Search results for 'J. Beeckmans' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. Beeckmans (2004). Chromatically Rich Phenomenal Percepts. Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):27-44.score: 240.0
    Visual percepts frequently appear chromatically rich, yet their paucity in reportable information has led to widely accepted minimalist models of vision. The discrepancy may be resolved by positing that the richness of natural scenes is reflected in phenomenal consciousness but not in detail in the phenomenal judgments upon which reports about qualia are based. Conceptual awareness (including phenomenal judgments) arises from neural mechanisms that categorize objects, and also from mechanisms that conceptually characterize textural properties of pre-categorically segmented regions in the (...)
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  2. O. Vercruysse, P. Fransen, J. Van Nuland, J. Vanneste, P. Van Doornik, J. De Fraine, J. Kerkhofs, J. Vercruysse, A. Van Kol, J. Beyer, J. Mulders, G. Bekaert, J. Allary, J. Nota, E. Huffer, C. Verhaak, P. Ploumen, L. Vander Kerken, F. Vandenbussche, A. Cauwelier, Cl Beukers, H. Hoefnagels, M. De Wachter, S. Trooster, F. Bossuyt & R. Beeckmans (2013). Boekbesprekingen. Bijdragen 23 (2):203-232.score: 240.0
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  3. Manuel Dries (ed.) (2008). Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.score: 8.0
    Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism Manuel Dries Part 1: Time, History, Method Nietzsche's Cultural Criticism and his Historical Methodology 23 Andrea Orsucci Thucydides, Nietzsche, and Williams 35 Raymond Geuss The Late Nietzsche's Fundamental Critique of Historical Scholarship 51 Thomas H. Brobjer Part II: Genealogy, Time, Becoming Nietzsche's Timely Genealogy: An Exercise in Anti-Reductionist Naturalism 63 Tinneke Beeckman From Kantian Temporality to Nietzschean Naturalism 75 R. Kevin Hill Nietzsche's Problem of the Past 87 John Richardson Towards Adualism: Becoming and Nihilism in Nietzsche's (...)
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  4. Géraldine Brunoud, Darren M. Wells, Marina Oliva, Antoine Larrieu, Vincent Mirabet, Amy H. Burrow, Tom Beeckman, Stefan Kepinski, Jan Traas & Malcolm J. Bennett (2012). A Novel Sensor to Map Auxin Response and Distribution at High Spatio-Temporal Resolution. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 103-106.score: 8.0
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  5. S. Gaukroger & J. Schuster (2002). The Hydrostatic Paradox and the Origins of Cartesian Dynamics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (3):535-572.score: 4.0
    In the early decades of the seventeenth century, various attempts were made to develop a dynamical vocabulary on the basis of work in the practical mathematical disciplines, particularly statics and hydrostatics. The paper contrasts the Mechanica and Archimedean approaches, and within the latter compares conceptions of statics and hydrostatics and their possible extensions in the work of Stevin, Beeckman and Descartes. Descartes' approach to hydrostatics, a discussion of which forms the core of the paper, is shown to be quite different (...)
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  6. J. Sutton (2001). Rene´ Descartes. In Encyclopedia of the life sciences. Macmillan. 383-386.score: 4.0
    Descartes was born in La Haye (now Descartes) in Touraine and educated at the Jesuit college of La Fleche` in Anjou. Descartes’modern reputation as a rationalistic armchair philosopher, whose mind–body dualism is the source of damaging divisions between psychology and the life sciences, is almost entirely undeserved. Some 90% of his surviving correspondence is on mathematics and scientific matters, from acoustics and hydrostatics to chemistry and the practical problems of constructing scientific instruments. Descartes was just as interested in the motions (...)
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