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Profile: James Bogen (University of Pittsburgh)
  1. James Bogen & James Woodward (1988). Saving the Phenomena. Philosophical Review 97 (3):303-352.
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  2.  67
    Jim Bogen (2005). Regularities and Causality; Generalizations and Causal Explanations. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (2):397-420.
    Machamer, Darden, and Craver argue (Mechanism) that causal explanations explain effects by describing the operations of the mechanisms (systems of entities engaging in productive activities) which produce them. One of this paper’s aims is to take advantage of neglected resources of Mechanism to rethink the traditional idea (Regularism) that actual or counterfactual natural regularities are essential to the distinction between causal and non-causal co-occurrences, and that generalizations describing natural regularities are essential components of causal explanations. I think that causal productivity (...)
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  3.  36
    Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness, Part II: Constraining the Semantic Problem. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):137-58.
    The main idea in this series of essays is that subjective awareness depends upon the intralaminar nuclei of each thalmus . This implies that the internal structure and external relations of ILN make subjective awareness possible. An array of material relevant to this proposal was briefly reviewed in Part I . This Part II considers in more detail some semantic aspects and a bit of philosophic background as these pertain to propositions 0, 1, and 2 of Part I. Part II (...)
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  4. James Bogen (2007). The Possibility of Language: Internal Tensions in Wittgenstein's Tractatus (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):167-169.
    James Bogen - The Possibility of Language: Internal Tensions in Wittgenstein's Tractatus - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.1 167-169 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by James Bogen University of Pittsburgh María Cerezo. The Possibility of Language: Internal Tensions in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. CSLI Lecture Notes, 147. Stanford: CSLI, 2005. Pp. xiv + 321. Paper, $30.00. The Possibility of Language is a difficult, painstakingly detailed interpretation and evaluation of central doctrines of (...)
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  5.  21
    Jim Bogen, Empiricism and After.
    Familiar versions of empiricism overemphasize and misconstrue the importance of perceptual experience. I discuss their main shortcomings and sketch an alternative framework for thinking about how human sensory systems contribute to scientific knowledge.
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  6.  34
    Jim Bogen (2004). Analysing Causality: The Opposite of Counterfactual is Factual. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 18 (1):3 – 26.
    Using Jim Woodward's Counterfactual Dependency account as an example, I argue that causal claims about indeterministic systems cannot be satisfactorily analysed as including counterfactual conditionals among their truth conditions because the counterfactuals such accounts must appeal to need not have truth values. Where this happens, counterfactual analyses transform true causal claims into expressions which are not true.
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  7. James Bogen (1966). Identity and Origin. Analysis 26 (5):160 - 165.
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  8.  44
    Jim Bogen & Peter Machamer (2011). Mechanistic Information and Causal Continuity. In Phyllis McKay Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality in the Sciences. OUP Oxford
    Some biological processes move from step to step in a way that cannot be completely understood solely in terms of causes and correlations. This paper develops a notion of mechanistic information that can be used to explain the continuities of such processes. We compare them to processes that do not involve information. We compare our conception of mechanistic information to some familiar notions including Crick’s idea of genetic information, Shannon-Weaver information, and Millikan’s biosemantic information.
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  9.  65
    Jim Bogen, Theory and Observation in Science. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Scientists obtain a great deal of the evidence they use by observingnatural and experimentally generated objects and effects. Much of thestandard philosophical literature on this subject comes from20th century logical positivists and empiricists, theirfollowers, and critics who embraced their issues and accepted some oftheir assumptions even as they objected to specific views. Theirdiscussions of observational evidence tend to focus on epistemologicalquestions about its role in theory testing. This entry follows theirlead even though observational evidence also plays important andphilosophically interesting roles (...)
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  10.  27
    Joseph E. Bogen (1977). Further Discussion of Split Brains and Hemispheric Capabilities. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 28 (September):281-6.
  11.  56
    Jim Bogen (2008). Causally Productive Activities. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):112-123.
    This paper suggests and discusses an answer to the question what distinguishes causal from non-causal or coincidental co-occurrences based on Elizabeth Anscombe’s idea that causality is a highly abstract concept whose meaning derives from our understanding of specific causally productive activities (e.g., pulling, scraping, burning), and her rejection of the assumption that causality can be informatively understood in terms of general regularities of some sort.
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  12.  85
    Jim Bogen (2011). 'Saving the Phenomena' and Saving the Phenomena. Synthese 182 (1):7-22.
    Empiricists claim that in accepting a scientific theory one should not commit oneself to claims about things that are not observable in the sense of registering on human perceptual systems (according to Van Fraassen’s constructive empiricism) or experimental equipment (according to what I call liberal empiricism ). They also claim scientific theories should be accepted or rejected on the basis of how well they save the phenomena in the sense delivering unified descriptions of natural regularities among things that meet their (...)
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  13.  70
    James Bogen (2002). Epistemological Custard Pies From Functional Brain Imaging. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):S59-S71.
    This paper discusses features of an epistemically valuable form of evidence that raise troubles for received and new epistemological treatments of experimental evidence.
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  14.  41
    Jim Bogen (2008). The Hodgkin‐Huxley Equations and the Concrete Model: Comments on Craver, Schaffner, and Weber. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):1034-1046.
    I claim that the Hodgkin‐Huxley (HH) current equations owe a great deal of their importance to their role in bringing results from experiments on squid giant action preparations to bear on the study of the action potential in other neurons in other in vitro and in vivo environments. I consider ideas from Weber and Craver about the role of Coulomb’s and other fundamental equations in explaining the action potential and in HH’s development of their equations. Also, I offer an embellishment (...)
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  15. Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness, Part I: An Overview. Consciousness and Cognition 4:52-62.
  16. J. Bogen (2007). Review: Tracking Truth. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (462):472-478.
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  17.  65
    James Bogen (1978). Metaphors as Theory Fragments. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (2):177-188.
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  18.  5
    Jim Bogen (2005). Regularities and Causality; Generalizations and Causal Explanations. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (2):397-420.
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  19.  44
    James Bogen & Jim Woodward (2005). Evading the Irs. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 86 (1):233-268.
    'IRS' is our term for the logical empiricist idea that the best way to understand the epistemic bearing of observational evidence on scientific theories is to model it in terms of Inferential Relations among Sentences representing the evidence, and sentences representing hypotheses the evidence is used to evaluate. Developing ideas from our earlier work, including 'Saving the Phenomena'(Phil Review 97, 1988, p.303-52 )we argue that the bearing of observational evidence on theory depends upon causal connections and error characteristics of the (...)
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  20.  40
    Jim Bogen & Jim Woodward (1992). Observations, Theories and the Evolution of the Human Spirit. Philosophy of Science 59 (4):590-611.
    Standard philosophical discussions of theory-ladeness assume that observational evidence consists of perceptual outputs (or reports of such outputs) that are sentential or propositional in structure. Theory-ladeness is conceptualized as having to do with logical or semantical relationships between such outputs or reports and background theories held by observers. Using the recent debate between Fodor and Churchland as a point of departure, we propose an alternative picture in which much of what serves as evidence in science is not perceptual outputs or (...)
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  21.  30
    James Bogen (1989). On Being and Saying: Essays for Richard Cartwright. Philosophical Books 30 (2):92-94.
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  22. Joseph E. Bogen (1968). The Other Side of the Brain: An Appositional Mind. Bulletin of the Los Angeles Neurological Society 34:135-62.
  23.  53
    Joseph E. Bogen (1997). Some Neurophysiologic Aspects of Consciousness. Seminars in Neurology 17:95-103.
  24.  16
    Roger W. Sperry, Michael S. Gazzaniga & Joseph E. Bogen (1969). Interhemispheric Relationships: The Neocortical Commissures; Syndromes of Hemisphere Disconnection. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland 4--273.
  25.  22
    Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness: 1. An Overview. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):52-62.
    How certain neural mechanisms momentarily endow with the subjective awareness percepts and affects represented elsewhere is more likely to be clarified when structures essential to Mc are identified. The loss of C with bilateral thalmic lesions involving the intralaminar nuclei contrasts with retention of C after large cortical ablations depriving C of specific contents. A role of ILN in the perception of primitive sensations is suggested by their afference of directly ascending pathways. A role for ILN in awareness of cortical (...)
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  26.  8
    James Bogen (1988). Human Knowledge. Teaching Philosophy 11 (2):183-185.
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  27.  15
    James Bogen (1990). The Criterion of Truth: Essays Written in Honour of George Kerlerd Together with a Text and Translation (with Annotations) of Ptolemy's on the Criterion and Hegemonikon. Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):324-327.
  28.  16
    James Bogen (2002). Experiment and Observation. In Peter K. Machamer & Michael Silberstein (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge: Blackwell 128--148.
  29.  13
    James Bogen (1987). Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy. Vol. I, 1985. Ancient Philosophy 7:256-258.
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  30.  10
    James Bogen (2001). Functional Imaging Evidence: Some Epistemic Hotspots. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press 173--199.
  31.  10
    Jim Bogen (2010). Noise in the World. Philosophy of Science 77 (5):778-791.
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  32.  7
    James Bogen (1994). The Nature of All Being. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):643-664.
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  33.  34
    James Bogen (1991). Aristotelian Contraries. Topoi 10 (1):53-66.
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  34.  31
    James Bogen (1962). Kierkegaard and the 'Teleological Suspension of the Ethical'. Inquiry 5 (1-4):305-317.
    This article discusses the claim made by Kierkegaard in Fear and Trembling that the story of Abraham involves a ?teleological suspension of the ethical?. It tries to show that this claim is intelligible and plausible when considered within the context of a philosophical position which views morality as a system of duties.
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  35.  12
    James Bogen (2008). The Criterion of Truth. Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):324-327.
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  36.  42
    James Bogen (1961). Remarks on the Kierkegaard-Hegel Controversy. Synthese 13 (4):372 - 389.
  37.  16
    James Bogen (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments and an Abstract: Comments on "the Sociology of Knowledge About Child Abuse". Noûs 22 (1):65-66.
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  38.  29
    James Bogen & Morton Beckner (1979). An Empirical Refutation of Cartesian Scepticism. Mind 88 (351):351-369.
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  39.  9
    James Bogen (1981). Recent Wittgensteiniana. Teaching Philosophy 4 (1):67-74.
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  40.  30
    Jim Bogen (2011). Occasion-Sensitivity – Charles Travis. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):196-201.
  41.  5
    James Bogen (1982). Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Teaching Philosophy 5 (4):325-326.
  42.  12
    Jim Bogen (2008). The New Mechanical Philosophy. Metascience 17 (1):33-41.
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  43.  7
    James Bogen & J. Mcguire (1986). Aristotle’s Great Clock: Necessity, Possibility and the Motion of the Cosmos in De Caelo I.12. Philosophy Research Archives 12:387-448.
    This paper offers a detailed account of arguments in De Caelo I by which Aristotle tried to demonstrate the necessity of the perpetual existence and the perpetual rotation of the cosmos. On our interpretation, Aristotle’s arguments are naturalistic. Instead of being based on rules of logic and language, they depend, we argue, on natural science theories about abilities , e.g., to move and to change, which things have by nature and about the conditions under which these abilities can be exercised. (...)
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  44.  10
    Jim Bogen (2013). Aristides Baltas.Peeling Potatoes or Grinding Lenses: Spinoza and Young Wittgenstein Converse on Immanence and Its Logic. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012. Pp. Vii+290. $65.00. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):352-356.
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  45.  32
    James Bogen & Daniel M. Farrell (1978). Freedom and Happiness in Mill's Defence of Liberty. Philosophical Quarterly 28 (113):325-338.
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  46.  34
    James Bogen (1985). Traditional Epistemology and Naturalistic Replies to its Skeptical Critics. Synthese 64 (2):195 - 224.
  47.  16
    James Bogen & J. E. McGuire (1986). Aristotle's Great Clock. Philosophy Research Archives 12:387-448.
    This paper offers a detailed account of arguments in De Caelo I by which Aristotle tried to demonstrate the necessity of the perpetual existence and the perpetual rotation of the cosmos. On our interpretation, Aristotle’s arguments are naturalistic. Instead of being based (as many have thought) on rules of logic and language, they depend, we argue, on natural science theories about abilities (δυνάμεις), e.g., to move and to change, which things have by nature and about the conditions under which these (...)
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  48.  33
    James Bogen (1974). Moravcsik on Explanation. Synthese 28 (1):19 - 25.
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  49. James Bogen (1984). Leonard Goddard and Brenda Judge, Eds., The Metaphysics of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 4 (4):148-149.
     
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  50.  6
    Joseph E. Bogen (1994). Descartes' Fundamental Mistake: Introspective Singularity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):175.
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