Search results for 'J. C. Ny' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. C. Ny (1974). Beim Sternenlicht der Nichtexistierenden. Inquiry 17 (1-4):399 – 443.score: 290.0
    Der Aufsatz schildert den platonisierenden Antipsychologismus welchen Bolzano, der junge Brentano, Twardowski, Meinong, der Husserl der Logischen Untersuchungen, Frege, der Russell der Jahrhundertwende und der junge Wittgenstein (...)
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  2. John Marenbon (1998). C. F. J. Martin, An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1996. Paper. Pp. Vii, 148. $25. Distributed by Columbia University Press, 562 W. 113th St., New York, NY 10027. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (3):868-869.score: 81.0
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  3. Shannon McSheffrey (1998). Helen M. Jewell, Women in Medieval England. Manchester, Eng., and New York: Manchester University Press, 1996. Paper. Pp. Vii, 201. $19.95. Distributed in North America by St. Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10010.P. J. P. Goldberg, Trans., Women in England, C. 12751525: Documentary Sources. (Manchester Medieval Sources Series.) Manchester, Eng., and New York: Manchester University Press, 1995. Pp. X, 307. Distributed in North America by St. Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10010. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (1):194-196.score: 81.0
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  4. S. L. Molony (2008). Book Review: Baars J, Dannefer D, Phillipson C, Walker A Eds. 2006: Aging, Globalization and Inequality: the New Gerontology. Amityville, NY: Baywood Publishing. 300 Pp. USD60.00 (HB). ISBN: 0 89503 358 5. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 15 (5):703-704.score: 81.0
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  5. Sheila L. Molony (2008). Book Review: Baars J, Dannefer D, Phillipson C, Walker A Eds. 2006: Aging, Globalization and Inequality: the New Gerontology. Amityville, NY: Baywood Publishing. 300 Pp. USD60. 00 (HB). ISBN: 0 89503 358 5. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 15 (5):703-704.score: 81.0
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  6. A. J. Podlecki (2005). Themistocles' Exile A. Keaveney: The Life and Journey of Athenian Statesman Themistocles (524460 B.C.?) as a Refugee in Persia . (Studies in Classics 23.) Pp. X + 179. Lewiston, NY, Queenston, and Lampeter: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2003. Cased. ISBN: 0-7734-6809-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):580-.score: 39.0
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  7. J. A. Richmond (1993). Peter K. Knoefel, Madeline C. Covi: A Hellenistic Treatise on Poisonous Animals (the 'Theriaca' of Nicander of Colophon). A Contribution to the History of Toxicology. Pp. Xiv + 173; 28 Figs, 19 Plates. Lewiston, NY; Queenston, Ontario; Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press, 1991. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (01):166-167.score: 39.0
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  8. Rágena C. DeAragon (2008). Louise J. Wilkinson, Women in Thirteenth-Century Lincolnshire.(Studies in History, Ns) Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, for the Royal Historical Society, 2007. Pp. Xvi, 245; 6 Black-and-White Figures, Tables, and 3 Maps. $85. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (4):1056-1058.score: 39.0
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  9. C. Kaplan (2010). Film Review: Grainger-Monsen M, Haslett J, Hold Your Breath, Fanlight Productions: Brooklyn, NY, 2005, 1572958502, 58 Minutes: USD289 Purchase; or USD60 One Day Rental (DVD), Http://Fanlight.Com/Home.Php. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 17 (6):797-798.score: 39.0
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  10. Cynthia J. Neville (2001). Christine Carpenter, Ed., The Armburgh Papers: The Brokholes Inheritance in Warwickshire, Hertfordshire and Essex, C. 1417C. 1453. Chetham's Manuscript Mun. E. 6.10.(4). Woodbridge, Suff., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 1998. Pp. Viii, 214; 1 Table and 1 Diagram. $63. [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (1):142-144.score: 39.0
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  11. Pierre J. Payer (1996). Mary C. Mansfield, The Humiliation of Sinners: Public Penance in Thirteenth-Century France. Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 1995. Pp. Xv, 343; 5 Black-and-White Plates, 1 Diagram. $39.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):459-461.score: 39.0
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  12. J. Beverley Smith (2004). Robert B. Patterson, The Scriptorium of Margam Abbey and the Scribes of Early Angevin Glamorgan: Secretarial Administration in a Welsh Marcher Barony, C. 1150C. 1225. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 2002. Pp. Xxxvi, 147 Plus 32 Black-and-White Plates; Black-and-White Frontispiece. $110. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (3):821-823.score: 39.0
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  13. Robert C. Stacey (2006). P. J. P. Goldberg, Medieval England: A Social History, 12501550. London: Arnold, 2004. Pp. Ix, 310; Tables and 1 Map. Distributed in the U.S. by Oxford University Press Inc., 198 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10016. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (3):855-856.score: 39.0
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  14. Siam J. Comput, Randomness and Recursive Enumerability.score: 30.0
    One recursively enumerable real α dominates another one β if there are nondecreasing recursive sequences of rational numbers (a[n] : nω) approximating α and (b[n] (...)
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  15. J. C. Ny�ri (1994). Preface. Studies in East European Thought 46 (1-2):1-8.score: 29.0
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  16. Stephen Finlay & Terence Cuneo (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide for: Moral Realism and Moral Nonnaturalism. Philosophy Compass 3 (3):570-572.score: 27.0
    Metaethics is a perennially popular subject, but one that can be challenging to study and teach. As it consists in an array of questions about ethics, it (...)
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  17. Branden Fitelson (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide for: The Paradox of Confirmation. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1103-1105.score: 27.0
    The early twentieth century witnessed a shift in the way philosophers of science thought about traditional 'problems of induction'. Keynes championed the idea that Hume's Problem (...)was not a problem about causation (which had been the traditional reading of Hume) but rather a problem about induction. Moreover, Keynes (and later Nicod) viewed such problems as having both logical and epistemological components. Hempel picked up where Keynes and Nicod left off, by formulating a rigorous formal theory of inductive logic. This spawned a new branch of philosophy of science called confirmation theory. Hempel's theory of confirmation was based on a few very simple (and seemingly plausible) assumptions about (instantial) 'inductive-logical support'. However, as Hempel himself was keenly aware, even such simple and seemingly plausible assumptions give rise to various puzzles and paradoxes. The two most famous paradoxes of confirmation were discovered by Hempel and Goodman. This article discusses Hempel's paradox (which is known as 'the' paradox of confirmation, since it was discovered first). However, many of the historical developments surrounding Hempel's paradox (also known as the 'raven paradox') are also crucial for understanding Goodman's later ('grue') paradox. Author Recommends: Branden Fitelson, 'The Paradox of Confirmation', Philosophy Compass 1/1 (2006): 95113, doi: [DOI link]. In this article, I explain how the inconsistency between Hempel's intuitive resolution and his official theory of confirmation affects the historical dialectic about the paradox and how it illuminates the nature of confirmation. After the survey, I argue that Hempel's intuitions about the paradox of confirmation were basically correct, and that it is his theory that should be rejected, in favor of a (broadly) Bayesian account of confirmation. C. G. Hempel, 'Studies in the Logic of Confirmation' (I and II), Mind 54 (1945): 126, 97121, dois: [DOI link]; [DOI link]. This is the locus classicus of traditional (instantial) confirmation theory. It is here that original motivations for, traditional approaches to, and paradoxes of confirmation are discussed in depth for the first time, under the rubric 'confirmation theory'. Hempel's discussion (which picks up where Keynes and Nicod left off) is chock full of crucial historical, logical, and epistemological insights. J. M. Keynes, A Treatise on Probability (London: Macmillan, 1921). Keynes does not get enough credit in this context. But, basically, chapters 18 to 23 of this classic book planted the seeds for almost all of modern confirmation theory. Nicod and Hempel (as well as Hosiasson-Lindenbaum, Carnap, and others) were, basically, just picking-up where Keynes left off. J. Nicod, The Logical Problem of Induction (1923), reprinted in Foundations of Geometry and Induction (London: Routledge, 2000). Nicod's essay expands upon Keynes's work. Nicod is the first to use the term 'confirmation', in connection with a relation of 'inductive-logical support'. Nicod endorses several key confirmation-theoretic principles (which were already advanced by Keynes). In the hands of Hempel, Nicod's work later becomes an important historical foil. J. HosiassonLindenbaum, 'On Confirmation', Journal of Symbolic Logic 5 (1940): 13348. This essay contains most (if not all) of the basic ingredients of the 'Bayesian' approaches to the paradox of confirmation that appeared later. It also sheds much light on an important dispute between Keynes and Nicod concerning one of the claims Keynes makes (in his Treatise) about 'long-run convergence' in certain (instantial) confirmation-theoretic problems. This paper also contains one of the earliest rigorous axiomatizations of conditional (subjective or logical) probability. R. Carnap, Logical Foundations of Probability (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, 1950). This is Carnap's encyclopaedic work on inductive logic and probability. There is a tremendous amount of wisdom in here. For present purposes, the sections on Hempel's theory of confirmation (in contrast to probabilistic approaches to confirmation, such as HosiassonLindenbaum's and Carnap's) are probably most important and salient (see §§878). I. J. Good, 'The Paradox of Confirmation', British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 11 (1960): 1459. C. Chihara, 'Quine and the Confirmational Paradoxes', in Midwest Studies in Philosophy. Vol. 6: The Foundations of Analytic Philosophy, eds. Peter A. French, Theodore E. Uehling, Jr., and Howard K. Wettstein (Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1981), 42552. J. Earman, Bayes or Bust: A Critical Examination of Bayesian Confirmation Theory (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1992), specifically: pp. 6373. R. M. Royall, Statistical Evidence: A Likelihood Paradigm (New York, NY: Chapman & Hall, 1997), specifically: the Appendix on 'The Paradox of the Ravens'. C. McKenzie and L. Mikkelsen, 'The Psychological Side of Hempel's Paradox of Confirmation', Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 7 (2000): 3606. P. Maher, 'Probability Captures the Logic of Scientific Confirmation', in Contemporary Debates in the Philosophy of Science, ed. Christopher <span class='Hi'>Hitchcockspan> (Oxford: Blackwell, 2004), 6993. P. Vranas, 'Hempel's Raven Paradox: A Lacuna in the Standard Bayesian Solution', British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (2004): 54560. This is a list of seven of my favourite papers on the paradox of confirmation, since 1950 (listed in chronological order). Most of these are coming from a broadly 'Bayesian' perspective. In particular, I recommend Vranas as a good starting point here. Online Materials: http://fitelson.org/probability/ Probability & Induction (PHIL 148, UC-Berkeley, Spring 2008) This is the Web site for an undergraduate course on probability and induction that I taught at UC-Berkeley in Spring 2008. Much of the course focuses on confirmation theory (including the paradoxes of confirmation). There are many links there to lecture notes, papers, books and other salient online resources. http://fitelson.org/confirmation/ Confirmation (graduate seminar, UC-Berkeley, Fall 2007) This is the Web site for a graduate seminar on confirmation that I taught at UC-Berkeley in Fall 2007. This seminar is a historical trace of induction/confirmation, from Aristotle to Goodman (mostly, focusing on the 20th century and the paradoxes of confirmation). Sample Syllabus: See the online syllabi for Confirmation and/or Probability & Induction (above). Note: those online syllabi contain electronic copies of many of the salient readings. (shrink)
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  18. Sanford Shieh (2009). Teaching & Learning Guide for: Frege on Definitions. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):885-888.score: 27.0
    Three clusters of philosophically significant issues arise from Frege's discussions of definitions. First, Frege criticizes the definitions of mathematicians of his day, especially those of Weierstrass (...)and Hilbert. Second, central to Frege's philosophical discussion and technical execution of logicism is the so-called Hume's Principle, considered in The Foundations of Arithmetic . Some varieties of neo-Fregean logicism are based on taking this principle as a contextual definition of the operator 'the number of …', and criticisms of such neo-Fregean programs sometimes appeal to Frege's objections to contextual definitions in later writings. Finally, a critical question about the definitions on which Frege's proofs of the laws of arithmetic depend is whether the logical structures of the definientia reflect our pre-Fregean understanding of arithmetical terms. It seems that unless they do, it is unclear how Frege's proofs demonstrate the analyticity of the arithmetic in use before logicism. Yet, especially in late writings, Frege characterizes the definitions as arbitrary stipulations of the senses or references of expressions unrelated to pre-definitional understanding. One or more of these topics may be studied in a survey course in the philosophy of mathematics or a course on Frege's philosophy. The latter two topics are obviously central in a seminar in the philosophy of mathematics in general or more specialized seminars on logicism, or on mathematical definitions and concept formation. Author Recommends: 1. Kant, Immanuel. Critique of Pure Reason . Trans. P. Guyer and A. Wood. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999 [1781, 1787], A7-10/B11-14, A151/B190. In the first Critique , Kant appears to give four distinct accounts of analytic judgments. The initial famous account explains analyticity in terms of the predicate-concept belonging to the subject-concept (A67/B11). In this passage, we also find an account of establishing analytic judgments on the basis of conceptual containments and the principle of non-contradiction. (The other accounts are in terms of 'identity' (A7/B1l), in terms of the explicativeampliative contrast (A7/B11), and by reference to the notion of 'cognizability in accordance with the principle of contradiction' (A151/B190).) 2. Frege, Gottlob. The Foundations of Arithmetic . Trans. J. L. Austin. 2nd ed. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1980 [1884], especially sections 14, 8791. Frege here criticizes and reformulates Kant's account of analyticity. Central to Frege's account is the provability of an analytic statement on the basis of (Frege's) logic and definitions that express analyses of (mathematical, especially arithmetical) concepts. 3. Frege, Gottlob. Review of E. G. Husserl. 'Philosophie der Arithmetik I [1894],' in Frege, Collected Papers . Ed. B. McGuinness. Trans. M. Black et al. Oxford: Blackwell, 1984. 195209. In this review, Frege responds to Husserl's charge that Frege's definitions fail to capture our intuitive pre-analytic arithmetical concepts by claiming that the adequacy of mathematical definitions is measured, not by their expressing the same senses, but merely by their having the same references, as pre-definitional vocabulary. It follows not only that Husserl's criticism is unfounded, but also that there can be alternative, equally legitimate, definitions of mathematical terms. 4. Frege, 'Logic in Mathematics,' in Frege, Posthumous Writings . Trans. P. Long and R. White. Oxford: Blackwell, 1979 [1914]. 20350. These are a set of lecture notes including, among other things, an account of proper definitions as mere abbreviation of complex signs by simple ones, in contrast to definitions which purport to express the analyses of existing concepts. Frege here claims that if there is any doubt whether a definition purporting to express an analysis succeeds in capturing the senses of the pre-definitional expressions, then the definition fails as an analysis, and should be regarded as the introduction of an entirely new expression abbreviating the definiens . 5. Picardi, Eva. 'Frege on Definition and Logical Proof,' Temi e Prospettive della Logica e della Filosofia della Scienza Contemporanee . i vol. Eds. C. Cellucci and G. Sambin. Bologna: Cooperativa Libraria Universitaria Editrice Bologna, 1988. 22730. Picardi sets out forcefully the view that unless Frege's definitions capture the meanings of existing arithmetical terms, his logicism cannot have the epistemological significance he takes it to have. 6. Dummett, Michael. 'Frege and the Paradox of Analysis,' in Dummett, Frege and other Philosophers . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. 1752. Dummett agrees with Picardi's view and analyzes the philosophical pressures that led Frege to the account of definition in 'Logic in Mathematics.' Especially significant is Dummett's claim of the centrality of the transparency of sensethat if one grasps the senses of any two expressions, one must know whether they have the same sensein Frege's account. 7. Benacerraf, Paul. 'Frege: The Last Logicist,' Midwest Studies in Philosophy . vol. 6. Eds. P. French, T. Uehling, and H. Wettstein. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1981. 1735. Frege's aims, on Benacerraf's reading, are primarily mathematical. Frege was interested in traditional philosophical issues such as the analyticity of arithmetic only to the extent that they can be exploited for the mathematical goal of proving previously unproven arithmetical statements. Hence, Frege never had any serious interest in or need for showing that his definitions of arithmetical terms reflect existing arithmetical conceptions. 8. Weiner, Joan. 'The Philosopher Behind the Last Logicist,' in Frege: Tradition and Influence . Ed. C. Wright. Oxford: Blackwell, 1984. 5779. Weiner argues that on Frege's view, prior to his definitions of arithmetical terms the references of such expressions are in fact not known by those who use arithmetical vocabulary. Thus, in Foundations , Frege operated with a 'hidden agenda' (263) namely, replacing existing arithmetic with a new science based on stipulative definitions that assign new senses to key arithmetical terms. 9. Tappenden, Jamie. 'Extending Knowledge and 'Fruitful Concepts': Fregean Themes in the Foundations of Mathematics.' Noûs 29 (1995): 42767. Tappenden argues that Frege takes his crucial innovation over previous practices and accounts of mathematical concept formation to be the role of quantificational structure made possible by his logical discoveries. 10. Horty, John. Frege on Definitions: A Case Study of Semantic Content . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. A useful interpretation of Frege's views of definition, together with suggestive extensions for resolving the issues framing Frege's views. 11. Shieh, Sanford. 'Frege on Definitions,' Philosophy Compass 3/5 (2008): 9921012. A more detailed account of Frege's views on definition and the philosophical issues they raise, surveying and discussing critically the main substantive and interpretive issues. Online Materials On Frege http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/frege/ On the Paradox of Analysis http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/analysis/ Sample Syllabus The following is a 3-week module that can be incorporated into fairly focused historically oriented graduate-level seminars on logicism or on the paradox of analysis. It is also possible to compress the material into 2 weeks in an undergraduate or graduate class Frege's thought in general. Week I: Background, Kant on Analyticity; Definition in Foundations , Review of Husserl, and 'Logic in Mathematics' Readings Kant, Immanuel. Critique of Pure Reason , A710/B1114. Frege, Gottlob. The Foundations of Arithmetic , sections 14, 8791. Frege, Gottlob. Review of E. G. Husserl, Philosophie der Arithmetik I. Frege, Gottlob. 'Logic in Mathematics.' Optional Proops, Ian. 'Kant's Conception of Analytic Judgment,' Philosophy and Phenomenological Research LXX, 3 (2005): 588612. Week II: The Supposed Paradox of Analysis, Picardi and Dummett; Bypassing Traditional Epistemological Issues About Mathematics, Benacerraf Readings Picardi, Eva. 'Frege on Definition and Logical Proof.' Dummett, Michael. 'Frege and the Paradox of Analysis.' Benacerraf, Paul. 'Frege: The Last Logicist.' Optional Tappenden, Jamie. 'Extending Knowledge and 'Fruitful Concepts': Fregean Themes in the Foundations of Mathematics.' Week III: Weiner's Hidden Agenda Interpretation Readings Weiner, Joan. 'The Philosopher Behind the Last Logicist.' Optional Weiner, Joan. Frege in Perspective . Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1990. Focus Questions 1. To what extent is Frege's account of analyticity in Foundations a rejection, and to what extent an updating, of Kant's view of analyticity? 2. According to Picardi it 'would be incomprehensible' how Frege's proofs tells us anything about the arithmetic we already have unless his 'definitions [are] somehow responsible to the meaning of [arithmetical] sentences as these are understood' (228). Why does she hold this? Why does Dummett agree with her? Do you think Frege's logicism needs to address this worry? 3. What are the major differences and continuities in Frege's discussions of definition in mathematics in Foundations , the review of Husserl and 'Logic in Mathematics'? 4. Frege writes that definitions must prove their worth by being fruitful. He also says that nothing can be proven using a proper definition that cannot be proven without it. Are these claims consistent? Why or why not? 5. Weiner held that in Foundations Frege had 'hidden agenda.' What, according to her, is this agenda? How does this fit with Frege's later views of definition? 6. What are Frege's main complaints about Weierstrass's definitions in 'Logic in Mathematics'? Are these criticisms consistent with Frege's account of 'definition proper' in the same text? Seminar/Project Ideas What, if anything, is the relation between Frege's critique of Hilbert's use of definitions and Frege's later views of definitions? (shrink)
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  19. Sherri Irvin (2009). Teaching and Learning Guide for: Authors, Intentions and Literary Meaning. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):287-291.score: 27.0
    The relationship of the author's intention to the meaning of a literary work has been a persistently controversial topic in aesthetics. Anti-intentionalists Wimsatt and Beardsley, in (...) the 1946 paper that launched the debate, accused critics who fueled their interpretative activity by poring over the author's private diaries and life story of committing the 'fallacy' of equating the work's meaning, properly determined by context and linguistic convention, with the meaning intended by the author. Hirsch responded that context and convention are not sufficient to determine a unique meaning for a text; to avoid radical ambiguity we must appeal to the author's intention, which actualizes one of the candidate meanings. Subsequent writers have defended refined versions of these views, and a variety of positions on the spectrum between them, in a debate that remains central to philosophical aesthetics. While much of the debate has focused on literature, similar questions arise with respect to the interpretation of visual artworks. Some of the readings listed below address this matter explicitly. Author Recommends: William K. Wimsatt and Monroe C. Beardsley, 'The Intentional Fallacy', Sewanee Review 54 (1946): 46888. Locus classicus of the anti-intentionalist position: Wimsatt and Beardsley hold that appeal to the author's intention is always extraneous, since intention cannot override the role of linguistic convention and context in determining meaning. Criticism, they argue, should thus proceed by careful examination of the literary work rather than by sifting through biographical material that might hint at the author's intentions. E. D. Hirsch, Jr., Validity in Interpretation (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1967). The seminal statement of actual intentionalism: Hirsch holds that 'meaning is an affair of consciousness and not of physical signs or things' (23), though he allows that linguistic convention constrains the meanings the author can intend for a particular utterance. He argues that the author's intention is necessary to fix meaning, since the application of conventions alone would typically leave a text wildly indeterminate. Alexander Nehamas, 'The Postulated Author: Critical Monism as a Regulative Ideal', Critical Inquiry 8 (1981): 13349. Nehamas argues for a version of hypothetical intentionalism according to which interpretation is a matter of attributing an intended meaning to a hypothetical author, distinct from the historical writer. This view allows the interpreter to find meaning even in features of the work that may have been mere accidents on the part of the historical writer. Gary Iseminger, ed., Intention and Interpretation (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1992). Intention and Interpretation is an outstanding collection including both classic and new essays representing most of the major viewpoints in the debate. Noël Carroll, 'Art, Intention, and Conversation', Intention and Interpretation , ed. Gary Iseminger (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1992), 97131. The essay defends modest actual intentionalism, according to which the work's meaning is one compatible both with the author's meaning intentions and with the conventionally allowable meanings of the text. Carroll holds that literature is on a continuum with ordinary conversation, to which an intentionalist analysis is apt; for this reason he rejects anti-intentionalism and hypothetical intentionalism, which emphasize the purported autonomy of literary works from their authors. Daniel Nathan, 'Irony, Metaphor, and the Problem of Intention', Intention and Interpretation , ed. Gary Iseminger (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1992), 183202. Nathan argues that even irony and metaphor, which are often thought to require an analysis in terms of the author's actual intentions, are in fact best understood on an anti-intentionalist approach. Jerrold Levinson, 'Intention and Interpretation in Literature', The Pleasures of Aesthetics: Philosophical Essays (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1996), 175213. Revised version of 'Intention and Interpretation: A Last Look', Intention and Interpretation , ed. Gary Iseminger (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1992), 22156. The essay defends a version of hypothetical intentionalism according to which the meaning of a literary work is the meaning that would be attributed to the actual author by members of the ideal audience. Levinson argues that literary works should be treated differently from everyday utterances, since it is a convention of literature that its works are substantially autonomous from their authors. Paisley Livingston, Art and Intention: A Philosophical Study (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005). Livingston examines competing accounts of the nature of intentions as they pertain to a variety of issues in the philosophy of art, including the ontology of art, the nature of authorship, and art interpretation. In chapter 6, Livingston argues for partial intentionalism, according to which some, but not all, of a work's meanings are non-redundantly determined by the author's intentions. Stephen Davies, 'Authors' Intentions, Literary Interpretation, and Literary Value', British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2006): 22347. Davies defends the value-maximizing view, according to which, when there is more than one conventional meaning consistent with the work's features, the meaning that should be attributed to the work is the one that makes the work out to be most aesthetically valuable. He allows for the attribution of multiple meanings when more than one candidate (approximately) maximizes the work's value. Online Materials: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/beardsley-aesthetics/ Beardsley's Aesthetics (Michael Wreen) http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/conceptual-art/ Conceptual Art (Elisabeth Schellekens) http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/speech-acts/ Speech Acts (Mitchell Green) http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/hermeneutics/ Hermeneutics (Bjørn Ramberg and Kristin Gjesdal) Sample Syllabus: Week 1: Foundations 1. Wimsatt and Beardsley, 'The Intentional Fallacy'. 2. Livingston, 'What Are Intentions?', Art and Intention , 130. Weeks 23: Actual Intentionalism 1. Hirsch, Validity in Interpretation , ch. 12, 167. 2. Gary Iseminger, 'An Intentional Demonstration?', Intention and Interpretation , ed. Iseminger, 7696. Optional reading: 1. Stephen Knapp and Walter Benn Michaels, 'Against Theory', Critical Inquiry 8 (1982): 723742. 2. Stephen Knapp and Walter Benn Michaels, 'Against Theory 2: Hermeneutics and Deconstruction', Critical Inquiry 14 (1987): 4958. Weeks 45: Modest, Moderate and Partial Intentionalism 1. Carroll, 'Art, Intention, and Conversation'. 2. Robert Stecker, Interpretation and Construction: Art, Speech, and the Law (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2003), ch. 2, 2951. 3. Livingston, 'Intention and the Interpretation of Art', Art and Intention , 13574. Optional reading: 1. Carroll, 'Interpretation and Intention: The Debate between Hypothetical and Actual Intentionalism', Metaphilosophy 31 (2000): 7595. 2. Stecker, 'Moderate Actual Intentionalism Defended', Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (2006): 42938. Weeks 67: Hypothetical Intentionalism 1. William E. Tolhurst, 'On What a Text Is and How It Means', British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (1979): 314. 2. Nehamas, 'Postulated Author'. 3. Levinson, 'Intention and Interpretation in Literature'. Optional reading: 1. Nehamas, 'What an Author Is', Journal of Philosophy 83 (1986): 68591. 2. Nehamas, 'Writer, Text, Work, Author', Literature and the Question of Philosophy , ed. A. J. Cascardi (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987), 26591. 3. Levinson, 'Hypothetical Intentionalism: Statement, Objections, and Replies', Is There a Single Right Interpretation? , ed. M. Krausz (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002), 30918. Week 8: The Value-Maximizing View 1. Davies, 'The Aesthetic Relevance of Authors' and Painters' Intentions', Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (1982): 6576. 2. Davies, 'Authors' Intentions, Literary Interpretation, and Literary Value'. Weeks 910: Anti-Intentionalism 1. Beardsley, 'The Authority of the Text,' The Possibility of Criticism (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1970), 1637. 2. Nathan, 'Irony, Metaphor, and the Problem of Intention'. 3. Nathan, 'Art, Meaning, and Artist's Meaning', Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art , ed. M. Kieran (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2006), 28295. Optional reading: 1. Beardsley, 'Intentions and Interpretations: A Fallacy Revived', The Aesthetic Point of View: Selected Essays , ed. M. J. Wreen and D. M. Callen (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1982), 188207. 2. Nathan, 'Irony and the Author's Intentions', British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (1982): 24656. Sample Mini-Syllabus: Week 1: Foundations 1. Wimsatt and Beardsley, 'The Intentional Fallacy'. 2. Livingston, 'What Are Intentions?', Art and Intention , 130. Week 2: Actual and Modest Intentionalism 1. Hirsch, Validity in Interpretation , ch. 12, 167. 2. Carroll, 'Art, Intention, and Conversation'. Week 3: Hypothetical Intentionalism and Anti-Intentionalism 1. Levinson, 'Intention and Interpretation in Literature'. 2. Nathan, 'Irony, Metaphor, and the Problem of Intention'. Focus Questions 1. Is the difficulty of ascertaining the author's intentions a good reason to reject actual intentionalism? 2. Should literary works be seen as largely autonomous from their authors, even if we think that interpretation of ordinary utterances is properly a matter of ascertaining the speaker's intentions? 3. Are linguistic context and convention sufficient to determine the meaning of a literary work, or is the author's intention required to stave off an unacceptable degree of ambiguity? 4. Should the author's intentions about the genre or category to which the work belongs have a different status than intentions about the work's meaning? 5. Can the author's intentions have a non-redundant role to play in fixing meaning even if we take the role of context and linguistic convention seriously? 6. Should we expect the author's intention to play the same role (if any) in the interpretation of visual artworks that it plays in the interpretation of literature, or do differences between these two art forms require distinct approaches? (shrink)
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  20. Philip Stratton–Lake (2003). Scanlon's Contractualism and the Redundancy Objection. Analysis 63 (277):70–76.score: 27.0
    Ebbhinghaus, H., J. Flum, and W. Thomas. 1984. Mathematical Logic. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag. Forster, T. Typescript. The significance of Yablos paradox without self-reference. Available (...)
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  21. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 27.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial (...)Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCECRUISING IN THE RUINS: THE QUESTION OF DISCIPLINARITY IN THE POST/MEDIEVAL UNIVERSITYSEPTEMBER 21ST, 2012: SESSION 13 MCLEOD C.322, CURRY STUDENT CENTER NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY, BOSTON, MA. Traditionally, a wayzgoose was a celebration at the end of a printers year, a night off in the late fall before the work began of printing by candlelight. According to the OED, the Master Printer would make for the journeymena good Feast, and not only entertains them at his own House, but besides, gives them Money to spend at the Ale-house or Tavern at Night.” Following in this line, continent. proposes in its publication(s) a night out and a good Feast, away from the noxious fumes of the Academy and into a night of revelry which begins, but does not end, at the alehouse or Tavern. continent. proposes that the thinking of the Academy be freed to be thought elsewhere, in the alleys and doorways of the village and cities, encountered not in the strictly defined spaces of the classroom and blackboard (now white) but anticipated and found where thinking occurs. Historically, academic journals have served a different purpose than the Academy itself. Journals (from the Anglo-Fr. jurnal , "a day," from O.Fr. jornel , "day, time; day's work," hence the journalist as writer of the news of the day ) have served as privileged sites for the articulation and concretization of specific modes of knowledge and control (insemination of those ideas has been formalized in the classroom, in seminar). In contrast, the academic journal is post-partum and has been an old-boys club, an insider trading network in which truths are (re)circulated against themselves, forming a Maginot Line against whatever is new, or the distinctly challenging. All in a Jurnals Work will discuss (in part) the ramifications of cheap start-up publications that are challenging the traditional ensconced-in-ivory academic journals and their supporting infrastructures. The panel will be seeking a questioning (as a challenging) towards the discipline of knowledge production/fabrication (of truth[s]) and the event of the Academy (and its publications) as it has evolved and continues to (d)evolve. Issues to be discussed will revolve around the power of academic publishing and its origins, hierarchical versus horizontal academic modules (is there a place for the General Assembly in academia?) and the evolving idea of the Multiversity as a site(s) of a (BABELing) multivocality in the wake of the University of Disaster. DISTURBING THE WEDNESDAY-ISH BUSINESS-AS-USUAL OF THE UNIVERSITY STUDIUM: A WAYZGOOSE MANIFEST Eileen A. Joy This time it is not I who seek it out . . . it is the element which rises from the scene, shoots out of it like an arrow, and pierces me. A Latin word exists to designate this wound, this prick, this mark made by a pointed instrument . . . This element which will disturb the studium I . . . call punctum; for punctum is also: sting, speck, cut, little holeand also a cast of the dice. —Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida What enables us to risk change is the feeling that we are understood and (therefore) accompanied. —L.O. Aranye Fradenburg, “Living ChaucerProfessional Challenges. Amateur Solutions. —motto of the Bruce High Quality Foundation In an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education , “Ditch the Monograph,” Jennifer Howard surveys some recent experiments by university presses to cultivate and produce shorter-form e-books (i.e., Princeton Shorts and Stanford Briefs), 1 and wonders if these books might notpull in new readers for serious scholarship,” and at a time, moreover, whenacademic libraries have ever-smaller amounts of money and space to lavish on [longer] books, which often have more pages than they have readers.” 2 Paul Harvey, the new director of Stanford University Press, explains that these books will beaccessible but not simplified, and should be digestible in one or two sessionsbite-sizedand not require a month of reading.” 3 At the same time, we are witnessing the launching of new academic publishing initiatives, such as Anvil Academic, a platform forborn-digitalandborn-again-digital” “post-monograph” (non-book) research that is pinning its hopes for the future of academic publishing on networked anddigital-onlyenvironments that wouldfree scholarly argument from the limitations of the printed monograph and allow authors to bring the full force of technology to the presentation of their work.” 4 It appears important to the academic collective at Anvil to continue to maintain and ensure certain protocols of peer review, but in ways that arebetter suited to network environments.” Conversely, Zer0 Books (an imprint of John Hunt Publishing, Ltd.), one of the more radical and exciting academic imprints out there today, is offering shorter-form books that are very much still books in print as well as available in e-book formats. In their mission statement, Zer0 inveighs (in somewhat hysterical tones) that acretinous anti-intellectualism presidesover a contemporary culture, “cheerled by hacks in the pay of multinational corporations,” and thus the time is ripe for a different set of discourses—“intellectual without being academic, popular without being populist”—and while Zer0 Books, indeed, offers a particularly electric and eclectic list of reasonably-priced, shorter-form books ( Slime Dynamics , Nuclear Futurism , and Levitate the Primate are just a few samples of their bracing titles), they do not offer any of their publications in open-access form. Thus, their desire for a reinvigorated and non-bland, non-consensual sphere of public intellectual debate is still somewhat in the shadow of the multinational corporations (such as Amazon.com, to which all of their book pages link) that their mission statement scorns. 5 While watching the fat of our wayzgoose congeal in the wood-grains of the table in our communal vagabond printers workshop, and while bathed in the autumnal light of the raining Gutenberg-era photons to which Issac Linder has called our attention, 6 I share this admittedly woefully brief and selective overview of current trends in academic publishing initiatives simply to highlight their austerity of (or, perhaps, their overly pragmatic) imagination as well as theirheavymanagerial structures. 7 For even while I applaud the initiative of these initiatives (and I plan to support them with my voice and wallet, being a pluralist, after all), I also despair a little at the ways in which they are each, in their own way, also locked into institutional structures (whether corporate, academic, or even ideological) that determine in advance what is and isnt (supposedly) possible and what is (supposedly) necessary nowsuch that, for example, the monograph is nowoutand shorter books (or serialized e-extracts from longer works) arein,” e-texts are more desirable (and supposedly cheaper to produce and disseminate) than traditional print media, it is necessary to shift (and even dispense with) certain publishing modes to meet the demands of currently popular text-delivery technologies (such as iPads, Kindles, and smart-phones), expert and specialist peer review is still necessary forlegitimacy,” multiple layers of hierarchical and bureaucratic academic-managerial oversight still obtain while at the same time certain layers of important editorial care and curatorship drop away (due to lack of time, money, readersattention spans, space, etc.), the material archive (the dream of Borgess Babelasian library or even Richard Fenymans 24 million library volumes etched on the head of a pin 8 ) should simply be abandoned, and so on. Being among friends in the glow of the para-academic Outside, I will dispense with the posture of academic politesse, and attempt to say what I really feel: if a radically innovative and public cultural-intellectual milieu is to flourish, and if we are to imagine and hope for future Walter Benjamins who will still attempt to cross borders with manuscripts in briefcases that are more important to them than their very own persons, 9 then what we need now is more (more papers, briefcases, Kindles, iPads, filing cabinets, shelves, teletype machines, Linux code, microchips, mimeographs, lithium batteries, candles, pens, javascripts, and so on) and not less of everything (we need print books as well as e-texts, yellow legal pads as well as the mystic writing pads of our Evernote apps, baroquely lengthy multi-volume works as well as broadsides and post-it note scholarship, close and loving and even co-dependent editorial curatorship of otherswork, and so on), and we also need the courage (or foolishness) to depart to extra-territories not bathed in the harsh fluorescent lighting of the academyproper.” The university will continue to be an important site for keeping open the question of thought 10 and for fostering various modes of dissemination, but I also think its time for a subter-fugitive, vagabond, gypsy para-humanities, especially at a time when so many of us are barely hanging on to the university by the skin of our teeth (or hands or minds). 11 Letsget lostnow, taking the humanities with us like so many suitcases, portable libraries, and sacks of contraband diamonds. Lets figure out inventive ways to radicalize (and thus sustain) the humanities by absconding with them to the streets, alleys, market squares, ateliers, lounges, coffee shops, bookstores, sofas, wine bars, clubs, kitchens, bedrooms, galleries, dive bars, park benches, garages, living rooms, deserted urban zones, and crumbling basements. 12 In short, lets re-boot, lets situate ourselves, like Diogenes on the outskirts of Athens, on the edges of our cities and towns, never losing sight of the places (and institutions) we care about, while also saying, fuck this . Lets embrace a radical, polyglot cosmopolitanism that enunciates ashaggy heart,” where we will haveno fixed abodeand benowhere a foreigner.” 13 Like practitioners of Hakim Beys amour fou , we should strive to beillegalnow, “saturatingourselves with our own aesthetic, engaging in publishing ventures that would fill themselvesto the borderswiththe trajectories of [their] own gestures,” runningon angelsclocks,” our only goal theingestion of the Galaxy,” and never tilting at fates fit only forcommissars & shopkeepers.” 14 One of the things we have lost sight of in the university, and especially in our publishing practices, is the importance of playnow is the time, again cadging from Hakim Bey, toshare the mischievous destinyof runaways, “to meet only as wild children might, locking gazes across a dinner table while adults gibber from behind their masks.” 15 Without non-utilitarian play, and without the right to flail, flounder, and fail while playing, we risk the frigid stasis of the status quo, of always being trapped in what has already been said, what has already been played out . How did we get here? How did the creative arts get so thoroughly de-cathected from theliberalarts? How will we give birth to heretic-misfit love-child thoughts without unbridled play? 16 So much for ontologically anarchic poetics and Beys wild children and crazy love: what about practicalities? Fuck practicality; this aint practical. For me, the most exciting publishing and dissemination ventures going are those such as continent. , Speculations , Itineration , Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies , the Organism for Poetic Research (OPR) and its publication PELT , Uitgeverij Press, eth press: postmedieval poetries, the Hollow Earth Society, the Bruce High Quality Foundation, the Confraternity of Neoflagellants, and so on 17journals, presses, and alternative research-cultural organizations entirely run and managed by graduate students and post-graduates (and some faculty collaborator) with no financial support to speak of and only tenuous footholds in the university (our academic precariat) and who are publishing or fostering some of the most exciting work in the humanities and arts right now, work that eschews and also troubles the waters of disciplinary genre, “review,” privilege, and status. 18 It is one of the aims of punctum books to assist these and other new (extra- but also para-institutional) publishing initiatives with various forms of regular and longer-term support (economic, editorial, aesthetic, technical, promotional, etc.), but who is paying for this? No one; at least, no oneofficial.” Weve simply scraped together what we have; were running on the heady steam of an international all-volunteer staff and gift-share economies, also martinis, WD-40, ramen, loose change, old Talking Heads albums, matches, a glitter ball, and chewing gum. And yet, we actually believe that an open-access and print-on-demand model (in which all of our publications are both free and available for purchase) may actually lead to something like financial solvency and even jobs, but were not making that a condition of our future plans. We aim to grow through a vast network of talented persons (some situated in universities and cultural institutions with paying jobs, some not) dedicated to a radically independent publishing ventureshumanities that would not be beholden to any specific university or commercial academic interest, and to fostering the broadest possible range of open-access print- and e-based platforms for the sustenance of what we are calling awhimsical para-humanities assemblage”—an assemblage, moreover, that refuses to relinquish any possible form of public-ation (the making of cultural-intellectual stealthpublicsthat would seep in and out of institutional and non-institutional spaces, hopefully blurring the boundaries betweeninsideandoutside”), and we are also intent on resuscitating what we are calling postmedieval and pastmodern forms of publication (from breviary and commentary and florilegium to telegram and liner notes and inter-office memo, from the Book of Hours to the cassette mixtape). The termpara-academicwas devised by Nicola Masciandaro, one of punctums founders, to capture the multivalent sense of something that fulfills and/or frustrates the academic from a position of intimate exteriority. Para-academia is that which is beside academia, a place whose logic encompasses many reasons and no reason at all ( para -, “alongside, beyond, altered, contrary,” from Greek para -, “beside, near, from, against, contrary to,” cognate with Sanskrit para -, “beyond”). The para is the domain of: shadow, paradigm, daemon, parasite, supplement, amateur, elite. The para-academic embodies an unofficial excess or extension of the academic that helps, threatens, supports, mocks (par-ody), perfects and/or calls it into question simply by existing next to it. 19 This accords well, I think, with some of the sentiments expressed by the editors of continent. and Speculations during an online conversation they conducted with each other on theaesthetics of (para)academic practice,” where Michael Austin wanted to distinguish between academia and the university—“I take academia to be the culture of knowledge-communication, while the university happens to be the most notable site of such communication in present society. There is no necessary connection between the two, nor should we assume academia requires the university in order to exist”—and Paul Boshears added this important exemplification of Austins comments: “Both Academia and the University are imagined communities, to borrow Benedict Andersons phrase. However, the University is an institution that accredits, controls, and stamps the passports of those that would enter its territory. It is a striated space as opposed to Academias [more] fluid space.” 20 It is punctums aim to occupy this more fluid space but to also de-territorialize the University itself, disturbing and disrupting the Wednesday-ish, business-as-usual protocols of both the generic university studium and its individual cells and holding tanks, while also extending the very important work of the University into new and often untended spaces. Because our press was founded and is directed by premodernists (medievalists and early modernists), 21 we have some serious love of the book as a material art object and we also embrace the idea of the itinerant and also the cloistered scholar. We also can imagine that printed matter might be of some use during and after our own pre- and post-apocalypticAge(s) of Simplification,” while we are also intent on making use of whatevergenerators of electrical essenceswe can get our hands on. 22 We want it all, and were not inclined to ask for permission topretty, pleaselet us publish whatever it is we want to publish. In this sense, we are also impatiently presentist: we want things now, as opposed to later and if we make mistakes, if we speak (or publish) too soon, too hastily, well depend on what Kathleen Fitzpatrick has termed post-publication review 23 to sort that out. What we need now is more, and not less, thought, with more words, ruly and unruly, jostling with each other across the pages and liquid retina displays of our dispersed yet still ex/intimatecommons.” This is not to say that punctum books does not care about the quality of the work it publishes (we wouldnt publish just anything but we would certainly publish almost anything if it were interesting enough and well-written and if it appears to take seriously what we say we are looking topimp”: “writing as risk, adventure, a going-forth withoutpapersor guarantees: falling through the hole/ punctum , a falling down, free-fall. . . . quixotic, sagely mad engagements that generate and satisfy noetic-erotic need, textual thought-bodies that give pleasures only to be possessed in their presence”). Nor is this to say that we do not lavish close and creative attention upon the editing, formatting, and creative design of our publications (indeed, we want to distinguish ourselves in this manner from university and commercial academic presses that increasingly either outsource this work or defer upon authors the responsibility for editing and proofing and sometimes even formatting the layout of their own manuscripts). We are not interested in the maintenance of specific genres or disciplines (is it literary theory? poetry? philosophy? art history? memoir? sociology? cybernetics? speculative fiction? who can tell?), and thus we take seriously Derridas belief in a universitywithout conditionwhich has the task, especially by way of the humanities, of ensuringthe principal right to say everything, whether it be under the heading of fiction and the experimentation of knowledge, and the right to say it publicly, to publish it.” 24 We want a radical Open of thought. This is thus also about freedom, something in very short supply in the university these days, and which also has something to do with well-being, with eudaimonia , or flourishing. But we do not scorn the University-at-large, or even specific institutions (Harvard, University of Chicago, Brooklyn College, Eastern Carolina University, Berkeley, whatever), which is to note (again) that para - is also the space of thebesideand thenear,” and more than wanting to go against or beyond the university, we seek a more supplementary (even inter- or co-dependent) relationship, 25 if also an occasionally antagonistic one. And I am not sure I would draw the same distinctions that some of the editors of continent. and Speculations might want to draw betweenacademiaand theuniversity/University.” For me, the university (similar to how both Michael and Paul described academia/Academia) is everywhere and anywhere I am at any given moment, and this also extends to all who think and write alongside me, in whateverlocation,” virtual, material, or otherwise. The university is not just the buildings and lawns demarcated by specific geographical coordinates (42° 2225N, 71° 638W: Harvard), but anywhere we gather to disseminate : I define this as a practice of, quite literally (following the Oxford English Dictionary ), “scattering [knowledge] abroadandsowingthings andspreading [knowledge] here and there,” anddispersing (things) so as to deposit them in all parts.” Obviously, in some cases, specific locations matter a great deal, and the very hard work of the faculty and student activists to preserve the formerly free system of public higher education in California or to maintain the disciplines of philosophy or paleography at certain universities in the UK are extremely worthwhile and important political-pedagogical causes that we should all support however we can. Wherever persons gather to pro-fess and learn, there is something of value worth protecting, while at the same time, the university proper is increasingly becoming lessliveablefor increasing numbers of teaching faculty and actual and potential learners, and we need to pay attention to that. 26 While some people fight the good fight on the inside of specific campuses and even across specific campuses, some of us will have to be willing to create and foster new domains of thinking-together (which is not the same as thinking alike). This will require risk, and a willingness to fall and tumble into holes. Speaking of holes: punctum , in the idioms of the Middle Ages and Roland Barthes (refer to my first epigraph above), is simultaneously the moment (Augustines punctum ; writing as always momentary ), the pricks and punctures and perforations made by awls punching holes in vellum (what makes writing, but even more so, books , possible, opening-to-writing/writing-as-opening), and also thepointed instrumentthat disturbs the studium , the sting , the speck , and the cut , into and out of which anything might fall or emerge, and by which we feel ourselves pierced (writing as shock to the systemours, our minds, our bodies, but also systems more largely). punctum is also the cast of the dice: were taking chances out here. Its a form of play, but its also work, perhaps the best precarious job at present in the humanities-at-large. NOTES See Princeton Shorts: Short Takes, Big Ideas , and “‘ Bite-sizedReading from SUP ,” Stanford University: The Dish , May 17, 2012. There is something delightfully silly in how the titles of both these book series conjure up images of mens underwear, and it also reminds me that not many university presses are run by women. Palgrave Macmillan also recently announced a shorter-form e-book series, Palgrave Pivot . Jennifer Howard, “ Ditch the Monograph ,” The Chronicle of Higher Education , October 14, 2012. “‘Bite-sizedReading from SUP.” “ About Anvil Academic ,” Anvil Academic . See also Adeline Kohs interview with the head editor of Anvil, Fred Moody: “ A Digital Solution to Academic Publishing? Introducing Anvil Academic ,” ProfHacker [ Chronicle of Higher Education weblog], September 24, 2012. I will note here that Anvil was conceptualized and is managed by a consortium of institutions (such as the Council on Library and Information Resources [CLIR], the National Institute for Technology in Library Education [NITLE], and University of Michigan Librarys MPublishing office, which is also partnered with Open Humanities Press), university scholars, and academic librarians, and is partly funded by various universities with an intensive interest in the digital humanities (such as the University of Virginia, Washington University in Saint Louis, and Stanford University, among others). Anvil appears to not have fully made up its mind whether or not it would offer services to those who might want to publish monographs (whether longer or shorter), edited collections, and journals in digital form (at times, in their various statements, they seem to be saying analog-style digital publishing is passé and not their focus, and at others, that they would welcome helping academics with digital platforms for e-versions of academic monographs, etc.). What does appear clear is that one of their chief motivating impetuses and concerns seems to be ensuring the maintenance of traditional forms of expert peer review, albeit within newly innovative digital publishing environments, and yet, at the same time, what is not clear from their website or published pieces on their project is exactly how (or what ) they plan to offer in the way of technical infrastructures, platforms, and ongoing support for those new (and increasingly networked) environments. “ About Us ,” Zer0 Books . Zer0 Books is a subsidiary of John Hunt Publishing, Ltd., a trade publisher based in the UK, known especially for the books it has published in the genres of spirituality orNew Agestudies (through its O-Books, Dodona, Mantra Books, Moon Books, Soul Rocks, and Circle Books imprints) and also in the genres of parapsychology, esoteric and mystic knowledges, holistic health, juvenile fiction, and erotica, among other subjects. While Zer0 Books is a welcome imprint in the multiverse of what might be calledradicalizedpara-academic publishing, it appears to offer practically no editorial support to its authors and also offers multiple levels ofcontracts,” some of which essentially amount to self-publishing. Why I bother to mention this at all will be more apparent as my little wayzgoose diatribe here gathers more steam. Let it be said, however, that I have regularly purchased titles from this imprint because they are publishing authors whose work I admire (Rob Coley and Dean Lockwood, Mark Fisher, Graham Harman, Steve Shaviro, Eugene Thacker, Ben Woodard, to name some but not all), even while I find Zer0s editorial oversight, such as it is, appallingly uneven. In his opening remarks to theAll in a Jurnals Work: A BABEL Wayzgoosesession (2nd Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group, Boston, MA, 20-22 September 2012), from which my remarks here are culled and expanded upon, Isaac shared with us that, “as we proceed into the autumn with our printing projects always ahead of us and to be done, we will tonight literally be bathed not only by the artificial candlelight of our screens, but as well, in part bathed by photons raining down on us at 186,282 miles per second,” and also thatthese photons that are raining down on us, will rain down on us all winter, [and] have been raining down on us all year . . . had their origin in the combustion cores at a center of 9 cyg, 572 years ago, in 1440, the year which we point to today as the common year in which, as we all know, Gutenberg is said to have brought the movable type press to the western world, inaugurating an era that stretches farther into the past and future than [Marshall] McLuhan could justify.” I would note here that I am in deep admiration of the work of Open Humanities Press , and am especially keen on their experimental writing + publishing modes as evidenced in their Living Books About Life series and Liquid Books imprint, edited by Clare Birchall and Gary Hall, as well as in some of their journals, such as Vectors . From my vantage point, OHP has been consistent in thinkingoutside the boxof traditional university and commercial academic publishing and they have published some of the most radical new thinking in the humanities (albeit somewhat slowly ), but they cannot be viewed as completelyindependentof the university milieu from which all of their Editorial and Open-Access Board members, as well as the members of their Steering Group and Partners, hail. I simply seek a more radical, even anti-peer departure out of the academy for so-calledacademicpublishing, while at the same time I support the idea of the university as one place among others where more radical publishing modes might be cultivated (as is the case with Anvil, OHP, Stanford Shorts, etc.), more on which below. See Richard Fenyman, “ Theres Plenty of Room at the Bottom ,” Engineering and Science 23.5 (February 1960): 2236. See Julian Yates, “ The Briefcase of Walter Benjamin/Benjamin Walters Briefcase: An Invent/ Story ,” rhizomes 20 (Summer 2010. Here, as always, I defer to Bill Readings, The University in Ruins (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1996). An important, more recent companion to Readingsbook is Christopher Newfield, Unmaking the Public University: The Forty-Year Assault on the Middle Class (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008). Im thinking here especially of all the post-grads with no, or contingent, jobs, the adjunct teaching staff, but also those who, for various reasons (including economic constraints), have been cut off or distanced from university life, who hope that they can play a role in intellectuallife,” but who feel increasingly unable to participate. And here I would also pause to praise para-academic educational initiatives and organizations, such as The Public School New York , The Saxifrage School , The Vancouver Institute for Social Research , The Art School in The Art School , and The Brooklyn Institute for Social Research , to name just a few, no matter how long- or short-lived, that take advantage of non-traditional, non-institutional, and anti-hierarchical spaces in which to craft new teaching and learning environments that still value embodied social-pedagogical practices. Julia Kristeva, Strangers to Ourselves , trans. Leon S. Roudiez (New York: Columbia University Press, 1994), 140. Hakim Bey, “Amour Fou,” in Hakim Bey, T.A.Z.: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, Ontological Anarchy, Poetic Terrorism (Brooklyn, NY: Autonomedia, 1991). Bey, “Wild Children,” in T.A.Z. 16. On the importance of artful play to the humanities as well as to well-being, see L.O. Aranye Fradenburg, “Living Chaucer,” Studies in the Age of Chaucer 33 (2011): 4164, where she writes that, “Playing and pretending are crucial to the becomings of living creatures, to adaptation and behavioral flexibility; . . . it is transformative and transforming. We can neither thrive nor survive without it” (57). See also Aranye Fradenburg, “Frontline: The Liberal Arts of Psychoanalysis,” Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry 39.4 (Winter 2011): 589609. See Speculations: A Journal of Speculative Realism , Itineration: Cross-Disciplinary Studies in Rhetoric, Media, and Culture , Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies , Organism for Poetic Research and PELT , Uitgeverij Press , eth press: postmedieval poetries , Hollow Earth Society , Bruce High Quality Foundation , and the Confraternity of Neoflagellants . Or as Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei put it during our BABEL Waygoose session, “Fuck peer review.” And as Vincent also puts it in one of the five maxims for his press, Uitgeverij (meaning simply, “Publisher”), “Only experiment can present the present. We only care about the new, whether past, present, or future. We enjoy publishing anything thats between categories, obscure, or witnessing the edges of language. For us, all audience is potential” (see footnote 17 for Uitgeverijs website address, where you will find all five maxims in a variety of different languages). Nicola Masciandaro, quoted in Eileen Joy, “ PARTY! Or is it a Panel Discussion on Para-Academic Publishing, or BOTH? ” punctum books [weblog], February 20, 2012. Jamie Allen et alia, “ Discussions Before an Encounter ,” continent. 2.2 (2012): 136147. But is it important to note here that punctum books aims to publish books and other types of texts across a wide range of fields and disciplines, and our Advisory Board is made up of scholars and artists who work on diverse subjects, from political science to architecture to feminist philosophy to metal theory to new media studies to art history and beyond. References to Walter M. Miller, Jr., A Canticle for Leibowitz (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co., 1959). See Kathleen Fitzpatrick, “Peer Review,” in Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (New York: New York University Press, 2011), 1549. Jacques Derrida, “The Future of the Profession or the University without Condition (thanks to theHumanities,’ what could take place tomorrow),” in Jacques Derrida and the Humanities: A Critical Reader , ed. Tom Cohen (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2001), 26 [2457]. On the important possibilities of newly imagined co-dependent co-disciplinarities and radically open confraternities as one way of moving the work of the para-“Universityforward, see Jonathan Hsy, “ Lets FAIL Together, yeah yeah YEAH! ” In The Middle , October 5, 2012. As Thomas Gokey, one of Speculations editors, has put it, “In the United States at least, universities have been turned into shell corporations for Sallie Mae. That might sound overly dramatic or overly cynical but I think it is the most accurate way to think about our current situation. Right now the community of questioning, learning, researching and teaching has been captured by a system whose primary function is to extract as much value out of academics as possible. The main thing that universities produce is precarious, indebted, docile workers. Universities are one of the primary tools used to produce and maintain class difference. For the most part the poorest get excluded outright, the richest passGoand collect $200, everyone else gets buried in decades worth of crushing debt for the privilege of receiving an education that will be recognized. An academic is a battery that gets plugged into this dying machine” (Allen et alia, “Discussions Before an Encounter”). (shrink)
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  22. J. Doody, R. Kennedy, K. Paffenroth, C. Harrison & T. J. Weissenberg (2006). Augustine, The Works of Saint AugustineA Translation for the 21st Century. Part I, Vol. 8: On Christian Belief. Hyde Park, NY: New City Press, 2005. P. Burnell, The Augustinian Person. Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 2005. [REVIEW] Augustinian Studies 37 (1):143.score: 21.0
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  23. David M. Evans, Erich Grädel, Geoffrey P. Hellman, Denis Hirschfeldt, Thomas J. Jech, Julia Knight, Michael C. Laskowski, Volker Peckhaus, Wolfram Pohlers & Sławomir Solecki (2005). Vassar College, 124 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, Ny 12604, Usa. In a Review, a ReferenceJsl Xliii 148,” for Example, Refers Either to the Publication Reviewed on Page 148 of Volume 43 of the Journal, or to the Review Itself (Which Contains Full Bibliographical Information for the Reviewed Publication). Analogously, a ReferenceBsl VII 376Refers to the Review Beginning on Page 376 in Volume 7 of This Bulletin, or. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 11 (1):37.score: 21.0
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