Search results for 'J. Brefczynski-Lewis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. H. J. & Harry A. Lewis (1991). Peter Geach: Philosophical Encounters. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (165):516.score: 1399.9
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  2. H. J., G. Floistad, Norman Kretzmann, Barbara Ensign Kretzmann, Graham Priest, Richard Sylvan, Jean Norman, Harry A. Lewis, John Stuart Mill, Tim Gray, Fred R. Berger, Noel Carroll, W. B. Gallie, Marilyn McCord Adams & Robert Merrihew Adams (1991). Philosophy and Science in the Middle Ages.The Sophismata of Richard Kilvington.Paraconsistent Logic: Essays on the Inconsistent.Peter Geach: Philosophical Encounters.Miscellaneous Writings.Freedom.Freedom, Rights and Pornography.The Philosophy of Horror or Paradoxes of the Heart.Understanding War.The Problem of Evil. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 41 (165):514.score: 1200.0
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  3. Paul Cartledge, W. M. Calder Iii, R. S. Smith, J. Vaio & George Cornewall Lewis (2003). Teaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried MüllerTeaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried Muller. Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:262.score: 210.0
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  4. J. L. Lewis (1970). Semantic Processing of Unattended Messages Using Dichotic Listening. J Exp Psychol 85 (2):225-8.score: 150.0
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  5. P. J. Lewis (1982). Focus: Current Issues in Medical Ethics: The Drawbacks of Research Ethics Committees. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (2):61-64.score: 150.0
    Research ethics committees, while in many ways an excellent innovation, do have some drawbacks. This paper examines three of these. The first problem of such committees is that their approval of specific projects in their own institutions acquires intrinsic value. The second problem relates to the possible devolution of responsibility from the investigator to the committee. The committee approves, the investigator feels relieved of some responsibility and things can be done to patients which neither the committee nor the investigator might (...)
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  6. J. O. Urmson & H. D. Lewis (1957). Contemporary British Philosophy (Third Series). Philosophical Quarterly 7 (28):267.score: 140.0
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  7. Peter J. Lewis (2010). Probability in Everettian Quantum Mechanics. Manuscrito 33:285--306.score: 120.0
    The main difficulty facing no-collapse theories of quantum mechanics in the Everettian tradition concerns the role of probability within a theory in which every possible outcome of a measurement actually occurs. The problem is two-fold: First, what do probability claims mean within such a theory? Second, what ensures that the probabilities attached to measurement outcomes match those of standard quantum mechanics? Deutsch has recently proposed a decision-theoretic solution to the second problem, according to which agents are rationally required to weight (...)
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  8. Peter J. Lewis (2001). Why the Pessimistic Induction is a Fallacy. Synthese 129 (3):371--380.score: 120.0
    Putnam and Laudan separately argue that the falsity of past scientific theories gives us reason to doubt the truth of current theories. Their arguments have been highly influential, and have generated a significant literature over the past couple of decades. Most of this literature attempts to defend scientific realism by attacking the historical evidence on which the premises of the relevant argument are based. However, I argue that both Putnam's and Laudan's arguments are fallacious, and hence attacking their premises is (...)
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  9. Peter J. Lewis (2000). What is It Like to Be Schrödinger's Cat? Analysis 60 (265):22–29.score: 120.0
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  10. Peter J. Lewis (2007). Empty Waves in Bohmian Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (4):787 - 803.score: 120.0
    There is a recurring line of argument in the literature to the effect that Bohm's theory fails to solve the measurement problem. I show that this argument fails in all its variants. Hence Bohm's theory, whatever its drawbacks, at least succeeds in solving the measurement problem. I briefly discuss a similar argument that has been raised against the GRW theory.
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  11. Peter J. Lewis (2010). Credence and Self-Location. Synthese 175 (3):369-382.score: 120.0
    All parties to the Sleeping Beauty debate agree that it shows that some cherished principle of rationality has to go. Thirders think that it is Conditionalization and Reflection that must be given up or modified; halfers think that it is the Principal Principle. I offer an analysis of the Sleeping Beauty puzzle that allows us to retain all three principles. In brief, I argue that Sleeping Beauty’s credence in the uncentered proposition that the coin came up heads should be 1/2, (...)
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  12. Peter J. Lewis (2003). Four Strategies for Dealing with the Counting Anomaly in Spontaneous Collapse Theories of Quantum Mechanics. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 17 (2):137 – 142.score: 120.0
    A few years ago, I argued that according to spontaneous collapse theories of quantum mechanics, arithmetic applies to macroscopic objects only as an approximation. Several authors have written articles defending spontaneous collapse theories against this charge, including Bassi and Ghirardi, Clifton and Monton, and now Frigg. The arguments of these authors are all different and all ingenious, but in the end I think that none of them succeeds, for reasons I elaborate here. I suggest a fourth line of response, based (...)
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  13. Peter J. Lewis (2007). Quantum Sleeping Beauty. Analysis 67 (293):59-65.score: 120.0
    The Sleeping Beauty paradox in epistemology and the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics both raise problems concerning subjective probability assignments. Furthermore, there are striking parallels between the two cases; in both cases personal experience has a branching structure, and in both cases the agent loses herself among the branches. However, the treatment of probability is very different in the two cases, for no good reason that I can see. Suppose, then, that we adopt the same treatment of probability in each (...)
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  14. Peter J. Lewis (1997). Quantum Mechanics, Orthogonality, and Counting. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (3):313-328.score: 120.0
    In quantum mechanics it is usually assumed that mutually exclusives states of affairs must be represented by orthogonal vectors. Recent attempts to solve the measurement problem, most notably the GRW theory, require the relaxation of this assumption. It is shown that a consequence of relaxing this assumption is that arithmatic does not apply to ordinary macroscopic objects. It is argued that such a radical move is unwarranted given the current state of understanding of the foundations of quantum mechanics.
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  15. Peter J. Lewis (2010). A Note on the Doomsday Argument. Analysis 70 (1):27-30.score: 120.0
    I argue that the Doomsday argument fails because it fails to take into account the lesson of the Sleeping Beauty puzzle.
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  16. Peter J. Lewis (2007). How Bohm's Theory Solves the Measurement Problem. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):749-760.score: 120.0
    I examine recent arguments based on functionalism that claim to show that Bohm's theory fails to solve the measurement problem, or if it does so, it is only because it reduces to a form of the many-worlds theory. While these arguments reveal some interesting features of Bohm's theory, I contend that they do not undermine the distinctive Bohmian solution to the measurement problem. ‡I would like to thank Harvey Brown, Martin Thomson-Jones, and David Wallace for helpful discussions. †To contact the (...)
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  17. Peter J. Hills, Magda A. Werno & Michael B. Lewis (2011). Sad People Are More Accurate at Face Recognition Than Happy People. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1502-1517.score: 120.0
  18. Peter J. Lewis (2004). Life in Configuration Space. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):713-729.score: 120.0
    This paper investigates the tenability of wavefunction realism, according to which the quantum mechanical wavefunction is not just a convenient predictive tool, but is a real entity figuring in physical explanations of our measurement results. An apparent difficulty with this position is that the wavefunction exists in a many-dimensional configuration space, whereas the world appears to us to be three-dimensional. I consider the arguments that have been given for and against the tenability of wavefunction realism, and note that both the (...)
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  19. Peter J. Lewis (2006). Conspiracy Theories of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):359-381.score: 120.0
    It has long been recognized that a local hidden variable theory of quantum mechanics can in principle be constructed, provided one is willing to countenance pre-measurement correlations between the properties of measured systems and measuring devices. However, this ‘conspiratorial’ approach is typically dismissed out of hand. In this article I examine the justification for dismissing conspiracy theories of quantum mechanics. I consider the existing arguments against such theories, and find them to be less than conclusive. I suggest a more powerful (...)
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  20. Peter J. Lewis, Deutsch on Quantum Decision Theory.score: 120.0
    A major problem facing no-collapse interpretations of quantum mechanics in the tradition of Everett is how to understand the probabilistic axiom of quantum mechanics (the Born rule) in the context of a deterministic theory in which every outcome of a measurement occurs. Deutsch claims to derive a decision-theoretic analogue of the Born rule from the non-probabilistic part of quantum mechanics and some non-probabilistic axioms of classical decision theory, and hence concludes that no probabilistic axiom is needed. I argue that Deutsch’s (...)
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  21. Peter J. Lewis (2009). Probability, Self‐Location, and Quantum Branching. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):1009-1019.score: 120.0
    The main problem with the many‐worlds theory is that it is not clear how the notion of probability should be understood in a theory in which every possible outcome of a measurement actually occurs. In this paper, I argue for the following theses concerning the many‐worlds theory: (1) If probability can be applied at all to measurement outcomes, it must function as a measure of an agent’s self‐location uncertainty. (2) Such probabilities typically violate (...)
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  22. Peter J. Lewis (2007). Uncertainty and Probability for Branching Selves. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (1):1-14.score: 120.0
    Everettian accounts of quantum mechanics entail that people branch; every possible result of a measurement actually occurs, and I have one successor for each result. Is there room for probability in such an account? The prima facie answer is no; there are no ontic chances here, and no ignorance about what will happen. But since any adequate quantum mechanical theory must make probabilistic predictions, much recent philosophical labor has gone into trying to construct an account of probability for branching selves. (...)
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  23. Peter J. Lewis (2013). The Doomsday Argument and the Simulation Argument. Synthese 190 (18):4009-4022.score: 120.0
    The Simulation Argument and the Doomsday Argument share certain structural similarities, and hence are often discussed together (Bostrom 2003, Aranyosi 2004, Richmond 2008, Bostrom and Kulczycki 2011). Both are cases where reflecting on one’s location among a set of possibilities yields a counter-intuitive conclusion—in one case that the end of humankind is closer than you initially thought, and in the second case that it is more likely than you initially thought that you are living in a computer simulation. Indeed, the (...)
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  24. G. Illtyd Lewis (1958). The Reason of State and the Greatness of Cities. By Giovanni Botero, Translated From the Italian by P. J. Waley, with an Introduction by D. P. WALEY. (Routledge & Kegan Paul. Pp. 298. Price 32s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 33 (127):372-.score: 120.0
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  25. Peter J. Lewis, Credence for Whom?score: 120.0
    There is an important sense in which an agent’s credences are universal: while they reflect an agent’s own judgments, those judgments apply equally to everyone’s bets. This point, while uncontentious, has been overlooked; people automatically assume that credences concern an agent’s own bets, perhaps just because of the name “subjective” that is typically applied to this account of belief. This oversight has had unfortunate consequences for recent epistemology, in particular concerning the Sleeping Beauty case and its myriad variants.
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  26. Peter J. Lewis, A Note on the Simulation Argument.score: 120.0
    The point of this note is to compare the Doomsday Argument to the Simulation Argument. The latter, I maintain, is a better argument than the former.
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  27. D. M. Lewis (1977). 1) D. J. Mosley: Envoys and Diplomacy in Ancient Greece (Historia-Einzelschrift 22). Pp. 97. Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner, 1973. Paper, DM. 14.2) Sir Frank Adcock and D. J. Mosley: Diplomacy in Ancient Greece. Pp. 287; 2 Maps. London: Thames & Hudson, 1975. Cloth, £6·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (01):134-135.score: 120.0
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  28. Peter J. Lewis (2006). GRW: A Case Study in Quantum Ontology. Philosophy Compass 1 (2):224–244.score: 120.0
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  29. William J. Mitchell, Phillip V. Lewis & N. L. Reinsch (1992). Bank Ethics: An Exploratory Study of Ethical Behaviors and Perceptions in Small, Local Banks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (3):197 - 205.score: 120.0
    This article addresses five research questions: What specific behaviors are described in the literature as ethical or unethical? What percentage of business people are believed to be guilty of unethical behavior? What specific unethical behaviors have been observed by bank employees? How serious are the behaviors? Are experiences and attitudes affected by demographics? Conclusions suggest: There are seventeen categories of behavior, and that they are heavily skewed toward internal behaviors. Younger employees have a higher level of ethical consciousness than older (...)
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  30. D. M. Lewis (1981). E. J. Bickerman: Chronology of the Ancient World. (Revised Edition). (Aspects of Greek and Roman Life.) Pp. 223; 8 Text-Figures. London: Thames & Hudson, 1980. Paper, £4.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 31 (02):309-.score: 120.0
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  31. A. D. Ritchie, Karl Britton, M. Macdonald, Alice Ambrose, H. D. Lewis, J. R. Jones & A. C. Ewing (1946). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 55 (220):357-377.score: 120.0
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  32. D. M. Lewis (1969). E. J. Bickerman: Chronology of the Ancient World. Pp. 253; 8 Figs. London: Thames and Hudson, 1968. Cloth, 57s. 6d. Net. The Classical Review 19 (01):110-111.score: 120.0
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  33. Peter J. Lewis (2013). Retrocausal Quantum Mechanics: Maudlin's Challenge Revisited. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (4):442-449.score: 120.0
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  34. Peter J. Lewis (2005). Interpreting Spontaneous Collapse Theories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 36 (1):165-180.score: 120.0
    Spontaneous collapse theories of quantum mechanics require an interpretation if their claim to solve the measurement problem is to be vindicated. The most straightforward interpretation rule, the fuzzy link, generates a violation of common sense known as the counting anomaly. Recently, a consensus has developed that the mass density link provides an appropriate interpretation of spontaneous collapse theories that avoids the counting anomaly. In this paper, I argue that the mass density link violates common sense in just as striking a (...)
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  35. Peter J. Lewis (2009). Reply to Papineau and Durà-Vilà. Analysis 69 (1):86-89.score: 120.0
    I argued that anyone who adopts the Everettian approach to the foundations of quantum mechanics must also accept the (unpopular) ‘halfer’ solution to the Sleeping Beauty puzzle. Papineau and Durà-Vilà have responded with an argument that it is perfectly cogent both to be an Everettian and to accept the (popular) ‘thirder’ solution to Sleeping Beauty. Here I attempt to rebut their argument, and to clarify my original position.
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  36. Austin Duncan-Jones, G. B. Keene, G. C. J. Midgley, Karl Britton, G. E. L. Owen, H. D. Lewis, Edna Daitz, J. L. Ackrill, Martha Kneale, Frederick C. Copleston, J. O. Urmson, J. P. Corbett & R. I. Aaron (1953). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 62 (246):259-288.score: 120.0
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  37. Peter J. Lewis (2003). Quantum Mechanics and Ordinary Language: The Fuzzy Link. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1437-1446.score: 120.0
    It is widely acknowledged that the link between quantum language and ordinary language must be "fuzzier" than the traditional eigenstate-eigenvalue link. In the context of spontaneous-collapse theories, Albert and Loewer (1996) argue that the form of this fuzzy link is a matter of convention, and can be freely chosen to minimize anomalies for those theories. I defend the position that the form of the link is empirical, and could be such as to render collapse theories idle. This means that (...)
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  38. Andrew J. Lewis & Gregory Tooley (2009). Disorganized Attachment and Reproductive Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):35-36.score: 120.0
    Del Giudice provides an extension of the life history theory of attachment that incorporates emerging data suggestive of sex differences in avoidant male and preoccupied female attachment patterns emerging in middle childhood. This commentary considers the place of disorganized attachment within this theory and why male children may be more prone to disorganized attachment by drawing on Trivers's parental investment theory.
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  39. M. Lewis & J. Havil (eds.) (1999). Handbook of Emotions. Guilford Press.score: 120.0
    Now in a thoroughly revised and expanded third edition, this authoritative Handbook reviews current knowledge about all aspects of emotion and its role in human ...
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  40. Andrew Lewis (1990). K. J. M. Smith, James Fitzjames Stephen, Portrait of a Victorian Rationalist, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988, Pp. 338. [REVIEW] Utilitas 2 (01):159-.score: 120.0
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  41. Andrea Cheshire, Linden J. Ball & Charlie N. Lewis (2008). Analogy as Relational Priming: The Challenge of Self-Reflection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):381-382.score: 120.0
    Despite its strengths, Leech et al.'s model fails to address the important benefits that derive from self-explanation and task feedback in analogical reasoning development. These components encourage explicit, self-reflective processes that do not necessarily link to knowledge accretion. We wonder, therefore, what mechanisms can be included within a connectionist framework to model self-reflective involvement and its beneficial consequences.
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  42. H. D. Lewis (1953). Religion and the Modern Mind. By W. T. Stace. (New York: J. B. Lippincott Co. Pp. 285. Price $3.75.). Philosophy 28 (107):374-.score: 120.0
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  43. R. G. Lewis (1977). Aspects of Romanization in Etruria P. Bruun, P. Hohti, J. Kaimio, E. Michelsen, M. Nielsen, E. Ruoff: Studies in the Romanization of Etruria: Acta Lnstituti Rotnani Finlandiae, Vol. V. Pp. 518; 65 Photographs, 4 Folding Charts. Rome: Bardi, 1975. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (02):221-223.score: 120.0
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  44. Peter J. Lewis (2003). Counting Marbles: A Reply to Critics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (1):165-170.score: 120.0
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  45. D. M. Lewis (1969). Daniel J. Geagan: The Athenian Constitution After Sulla. (Hesperia, Supplement Xii.) Pp. Xiii+231; 7 Plates. Princeton, N.J.: American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1967. Paper, $10. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 19 (01):111-112.score: 120.0
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  46. D. M. Lewis (1980). R.E. Wycherley: The Stones of Athens. Pp. Xviii + 293; 78 Photographs and Drawings. Princeton N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1978. £18·70 (Paper, £9·40). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 30 (01):163-164.score: 120.0
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  47. D. M. Lewis (1983). T. J. Quinn: Athens and Samos, Lesbos and Chios: 478–404 B.C. (Publications of the Faculty of Arts, University of Manchester, 27.) Pp. 105. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1981. £14.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (01):146-.score: 120.0
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