (...)
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