126 found
Order:
  1.  40
    J. Butterfield (2011). Less is Different: Emergence and Reduction Reconciled. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 41 (6):1065-1135.
    This is a companion to another paper. Together they rebut two widespread philosophical doctrines about emergence. The first, and main, doctrine is that emergence is incompatible with reduction. The second is that emergence is supervenience; or more exactly, supervenience without reduction.In the other paper, I develop these rebuttals in general terms, emphasising the second rebuttal. Here I discuss the situation in physics, emphasising the first rebuttal. I focus on limiting relations between theories and illustrate my claims with four examples, each (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   26 citations  
  2.  32
    Sebastian De Haro, Nicholas Teh & Jeremy Butterfield, Comparing Dualities and Gauge Symmetries.
    We discuss some aspects of the relation between dualities and gauge symmetries. Both of these ideas are of course multi-faceted, and we confine ourselves to making two points. Both points are about dualities in string theory, and both have the ‘flavour’ that two dual theories are ‘closer in content’ than you might think. For both points, we adopt a simple conception of a duality as an ‘isomorphism’ between theories: more precisely, as appropriate bijections between the two theories’ sets of states (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. J. Butterfield (2011). Emergence, Reduction and Supervenience: A Varied Landscape. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 41 (6):920-959.
    This is one of two papers about emergence, reduction and supervenience. It expounds these notions and analyses the general relations between them. The companion paper analyses the situation in physics, especially limiting relations between physical theories. I shall take emergence as behaviour that is novel and robust relative to some comparison class. I shall take reduction as deduction using appropriate auxiliary definitions. And I shall take supervenience as a weakening of reduction, viz. to allow infinitely long definitions. The overall claim (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  4. A. Caulton & J. Butterfield (2012). On Kinds of Indiscernibility in Logic and Metaphysics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (1):27-84.
    Using the Hilbert-Bernays account as a spring-board, we first define four ways in which two objects can be discerned from one another, using the non-logical vocabulary of the language concerned. Because of our use of the Hilbert-Bernays account, these definitions are in terms of the syntax of the language. But we also relate our definitions to the idea of permutations on the domain of quantification, and their being symmetries. These relations turn out to be subtle---some natural conjectures about them are (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  5. Adam Caulton & Jeremy Butterfield (2012). Symmetries and Paraparticles as a Motivation for Structuralism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (2):233-285.
    This article develops an analogy proposed by Stachel between general relativity (GR) and quantum mechanics (QM) as regards permutation invariance. Our main idea is to overcome Pooley's criticism of the analogy by appeal to paraparticles. In GR, the equations are (the solution space is) invariant under diffeomorphisms permuting spacetime points. Similarly, in QM the equations are invariant under particle permutations. Stachel argued that this feature—a theory's ‘not caring which point, or particle, is which’—supported a structuralist ontology. Pooley criticizes this analogy: (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  6.  81
    Jeremy Butterfield (2006). Against Pointillisme About Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (4):709-753.
    This paper forms part of a wider campaign: to deny em pointillisme. That is the doctrine that a physical theory's fundamental quantities are defined at points of space or of spacetime, and represent intrinsic properties of such points or point-sized objects located there; so that properties of spatial or spatiotemporal regions and their material contents are determined by the point-by-point facts. More specifically, this paper argues against pointillisme about the concept of velocity in classical mechanics; especially against proposals by Tooley, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  7.  20
    Nazim Bouatta & Jeremy Butterfield (2015). On Emergence in Gauge Theories at the ’T Hooft Limit‘. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5 (1):55-87.
    Quantum field theories are notoriously difficult to understand, physically as well as philosophically. The aim of this paper is to contribute to a better conceptual understanding of gauge quantum field theories, such as quantum chromodynamics, by discussing a famous physical limit, the ’t Hooft limit, in which the theory concerned often simplifies. The idea of the limit is that the number N of colours goes to infinity. The simplifications that can happen in this limit, and that we will consider, are: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8. Jeremy Butterfield & Chris Isham (2001). Spacetime and the Philosophical Challenge of Quantum Gravity. In Physics Meets Philosophy at the Panck Scale. Cambridge University Press
    We survey some philosophical aspects of the search for a quantum theory of gravity, emphasising how quantum gravity throws into doubt the treatment of spacetime common to the two `ingredient theories' (quantum theory and general relativity), as a 4-dimensional manifold equipped with a Lorentzian metric. After an introduction (Section 1), we briefly review the conceptual problems of the ingredient theories (Section 2) and introduce the enterprise of quantum gravity (Section 3). We then describe how three main research programmes in quantum (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  9.  60
    Jeremy Butterfield (2007). Stochastic Einstein Locality Revisited. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (4):805 - 867.
    I discuss various formulations of stochastic Einstein locality (SEL), which is a version of the idea of relativistic causality, that is, the idea that influences propagate at most as fast as light. SEL is similar to Reichenbach's Principle of the Common Cause (PCC), and Bell's Local Causality. My main aim is to discuss formulations of SEL for a fixed background spacetime. I previously argued that SEL is violated by the outcome dependence shown by Bell correlations, both in quantum mechanics and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  10.  88
    Jeremy Butterfield (2001). Some Worlds of Quantum Theory. In R. J. Russell, N. Murphy & C. J. Isham (eds.), Quantum Physics and Divine Action. Vatican Observatory Publications 111--140.
    Abstract: This paper assesses the Everettian approach to the measurement problem, especially the version of that approach advocated by Simon Saunders and David Wallace. I emphasise conceptual, indeed metaphysical, aspects rather than technical ones; but I include an introductory exposition of decoherence. In particular, I discuss whether---as these authors maintain---it is acceptable to have no precise definition of 'branch' (in the Everettian kind of sense). (A version of this paper will appear in a CTNS/Vatican Observatory volume on Quantum Theory and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  11. Jeremy Butterfield (1992). Bell's Theorem: What It Takes. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (1):41-83.
    I compare deterministic and stochastic hidden variable models of the Bell experiment, exphasising philosophical distinctions between the various ways of combining conditionals and probabilities. I make four main claims. (1) Under natural assumptions, locality as it occurs in these models is equivalent to causal independence, as analysed (in the spirit of Lewis) in terms of probabilities and conditionals. (2) Stochastic models are indeed more general than deterministic ones. (3) For factorizable stochastic models, relativity's lack of superluminal causation does not favour (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  12.  17
    Jeremy Butterfield, On Time in Quantum Physics.
    First, I briefly review the different conceptions of time held by three rival interpretations of quantum theory: the collapse of the wave-packet, the pilot-wave interpretation, and the Everett interpretation. Then I turn to a much less controversial task: to expound the recent understanding of the time-energy uncertainty principle, and indeed of uncertainty principles in general, that has been established by such authors as Busch, Hilgevoord and Uffink. Although this may at first seem a narrow topic, I point out connections to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  13. Jeremy Butterfield (1989). The Hole Truth. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (1):1-28.
  14. Jeremy Butterfield & Chris Isham (1999). On the Emergence of Time in Quantum Gravity. In The Arguments of Time. Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press 111--168.
    We discuss from a philosophical perspective the way in which the normal concept of time might be said to `emerge' in a quantum theory of gravity. After an introduction, we briefly discuss the notion of emergence, without regard to time. We then introduce the search for a quantum theory of gravity ; and review some general interpretative issues about space, time and matter. We then discuss the emergence of time in simple quantum geometrodynamics, and in the Euclidean approach. Section 6 (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  15.  32
    Sebastian de Haro, Daniel Mayerson & Jeremy Butterfield, Conceptual Aspects of Gauge/Gravity Duality.
    We give an introductory review of gauge/gravity duality, and associated ideas of holography, emphasising the conceptual aspects. The opening Sections gather the ingredients, viz. anti-de Sitter spacetime, conformal field theory and string theory, that we need for presenting, in Section 5, the central and original example: Maldacena's AdS/CFT correspondence. Sections 6 and 7 develop the ideas of this example, also in applications to condensed matter systems, QCD, and hydrodynamics. Sections 8 and 9 discuss the possible extensions of holographic ideas to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  19
    Jeremy Butterfield & Nazim Bouatta, Emergence and Reduction Combined in Phase Transitions.
    In another paper, one of us argued that emergence and reduction are compatible, and presented four examples illustrating both. The main purpose of this paper is to develop this position for the example of phase transitions. We take it that emergence involves behaviour that is novel compared with what is expected: often, what is expected from a theory of the system's microscopic constituents. We take reduction as deduction, aided by appropriate definitions. Then the main idea of our reconciliation of emergence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17. Jeremy Butterfield & Chris Isham (2001). Physics Meets Philosophy at the Panck Scale. Cambridge University Press.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  18.  53
    Jeremy Butterfield (2006). Against Pointillisme About Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (4):709-753.
    This paper forms part of a wider campaign: to deny pointillisme, the doctrine that a physical theory's fundamental quantities are defined at points of space or of spacetime, and represent intrinsic properties of such points or point-sized objects located there; so that properties of spatial or spatiotemporal regions and their material contents are determined by the point-by-point facts. More specifically, this paper argues against pointillisme about the concept of velocity in classical mechanics; especially against proposals by Tooley, Robinson and Lewis. (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  19.  14
    George Fleming & Jeremy Butterfield (1999). Strange Positions. In From Physics to Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  20.  29
    Jeremy Butterfield, Our Mathematical Universe?
    This is a discussion of some themes in Max Tegmark’s recent book, Our Mathematical Universe. It was written as a review for Plus Magazine, the online magazine of the UK’s national mathematics education and outreach project, the Mathematics Millennium Project. Since some of the discussion---about symmetry breaking, and Pythagoreanism in the philosophy of mathematics---went beyond reviewing Tegmark’s book, the material was divided into three online articles. This version combines those three articles, and adds some other material, in particular a brief (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  60
    Jeremy Butterfield (2014). Reduction, Emergence, and Renormalization. Journal of Philosophy 111 (1):5-49.
    In previous work, I described several examples combining reduction and emergence: where reduction is understood a la Ernest Nagel, and emergence is understood as behaviour that is novel. Here, my aim is again to reconcile reduction and emergence, for a case which is apparently more problematic than those I treated before: renormalization. My main point is that renormalizability being a generic feature at accessible energies gives us a conceptually unified family of Nagelian reductions. That is worth saying since philosophers tend (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  51
    Jeremy Butterfield (2007). Reconsidering Relativistic Causality. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21 (3):295 – 328.
    I discuss the idea of relativistic causality, i.e., the requirement that causal processes or signals can propagate only within the light-cone. After briefly locating this requirement in the philosophy of causation, my main aim is to draw philosophers' attention to the fact that it is subtle, indeed problematic, in relativistic quantum physics: there are scenarios in which it seems to fail. I set aside two such scenarios, which are familiar to philosophers of physics: the pilot-wave approach, and the Newton-Wigner representation. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  23.  54
    Jeremy Butterfield (1993). Interpretation and Identity in Quantum Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 24 (3):443--76.
  24.  45
    Jeremy Butterfield (2014). On Under-Determination in Cosmology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (1):57-69.
    I discuss how modern cosmology illustrates under-determination of theoretical hypotheses by data, in ways that are different from most philosophical discussions. I emphasise cosmology's concern with what data could in principle be collected by a single observer ; and I give a broadly sceptical discussion of cosmology's appeal to the cosmological principle as a way of breaking the under-determination .I confine most of the discussion to the history of the observable universe from about one second after the Big Bang, as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25. Jeremy Butterfield (1992). David Lewis Meets John Bell. Philosophy of Science 59 (1):26-43.
    The violation of the Bell inequality means that measurement-results in the two wings of the experiment cannot be screened off from one another, in the sense of Reichenbach. But does this mean that there is causation between the results? I argue that it does, according to Lewis's counterfactual analysis of causation and his associated views. The reason lies in his doctrine that chances evolve by conditionalization on intervening history. This doctrine collapses the distinction between the conditional probabilities that are used (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  26.  44
    Jeremy Butterfield (2012). Underdetermination in Cosmology: An Invitation. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):1-18.
    I discuss how modern cosmology illustrates underdetermination of theoretical hypotheses by data, in ways that are different from most philosophical discussions. I confine the discussion to the history of the observable universe from about one second after the Big Bang, as described by the mainstream cosmological model: in effect, what cosmologists in the early 1970s dubbed the ‘standard model’, as elaborated since then. Or rather, the discussion is confined to a (very!) few aspects of that history. I emphasize that despite (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  64
    Jeremy Butterfield (2002). The End of Time? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53:289--330.
    I discuss Julian Barbour's Machian theories of dynamics, and his proposal that a Machian perspective enables one to solve the problem of time in quantum geometrodynamics (by saying that there is no time!). I concentrate on his recent book, The End of Time (1999). A shortened version will appear in The British Journal for Philosophy of Science}.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  28.  57
    J. Butterfield (2006). The Rotating Discs Argument Defeated. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (1):1-45.
    The rotating discs argument against perdurantism has been mostly discussed by metaphysicians, though the argument of course appeals to ideas from classical mechanics, especially about rotation. In contrast, I assess the RDA from the perspective of the philosophy of physics. I argue for three main conclusions. The first conclusion is that the RDA can be formulated more strongly than is usually recognized: it is not necessary to ‘imagine away’ the dynamical effects of rotation. The second is that in general relativity, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  29.  29
    J. Butterfield (1996). Whither the Minds? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):200-221.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  30.  70
    Jeremy Butterfield (ed.) (1999). The Arguments of Time. Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press.
    These nine essays address fundamental questions about time in philosophy, physics, linguistics, and psychology. Are there facts about the future? Could we affect the past? In physics, general relativity and quantum theory give contradictory treatments of time. So in the current search for a theory of quantum gravity, which should give way: general relativity or quantum theory? In linguistics and psychology, how does our language represent time, and how do our minds keep track of it?
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  31.  81
    Jeremy Butterfield, On Symmetry and Conserved Quantities in Classical Mechanics.
    This paper expounds the relations between continuous symmetries and conserved quantities, i.e. Noether's ``first theorem'', in both the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian frameworks for classical mechanics. This illustrates one of mechanics' grand themes: exploiting a symmetry so as to reduce the number of variables needed to treat a problem. I emphasise that, for both frameworks, the theorem is underpinned by the idea of cyclic coordinates; and that the Hamiltonian theorem is more powerful. The Lagrangian theorem's main ``ingredient'', apart from cyclic coordinates, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32.  16
    Jeremy Butterfield, On Time Chez Dummett.
    I discuss three connections between Dummett's writings about time and philosophical aspects of physics. The first connection arises from remarks of Dummett's about the different relations of observation to time and to space. The main point is uncontroversial and applies equally to classical and quantum physics. It concerns the fact that perceptual processing is so rapid, compared with the typical time-scale on which macroscopic objects change their observable properties, that it engenders the idea of a `common now', spread across space. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  11
    J. Butterfield & H. Halvorson (2003). Robert K. Clifton 1964–2002. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 34 (1):1-3.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  3
    Jeremy Butterfield, Laws, Causation and Dynamics at Different Levels.
    I have two main aims. The first is general, and more philosophical. The second is specific, and more closely related to physics. The first aim is to state my general views about laws and causation at different ` levels '. The main task is to understand how the higher levels sustain notions of law and causation that `ride free' of reductions to the lower level or levels. I endeavour to relate my views to those of other symposiasts. The second aim (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  80
    J. Butterfield (2006). Against Pointillisme About Geometry. In Michael Stöltzner & Friedrich Stadler (eds.), Time and History: Proceedings of the 28. International Ludwig Wittgenstein Symposium, Kirchberg Am Wechsel, Austria 2005. De Gruyter 181-222.
    This paper forms part of a wider campaign: to deny pointillisme. That is the doctrine that a physical theory's fundamental quantities are defined at points of space or of spacetime, and represent intrinsic properties of such points or point-sized objects located there; so that properties of spatial or spatiotemporal regions and their material contents are determined by the point-by-point facts. More specifically, this paper argues against pointillisme about the structure of space and-or spacetime itself, especially a paper by Bricker (1993). (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36.  31
    C. J. Isham & J. Butterfield (2000). Some Possible Roles for Topos Theory in Quantum Theory and Quantum Gravity. Foundations of Physics 30 (10):1707-1735.
    We discuss some ways in which topos theory (a branch of category theory) can be applied to interpretative problems in quantum theory and quantum gravity. In Sec.1, we introduce these problems. In Sec.2, we introduce topos theory, especially the idea of a topos of presheaves. In Sec.3, we discuss several possible applications of topos theory to the problems in Sec.1. In Sec.4, we draw some conclusions.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  37. Robert K. Clifton, Jeremy N. Butterfield & Michael L. G. Redhead (1990). Nonlocal Influences and Possible Worlds--A Stapp in the Wrong Direction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (1):5-58.
    give a proof of the existence of nonlocal influences acting on correlated spin-1/2 particles in the singlet state which does not require any particular interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM). (Except Stapp holds that the proof fails under a many-worlds interpretation of QM—a claim we analyse in 1.2.) Recently, in responding to Redhead's ([1987], pp. 90-6) criticism that the Stapp 1 proof fails under an indeterministic interpretation of QM, Stapp [1989] (henceforth Stapp 2), has revised the logical structure of his proof (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  38.  82
    J. Butterfield (1984). Seeing the Present. Mind 93 (370):161-176.
  39.  67
    Jeremy Butterfield, On Symplectic Reduction in Classical Mechanics.
    This paper expounds the modern theory of symplectic reduction in finite-dimensional Hamiltonian mechanics. This theory generalizes the well-known connection between continuous symmetries and conserved quantities, i.e. Noether's theorem. It also illustrates one of mechanics' grand themes: exploiting a symmetry so as to reduce the number of variables needed to treat a problem. The exposition emphasises how the theory provides insights about the rotation group and the rigid body. The theory's device of quotienting a state space also casts light on philosophical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  40.  61
    Chris Isham & Jeremy Butterfield, A Topos Perspective on the Kochen-Specker Theorem: I. Quantum States as Generalised Valuations.
    Any attempt to construct a realist interpretation of quantum theory founders on the Kochen-Specker theorem, which asserts the impossibility of assigning values to quantum quantities in a way that preserves functional relations between them. We construct a new type of valuation which is defined on all operators, and which respects an appropriate version of the functional composition principle. The truth-values assigned to propositions are (i) contextual; and (ii) multi-valued, where the space of contexts and the multi-valued logic for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  41.  48
    Robert K. Clifton, Michael L. G. Redhead & Jeremy N. Butterfield (1991). Generalization of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger Algebraic Proof of Nonlocality. Foundations of Physics 21 (2):149-184.
    We further develop a recent new proof (by Greenberger, Horne, and Zeilinger—GHZ) that local deterministic hidden-variable theories are inconsistent with certain strict correlations predicted by quantum mechanics. First, we generalize GHZ's proof so that it applies to factorable stochastic theories, theories in which apparatus hidden variables are causally relevant to measurement results, and theories in which the hidden variables evolve indeterministically prior to the particle-apparatus interactions. Then we adopt a more general measure-theoretic approach which requires that GHZ's argument be modified (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42. J. Butterfield (1985). Spatial and Temporal Parts. Philosophical Quarterly 35 (138):32-44.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  43.  14
    Gordon Fleming & Jeremy Butterfield (1999). Strange Positions. In Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.), From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 108--165.
    The current status of localization and related concepts, especially localized statevectors and position operators, within Lorentz-invariant Quantum Theory (LIQT) is ambiguous and controversial.1 Ever since the early work of Newton & Wigner (1949), and the subsequent extensions of their work, particularly by Hegerfeldt (1974, 1985), it has seemed impossible to identify localized statevectors or position operators in LIQT that were not counterintuitive—strange—in one way or another; the most striking strange property being the superluminal propagation of the localized states. The ambiguous (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  44.  78
    Jeremy Butterfield, Against Pointillisme: A Call to Arms.
    This paper forms part of a wider campaign: to deny pointillisme. That is the doctrine that a physical theory's fundamental quantities are defined at points of space or of spacetime, and represent intrinsic properties of such points or point-sized objects located there; so that properties of spatial or spatiotemporal regions and their material contents are determined by the point-by-point facts. Elsewhere, I argued against pointillisme about chrono-geometry, and about velocity in classical mechanics. In both cases, attention focussed on temporal extrinsicality: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  70
    Jeremy Butterfield (2006). The Rotating Discs Argument Defeated. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (1):1-45.
  46.  53
    G. C. Ghirardi, R. Grassi, J. Butterfield & G. N. Fleming (1993). Parameter Dependence and Outcome Dependence in Dynamical Models for State Vector Reduction. Foundations of Physics 23 (3):341-364.
    We apply the distinction between parameter independence and outcome independence to the linear and nonlinear models of a recent nonrelativistic theory of continuous state vector reduction. We show that in the nonlinear model there is a set of realizations of the stochastic process that drives the state vector reduction for which parameter independence is violated for parallel spin components in the EPR-Bohm setup. Such a set has an appreciable probability of occurrence (≈ 1/2). On the other hand, the linear model (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47. Jeremy Butterfield & John Earman (2007). Handbook of Philosophy of Science. In Jeremy Butterfield & John Earman (eds.), Philosophy of Physics. Elsevier
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  85
    Jeremy Butterfield (1998). Seeing the Present. In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press 161-176.
  49. Jeremy Butterfield (1998). Quantum Curiosities of Psychophysics. In J. Cornwell (ed.), Consciousness and Human Identity. Oxford University Press
    I survey some of the connections between the metaphysics of the relation between mind and matter, and quantum theory’s measurement problem. After discussing the metaphysics, especially the correct formulation of physicalism, I argue that two state-reduction approaches to quantum theory’s measurement problem hold some surprises for philosophers’ discussions of physicalism. Though both approaches are compatible with physicalism, they involve a very different conception of the physical, and of how the physical underpins the mental, from what most philosophers expect. And one (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  61
    Jeremy Butterfield (2005). On the Persistence of Particles. Foundations of Physics 35 (2):233-269.
    This paper is about the metaphysical debate whether objects persist over time by the selfsame object existing at different times (nowadays called “endurance” by metaphysicians), or by different temporal parts, or stages, existing at different times (called “perdurance”). I aim to illuminate the debate by using some elementary kinematics and real analysis: resources which metaphysicians have, surprisingly, not availed themselves of. There are two main results, which are of interest to both endurantists and perdurantists. (1) I describe a precise formal (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 126