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  1. J. Cain (forthcoming). Review Of: Creative Couples in the Sciences, Pycoir, Slack and Abir-Am (Eds). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology.
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  2. James Cain (forthcoming). The Kane-Widerker Objection to Frankfurt Examples. Philosophia:1-9.
    I will argue that the Kane-Widerker objection to Frankfurt examples is much weaker than is generally recognized. The Kane-Widerker objection holds that proponents of Frankfurt examples beg the question against incompatibilist accounts of free and responsible action by constructing examples that tacitly assume a compatibilist account of moral responsibility; that is, they assume that one can have non-derivative responsibility for choices that were not undetermined prior to their occurrence. The notion of an event, E, being ‘undetermined prior to its occurrence’ (...)
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  3. Joe Cain (forthcoming). December 9, 2002 Educational Studies Senior Seminar. Educational Studies.
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  4. James Cain (2014). A Frankfurt Example to End All Frankfurt Examples. Philosophia 42 (1):83-93.
    Frankfurt examples are frequently used in arguments designed to show that agents lacking alternatives, or lacking ‘regulative control’ over their actions, can be morally responsible for what they do. I will maintain that Frankfurt examples can be constructed that undermine those very arguments when applied to actions for which the agent bears fundamental responsibility.
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  5. Jeffrey Cain (2009). After Utopia: Three Post-Personal Subjects Consider the Possibilities William E. Connolly (2008) Capitalism and Christianity, American Style, Durham and London: Duke University Press.Alexander García Düttmann (2007) Philosophy of Exaggeration, Trans. James Phillips, London: Continuum.Adrian Parr (2008) Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. [REVIEW] Deleuze Studies 3 (2):138-143.
  6. Joe Cain (2009). Rethinking the Synthesis Period in Evolutionary Studies. Journal of the History of Biology 42 (4):621 - 648.
    I propose we abandon the unit concept of "the evolutionary synthesis". There was much more to evolutionary studies in the 1920s and 1930s than is suggested in our commonplace narratives of this object in history. Instead, four organising threads capture much of evolutionary studies at this time. First, the nature of species and the process of speciation were dominating, unifying subjects. Second, research into these subjects developed along four main lines, or problem complexes: variation, divergence, isolation, and selection. Some calls (...)
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  7. James Cain (2007). Tracking Reason: Proof, Consequence, and Truth. Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):646-648.
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  8. James Cain (2006). Trinity and Consistency. Faith and Philosophy 23 (1):45-54.
    P. T. Geach has argued that it is impossible to demonstrate that the doctrine of the Trinity is consistent. I try to show why -- on a common understanding of the notion of consistency -- his reasoning is flawed and why, on Geach’s own principles, one should expect that if the doctrine of the Trinity is true then it will be possible to prove that the doctrine is consistent, and it will be possible to do this in a way that (...)
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  9. James Cain (2005). Fred Berthold, Jr God, Evil, and Human Learning: A Critique and Revision of the Free Will Defense in Theodicy. (Albany NY: State University of New York Press, 2004). Pp. VIII+108. $32.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 7914 6041 X. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 41 (4):480-483.
  10. James Cain (2005). Utilitarianism and the Moral Significance of an Individual. Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):53-60.
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  11. Joe Cain (2005). Book Review: Edward J. Larson, Evolution: The Remarkable History of a Scientific Theory (New York: The Modern Library), Xiv + 337 Pp., Illus., $21.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):172-174.
  12. James Cain (2004). Free Will and the Problem of Evil. Religious Studies 40 (4):437-456.
    According to the free-will defence, the exercise of free will by creatures is of such value that God is willing to allow the existence of evil which comes from the misuse of free will. A well-known objection holds that the exercise of free will is compatible with determinism and thus, if God exists, God could have predetermined exactly how the will would be exercised; God could even have predetermined that free will would be exercised sinlessly. Thus, it is held, the (...)
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  13. James Cain (2003). Frankfurt Style Examples. Southwest Philosophy Review 19 (1):221-229.
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  14. J. Cain (2002). Epistemic and Community Transition in American Evolutionary Studies: The 'Committee on Common Problems of Genetics, Paleontology, and Systematics' (1942-1949). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (2):283-313.
    The Committee on Common Problems of Genetics, Paleontology, and Systematics (United States National Research Council) marks part of a critical transition in American evolutionary studies. Launched in 1942 to facilitate cross-training between genetics and paleontology, the Committee was also designed to amplify paleontologist voices in modern studies of evolutionary processes. During coincidental absences of founders George Gaylord Simpson and Theodosius Dobzhansky, an opportunistic Ernst Mayr moved into the project's leadership. Mayr used the opportunity for programmatic reforms he had been pursuing (...)
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  15. J. Cain (2002). Review. Leo Laporte. 2000. George Gaylord Simpson: Paleontologist and Evolutionist. Journal of the History of Biology 35:175-178.
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  16. James Cain (2002). Is the Existence of Heaven Compatible with the Existence of Hell? Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):153-158.
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  17. James Cain (2002). On the Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 38 (3):355-362.
    There is a conception of hell that holds that God punishes some people in a way that brings about endless suffering and unhappiness. An objection to this view holds that such punishment could not be just since it punishes finite sins with infinite suffering. In answer to this objection, it is shown that endless suffering, even intense suffering, is consistent with the suffering being finite. Another objection holds that such punishment is contrary to God's love. A possible response to this (...)
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  18. Joe Cain (2002). Co-Opting Colleagues: Appropriating Dobzhansky's 1936 Lectures at Columbia. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):207 - 219.
    This paper clarifies the chronology surrounding the population geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky's 1937 book, "Genetics and the Origin of Species." Most historians assume (a) Dobzhansky's book began as a series of 'Jesup lectures,' sponsored by the Department of Zoology at Columbia University in 1936, and (b) before these lectures were given, Dobzhansky knew he would produce a volume for the Columbia Biological Series (CBS). Archival evidence forces a rejection of both assumptions. Dobzhansky's 1936 Columbia lectures were not Jesup lectures. The book (...)
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  19. Jeffrey Cain (2001). Ultimate Meaning in the Poetry of Edmund Spenser. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 24 (2):88-105.
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  20. J. Cain (2000). Review. Michael Ruse. 1999. The Darwinian Revolution. Annals of Science 57:460-462.
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  21. Joe Cain (2000). Woodger, Positivism, and the Evolutionary Synthesis. Biology and Philosophy 15 (4):535-551.
    In Unifying Biology, Smocovitis offers a series of claimsregarding the relationship between key actors in the synthesisperiod of evolutionary studies and positivism, especially claimsentailing Joseph Henry Woodger and the Unity of Science Movement.This commentary examines Woodger''s possible relevance to key synthesis actors and challenges Smocovitis'' arguments for theexplanatory relevance of logical positivism, and positivism moregenerally, to synthesis history. Under scrutiny, these arguments areshort on evidence and subject to substantial conceptual confusion.Though plausible, Smocovitis'' minimal interpretation – that somegeneralised form of Comtean (...)
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  22. James Cain (1999). The Theory of Computability Developed in Terms of Satisfaction. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 40 (4):515-532.
    The notion of computability is developed through the study of the behavior of a set of languages interpreted over the natural numbers which contain their own fully defined satisfaction predicate and whose only other vocabulary is limited to0, individual variables, the successor function, the identity relation and operators for disjunction, conjunction, and existential quantification.
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  23. Joe Cain (1999). Essay Review: Progress and Its Problems. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):197-204.
  24. Joe Cain (1999). Review: Progress and Its Problems. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):197 - 204.
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  25. Joe Cain (1999). Why Be My Colleague's Keeper? Moral Justifications for Peer Review. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):531-540.
    Justifying ethical practices is no easy task. This paper considers moral justifications for peer review so as to persuade even the sceptical individualist. Two avenues provide a foundation for that justification: self-interest (the right behaviour is that which maximally serves one’s own interests) and social contract theory (the right behaviour is that which best meets obligations set in binding social contracts). A wider notion of “interest” permits the self-interest approach to justify not only submitting one’s own work to peer review (...)
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  26. J. Cain (1997). Review. Melena Pycior, Nancy Slack and Pnina Abir-Am. 1996. Creative Couples in the Sciences. Journal of the History of Biology 30:311-313.
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  27. Ronald Rainger, Joy Harvey, Mary P. Winsor, Joe Cain & Keith R. Benson (1997). The J. H. B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 30 (2):303-315.
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  28. James Cain (1995). Infinite Utility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):401 – 404.
    Suppose we wish to decide which of a pair of actions has better consequences in a case in which both actions result in infinite utility. Peter Vallentyne and others have proposed that one action has better consequences than a second if there is a time after which the cumulative utility of the first action always outstrips the cumulative utility of the second. I argue against this principle, in particular I show how cases may arise in which up to any point (...)
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  29. James Cain (1995). The Hume-Edwards Principle. Religious Studies 31 (3):323 - 328.
    The Leibniz-Clarke version of the cosmological argument allows for the possibility that there might be a beginningless succession of objects, each produced by earlier objects in the succession, but it is held that a causal question would then arise as to what brought this whole succession of objects into being. This line of thought is commonly said to be confused and an appeal is made to a principle that if a causal explanation has been provided for each member of a (...)
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  30. James Cain (1995). Arithmetic with Satisfaction. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 36 (2):299-303.
    A language in which we can express arithmetic and which contains its own satisfaction predicate (in the style of Kripke's theory of truth) can be formulated using just two nonlogical primitives: (the successor function) and Sat (a satisfaction predicate).
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  31. Katharine Park, Elizabeth B. Kenney, Michael Seltzer, Joseph Cain, Mark V. Barrow Jr & Nancy Slack (1995). The J. H. B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 28 (3):551-563.
  32. Joseph Cain (1994). Ernst Mayr as Community Architect: Launching the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Journalevolution. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (3):387-427.
    Ernst Mayr''s contributions to 20th century biology extend far beyond his defense of certain elements in evolutionary theory. At the center of mid-century efforts in American evolutionary studies to build large research communities, Mayr spearheaded campaigns to create a Society for the Study of Evolution and a dedicated journal,Evolution, in 1946. Begun to offset the prominence ofDrosophila biology and evolutionary genetics, these campaigns changed course repeatedly, as impediments appeared, tactics shifted, and compromises built a growing coalition of support. Preserved, however, (...)
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  33. Gregg Mitman, Garland E. Allen, Joseph Cain, Nancy G. Slack, Keith R. Benson, Lily E. Kay & Alix Cooper (1994). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (2):359-373.
  34. J. M. Cain & J. E. Reagan (1992). Point and Counterpoint. Should Healthcare Ethics Committee Members Be Paid? Hec Forum: An Interdisciplinary Journal on Hospitals' Ethical and Legal Issues 4 (6):378.
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  35. James Cain (1991). Are Analytic Statements Necessarily a Priori? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (3):334 – 337.
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  36. James Cain & Zlatan Damnjanovic (1991). On the Weak Kleene Scheme in Kripke's Theory of Truth. Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (4):1452-1468.
    It is well known that the following features hold of AR + T under the strong Kleene scheme, regardless of the way the language is Gödel numbered: 1. There exist sentences that are neither paradoxical nor grounded. 2. There are 2ℵ0 fixed points. 3. In the minimal fixed point the weakly definable sets (i.e., sets definable as {n∣ A(n) is true in the minimal fixed point where A(x) is a formula of AR + T) are precisely the Π1 1 sets. (...)
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  37. James Cain (1989). The Doctrine of the Trinity and the Logic of Relative Identity. Religious Studies 25 (2):141 - 152.
    I EXPLORE ONE WAY IN WHICH THE THEORY OF RELATIVE IDENTITY (DEVELOPED ALONG LINES SUGGESTED BY GEACH’S WRITINGS) CAN BE USED TO UNDERSTAND THE WAY LANGUAGE FUNCTIONS IN TRINITARIAN DOCTRINE. THIS INCLUDES A DISCUSSION OF REDUPLICATIVE PROPOSITIONS.
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  38. Lindley Darden & Joseph A. Cain (1989). Selection Type Theories. Philosophy of Science 56 (1):106-129.
    Selection type theories solve adaptation problems. Natural selection, clonal selection for antibody production, and selective theories of higher brain function are examples. An abstract characterization of typical selection processes is generated by analyzing and extending previous work on the nature of natural selection. Once constructed, this abstraction provides a useful tool for analyzing the nature of other selection theories and may be of use in new instances of theory construction. This suggests the potential fruitfulness of research to find other theory (...)
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  39. Joseph Allen Cain & Lindley Darden (1988). Hull and Selection. Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):165-171.
  40. James Cain (1985). Some Radical Consequences of Geach's Logical Theories. Analysis 45 (2):83 - 88.
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  41. Joe Cain (ed.) (1943/2004). Exploring the Borderlands: Documents of the Committee on Common Problems of Genetics, Paleontology, and Systematics. American Philosophical Society.
    REPORT OF MEETINGS OF THE COMMITTEE ON COMMON PROBLEMS OF GENETICS AND PALEONTOLOGY {]oint Committee of the Divisions of Geology and Geography. and Biology ...
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