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J. M. Bernstein [54]Jeffrey A. Bernstein [22]J. Bernstein [12]Jeffrey Bernstein [10]
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Profile: Justin Bernstein (University of Pennsylvania)
  1. J. M. Bernstein (1991). 8 Autonomy and Solitude. In Keith Ansell-Pearson (ed.), Nietzsche and Modern German Thought. Routledge 192.
     
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  2.  97
    L. Allison, J. Annas, Robert L. Arrington, Hans-Johann Glock, J. M. Bernstein & D. Beyleveld (1992). Appearance in This List Does Not Preclude a Future Review of the Book. Where They Are Known Prices Are Either Given in $ US or in£ UK. Mind 101.
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  3. Frederick Neuhouser, Jay M. Bernstein, Michael Quante, Ludwig Siep, Terry Pinkard, Daniel Brudney, Andreas Wildt, Nancy Fraser, Axel Honneth, Emmanuel Renault, Hans-Christoph Schmidt am Busch, Jean-Philippe Deranty & Arto Laitinen (2009). The Philosophy of Recognition: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Lexington Books.
    Edited by Hans-Christoph Schmidt am Busch & Christopher Zurn. This volume collects original, cutting-edge essays on the philosophy of recognition by international scholars eminent in the field. By considering the topic of recognition as addressed by both classical and contemporary authors, the volume explores the connections between historical and contemporary recognition research and makes substantive contributions to the further development of contemporary theories of recognition.
     
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  4.  48
    J. M. Bernstein (2001). Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Theodor W. Adorno is best known for his contributions to aesthetics and social theory. Critics have always complained about the lack of a practical, political or ethical dimension to Adorno's philosophy. In this highly original contribution to the literature on Adorno, J. M. Bernstein offers the first attempt in any language to provide an account of the ethical theory latent in Adorno's writings. Bernstein relates Adorno's ethics to major trends in contemporary moral philosophy. He analyses the full range of Adorno's (...)
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  5. J. Bernstein (1996). Animal Rights V Animal Research: A Modest Proposal. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):300-303.
    The practical problem of assuaging the opponents of animal research may be solved without formally addressing (or resolving) the underlying ethical questions of the debate. Specifically, a peaceful boycott of the "fruits" of animal research may lead to a wider cessation of such research, than, say, vocal or even violent protest. To assist those who might wish to participate in such a boycott- and, moreover, to critically inform them of the implications of their actions-1 offer a modest proposal: the use (...)
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  6. J. M. Bernstein (2005). Suffering Injustice: Misrecognition as Moral Injury in Critical Theory. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (3):303 – 324.
    It is the persistence of social suffering in a world in which it could be eliminated that for Adorno is the source of the need for critical reflection, for philosophy. Philosophy continues and gains its cultural place because an as yet unbridgeable abyss separates the social potential for the relief of unnecessary human suffering and its emphatic continuance. Philosophy now is the culturally bound repository for the systematic acknowledgement and articulation of the meaning of the expanse of human suffering within (...)
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  7.  64
    J. M. Bernstein (2011). Trust: On the Real but Almost Always Unnoticed, Ever-Changing Foundation of Ethical Life. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):395-416.
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  8. Jay M. Bernstein (2003). Love and Law: Hegel's Critique of Morality. Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (2):393-431.
     
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  9.  66
    J. M. Bernstein (2010). Axel Honneth, The Pathologies of Individual Freedom: Hegel's Social Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).
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  10.  9
    J. M. Bernstein (1992). The Fate of Art: Aesthetic Alienation From Kant to Derrida and Adorno. Penn State University Press.
    Aesthetic alienation may be described as the paradoxical relationship whereby art and truth have come to be divorced from one another while nonetheless remaining entwined. J. M. Bernstein not only finds the separation of art and truth problematic, but also contends that we continue to experience art as sensuous and particular, thus complicating and challenging the cultural self-understanding of modernity. Bernstein focuses on the work of four key philosophers—Kant, Heidegger, Derrida, and Adorno—and provides powerful new interpretations of their views. Bernstein (...)
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  11.  56
    J. M. Bernstein (2011). Is Ethical Naturalism Possible? From Life to Recognition. Constellations 18 (1):8-20.
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  12.  12
    Jeffrey A. Bernstein (1996). The Relevance of Philosophy to Life. Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):167-168.
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  13.  21
    J. M. Bernstein & Monochromes Readymades (forthcoming). Subjects/Titles. Diacritics.
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  14. J. M. Bernstein (1996). Confession and Forgiveness: Hegel's Poetics of Action. In Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.), Beyond Representation: Philosophy and Poetic Imagination. Cambridge University Press 34--65.
     
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  15.  1
    Magdalena Zolkos, J. M. Bernstein, Roy Ben-Shai, Thomas Brudholm, Arne Grøn, Dennis B. Klein, Kitty J. Millet, Joseph Rosen, Philipa Rothfield, Melanie Steiner Sherwood, Wolfgang Treitler, Aleksandra Ubertowska, Michael Ure, Anna Yeatman & Markus Zisselsberger (2011). On Jean Améry: Philosophy of Catastrophe. Lexington Books.
    This volume offers the first English language collection of academic essays on the post-Holocaust thought of Jean Améry, a Jewish-Austrian-Belgian essayist, journalist and literary author. Comprehensive in scope and multi-disciplinary in orientation, contributors explore central aspects of Améry's philosophical and ethical position, including dignity, responsibility, resentment, and forgiveness.
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  16.  9
    J. M. Bernstein (2001). Constitutional Patriotism and the Problem of Violence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (S1):97-109.
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  17.  44
    J. M. Bernstein (2001). Marx's Attempt to Leave Philosophy. Philosophical Review 110 (2):275-278.
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  18.  14
    Jerome S. Bernstein (2005). Living in the Borderland: The Evolution of Consciousness and the Challenge of Healing Trauma. Brunner-Routledge.
    Living in the Borderland addresses the evolution of Western consciousness and describes the emergence of the 'Borderland,' a spectrum of reality that is beyond the rational yet is palpable to an increasing number of individuals. Building on Jungian theory, Jerome Bernstein argues that a greater openness to transrational reality experienced by Borderland personalities allows new possibilities for understanding and healing confounding clinical and developmental enigmas. In three sections, this book charts the evolution of Western consciousness, examines the psychological and clinical (...)
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  19.  43
    J. M. Bernstein (2000). Hegel's Ladder: The Ethical Presuppositions of Absolute Knowing. Dialogue 39 (4):803.
  20.  56
    J. M. Bernstein (2008). Human Rights, Unicorns, Etc. Research in Phenomenology 38 (2):303-313.
  21. J. M. Bernstein (2012). Political Modernism : The New, Revolution, and Civil Disobedience in Arendt and Adorno. In Lars Rensmann & Samir Gandesha (eds.), Arendt and Adorno: Political and Philosophical Investigations. Stanford University Press
  22.  8
    Jeffrey Bernstein (2000). The Irreducibility of the Ontic. Idealistic Studies 30 (2):91-105.
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  23.  33
    Jeffrey Bernstein (2004). Philosophy of History as the History of Philosophy in Schelling's System of Transcendental Idealism. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):233-254.
    Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism is usually considered to be either (1) an early Fichtean-influenced work that gives little insight into Schelling’s philosophy or (2) a text focusing on self-consciousness and aesthetics. I argue that Schelling’s System develops a subtle conception of history which originates in a dialogue with Kant and Hegel (concerning the question of teleology) and concludes in proximity to an Idealist version of Spinoza. In this way, Schelling develops a philosophy of history which is, simultaneously, a dialectical (...)
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  24.  9
    J. M. Bernstein (2014). Blind Intuitions: Modernism's Critique of Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (6):1069-1094.
    Adorno contends that something of what we think of knowing and rational agency operate in ways that obscure and deform unique, singular presentations by relegating them to survival-driven interests and needs; hence, in accordance with the presumptions of transcendental idealism, we have come to mistake what are, in effect, historically contingent, species-subjective ways of viewing the world for an objective understanding of the world. And further, this interested understanding of the world is deforming in a more radical way than just (...)
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  25.  30
    J. M. Bernstein (2009). To Be Is to Live, To Be Is to Be Recognized. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 30 (2):357-390.
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  26.  37
    Jeffrey Bernstein (2011). Peter Sloterdijk: Rage and Time: A Psychopolitical Investigation. Mario Wenning (Trans.). [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 44 (2):253-257.
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  27.  14
    J. M. Bernstein (2004). Mimetic Rationality and Material Inference : Adorno and Brandom. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 1:7-23.
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  28.  11
    C. M. Melenovsky & Justin Bernstein (2015). Why Free Market Rights Are Not Basic Liberties. Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (1-2):47-67.
    Most liberals agree that governments should protect certain basic liberties, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of the person. Liberals disagree, however, about whether free market rights should also be protected. By “free market rights,” we mean those rights typically associated with laissez-faire economic systems such as freedom of contract, a right to market returns, and claims to privately own the means of production.We do not use the phrase “economic liberties,” as Tomasi does, because it does (...)
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  29.  6
    Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2011). Child's Play. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):49-64.
    This article explores the influence of Winnicott’s conceptual constellation of early childhood, play, use, transitional phenomena, and transitional object upon Agamben’s thinking of contemporary historical exigency.
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  30.  37
    J. M. Bernstein (2010). Without Sovereignty or Miracles: Reply to Birmingham. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (1):21-31.
    Let me begin with a wisp of political history. According to the Earl of Clarendon, in 1639 the king’s “three kingdoms [were] flourishing in entire peace and universal plenty.”1 Yet by 1642 civil war had broken out, and in 1649 the king was beheaded. What had caused this breakdown of civil and political order, a breakdown that was not localized in England but, in fact, rife throughout Europe—1648 like 1848 was a year of revolutions? Clarendon himself is less than acute (...)
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  31.  17
    James G. Hodge, Leila Barraza, Jennifer Bernstein, Courtney Chu, Veda Collmer, Corey Davis, Megan M. Griest, Monica S. Hammer, Jill Krueger, Kerri McGowan Lowrey & Daniel G. Orenstein (2013). Major Trends in Public Health Law and Practice: A Network National Report. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (3):737-745.
    Since its inception in September 2010, the Network for Public Health Law has responded to hundreds of public health legal technical assistance claims from around the country. Based on a review of these data, a series of major trends in public health practice and the law are analyzed, including issues concerning: the Affordable Care Act, tobacco control, emergency legal preparedness, health information privacy, food policy, vaccination, drug overdose prevention, sports injury law, public health accreditation, and maternal breastfeeding. These and other (...)
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  32. Jay Bernstein (2000). Hegel's Transcendental Induction. Dialogue 39 (4):845-846.
     
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  33.  12
    J. M. Bernstein (2004). Readymades, Monochromes, Etc.: Nominalism and the Paradox of Modernism. Diacritics 32 (1):83-100.
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  34.  10
    J. M. Bernstein (1992). De-Divinization and the Vindication of Everyday Life: Reply to Rorty. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 54 (4):668 - 692.
    This essay originated as a reply to Richard Rorty's ”Habermas, Derrida, and the Functions of Philosophy“. In it, I contest Rorty's deployment of the categories of private selfcreation and the collective political enterprise of increasing freedom, first developed in Contingency, Irony and Solidarity, to demonstrate that the philosophical projects of Habermas and Derrida are complementary rather than antagonistic. The focus of my critique is two-fold: firstly, I contend that so-called critiques of metaphysics are always simutaneously engaging with some form of (...)
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  35.  14
    Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses: Spinoza and Freud on the Traumatic Legacy of Theological-Political Identity. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which is the (...)
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  36.  11
    Jacob G. Bernstein & Edward S. Boyden (2011). Optogenetic Tools for Analyzing the Neural Circuits of Behavior. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):592-600.
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  37.  40
    J. M. Bernstein (2006). Review of Martin Jay, Songs of Experience: Modern American and European Variations on a Universal Theme. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (7).
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  38. Ronald M. Green, Kier Olsen Devries, Judith Bernstein, Kenneth W. Goodman, Robert Kaufmann, Ann A. Kiessling, Susan R. Levin, Susan L. Moss & Carol A. Tauer (2002). Overseeing Research on Therapeutic Cloning: A Private Ethics Board Responds to Its Critics. Hastings Center Report 32 (3):27-33.
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  39.  19
    J. M. Bernstein (2000). Judging Life: From Beauty to Experience. From Kant to Chaim Soutine. Constellations 7 (2):157-177.
  40.  13
    Jeffrey Bernstein (1997). Imagination and Lunacy in Kant's First Critique and Anthropology. Idealistic Studies 27 (3):143-154.
  41.  28
    J. M. Bernstein (2001). Constitutional Patriotism and the Problem of Violence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (S1):97-109.
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  42.  10
    Judy B. Bernstein (2001). The DP Hypothesis: Identifying Clausal Properties in the Nominal Domain. In Mark Baltin & Chris Collins (eds.), The Handbook of Contemporary Syntactic Theory. Blackwell 536--561.
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  43.  18
    Jeffrey A. Bernstein (1999). Balibar, Etienne. Spinoza and Politics. Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):426-428.
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  44.  25
    J. M. Bernstein (1986). Beauty and Truth: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics. Philosophical Books 27 (2):90-91.
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  45. J. Bernstein (1982). Melville, Herman Concept of Ultimate Reality and Meaning In'moby-Dick'. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 5 (2):104-117.
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  46.  10
    Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which is the (...)
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  47.  13
    J. M. Bernstein (2012). Movement! Action! Belief? Angelaki 17 (4):77 - 93.
    Deleuze's philosophy of cinema departs from the standard conception of modernist aesthetics that sees art withdrawing from representation in order to reflect upon the specificity of its medium. While ambitious and influential, Deleuze's attempt fails. Overdetermined by its own metaphysics, it forsakes the real importance of the movies. It is unable to explain how they function and why they matter. This essay pursues three lines of criticism: Deleuze cannot account for the aesthetic specificity of cinema because he deposes the primacy (...)
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  48.  7
    Jay Bernstein (1999). Adorno on Disenchantment: The Scepticism of Enlightened Reason. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:305-328.
    T. W. Adorno's and Max Horkheimer's Dialectic of Enlightenment is fifty years old. Its disconcerting darkness now seems so bound to the time of its writing, one may well wonder if we have anything to learn from it. Are its main lines of argument relevant to our social and philosophical world? Are the losses it records losses we can still recognise as our own?
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  49.  31
    Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2005). On the Interval Between Negative and Positive Philosophy in Schelling's Thought. Review of the Conspiracy of Life: Meditations on Schelling and His Time by Jason M. Wirth. Research in Phenomenology 35 (1):343-350.
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  50. J. M. Bernstein (2002). Re-Enchanting Nature. In Nicholas H. Smith (ed.), Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology. Routledge 277-299.
    [This is a revised and expanded version of an article of the same name published in the Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology, October 2000: 31(3), 277–299.].
     
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