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  1. John Cottingham (forthcoming). Robert MacSwain: Solved by Sacrifice: Austin Farrer, Fideism, and the Evidence of Faith. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-3.
    The book opens with an informative picture of the theological-cum-philosophical climate of Oxford in the period immediately after the Second World War. The Anglican theologian Austin Farrer was a leading figure in an informal discussion group known as “The Metaphysicals,” formed out of dissatisfaction with the then prevailing positivist orthodoxy, which outlawed the grand ‘ultimate’ questions of philosophy as nonsensical. In many ways, MacSwain explains, Farrer was a kind of model for younger members of the group such as Basil Mitchell, (...)
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  2. John Cottingham, Donald Davidson, Dan Dennett, Hanjo Glock, Chris Hookway, Wv Orman, John Searle Quine, Larry Weiskrantz, Kathy Wilkes & Andrew Woodfield (forthcoming). Philosophy News. Cogito.
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  3. John Cottingham (2014). Adrian Moore, The Evolution of Modern Metaphysics: Making Sense of Things (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), Xxi + 668 Pp., £73.00 (Hb); £29.99 (Pb); £25.20 (Eb). [REVIEW] Ratio 27 (3):362-367.
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  4. John Cottingham (2013). Conscience, Guilt, and Shame. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  5. John Cottingham (2013). Descartes and Darwin: Reflections on the Sixth Meditation. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 87 (1):259-277.
    The best way to understand the Meditations is through the lens of Descartes's theistic metaphysics rather than via his programme for physical science. This applies to his use of the concept of ‘nature’ in the Sixth Meditation, which serves Descartes's goal of theodicy. In working this out, Descartes reaches a conclusion about the functional role of sensory perception that is, paradoxically, not far from that offered by Darwinian naturalism. So far from being inherently geared to tracking the truth, the role (...)
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  6. John Cottingham (2013). James Kellenberger Dying to Self and Detachment. (Farnham: Ashgate 2013). Pp. 181. £50.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 1 4094 4390 2. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (4):595-598.
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  7. John Cottingham (2013). The Philosopher and the Gospels: Jesus Through the Lens of Philosophy. By Keith Ward. (Oxford: Lion Hudson, 2011. Pp.192. Price £10.99.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):403-405.
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  8. John Cottingham (2013). The Self: Naturalism, Consciousness, and the First-Person Stance. By Jonardon Ganeri. Oxford University Press, 2012. Xii + 374 Pp, Hb. £40.00 ISBN 978-0-19-965236-5. [REVIEW] Philosophy:1-4.
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  9. J. Cottingham (2012). Faith and Place: An Essay in Embodied Religious Epistemology, by Mark R. Wynn. Mind 121 (482):552-555.
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  10. J. Cottingham (2012). The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World * by Owen Flanagan. Analysis 72 (1):196-198.
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  11. John Cottingham (2012). Floreat Ratio. Ratio 25 (3):365-367.
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  12. John Cottingham (2012). Human Nature and the Transcendent. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 70:233-254.
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  13. John Cottingham (2012). Thomism Out of the Ghetto. The Chesterton Review 38 (1-2):289-291.
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  14. John Cottingham (2012). The Question of Ageing. Philosophical Papers 41 (3):371-396.
    Abstract For humans, as for other animal species, old age is a good, provided that the disease and decrepitude that often accompany it are not so severe as to swamp further flourishing. This accords with Aristotle's holistic account of flourishing, which embraces the entire biological lifespan. However, Aristotle's stress on rational activity as the key to human fulfilment suggests flourishing may be eroded in proportion as the intellectual faculties deteriorate. The Judeo-Christian tradition, by contrast, construes human flourishing primarily in terms (...)
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  15. John Cottingham (2012). Wesley J. Wildman Religious Philosophy as Multidisciplinary Comparative Inquiry: Envisioning a Future for the Philosophy of Religion. (Albany: SUNY Press, 2010). Pp. Xx+376. £20.75 (Hbk). ISBN 978 1 4384 3235 9. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 48 (1):124-127.
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  16. David McPherson & John Cottingham (2012). Philosophy, Spirituality, and the Good Life. Philosophy and Theology 24 (1):85-111.
    This interview with John Cottingham explores some major themes in his recent work in moral philosophy and the philosophy of religion. It begins by discussing his views on the task of philosophy and focuses particularly on philosophy’s role in achieving an overall view of the world and for understanding and achieving the good life. It also discusses some ‘limits of philosophy’ with respect to understanding and achieving the good life; i.e., some ways in which philosophical reflection on the good life (...)
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  17. Thaddeus Metz, John G. Cottingham, Garrett Thomson, Erik J. Wielenberg, John Martin Fischer & Joshua W. Seachris (eds.) (2012). Exploring the Meaning of Life: An Anthology and Guide. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  18. Isis Brook, Mark Whitehead, Katie Mcshane, Clive L. Spash, Robin Attfield, Daniel Baskind, Robert Heath French, Kerry Walker, John Cottingham & Alan Holland (2011). Index to Environmental Values Volume 20, 2011. Environmental Values 20:573-576.
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  19. John Cottingham (2011). Confronting the Cosmos. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85:27-42.
    A long tradition maintains that knowledge of God is naturally available to any human being, without the aid of special divine grace or revelation. St Paul declares that those who fail to recognize the divine authorship of the world are “without excuse.” But the universe as scrutinized by an impartial and rational spectator can seem blank or inscrutable, and those who do not see it as the work of a divine creator do not seem guilty of any error of logic (...)
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  20. John Cottingham (2011). Metaphysics and the Good: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams – Samuel Newlands and Larry M. Jorgenson (Eds). Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):422-424.
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  21. John Cottingham (2011). Reply to Holland... The Meaning of Life and Darwinism. Environmental Values 20 (3):299 - 308.
    While finding no fault with Darwinism as a scientific theory, this paper argues that there are serious problems for the scientistic construal of Darwinism that interprets the universe as nothing but a purely random and contingent flow of events. Life in a godless impersonal universe is beset by contingency, alienation, despair, failure and fragility. Notwithstanding Alan Holland's claim that we can evade these problems though self-affirmation, I argue that human beings can achieve meaningful lives only by acknowledging our dependency and (...)
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  22. John Cottingham (2011). Reviews Wandering in Darkness. Narrative and the Problem of Suffering. By Eleonore Stump. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2010. Xix + 668pp. ISBN 978-0-19-927742-1. Hb. £55. [REVIEW] Philosophy 86 (04):623-627.
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  23. John Cottingham (2011). Sceptical Detachment or Loving Submission to the Good? Reason, Faith, and the Passions in Descartes. Faith and Philosophy 28 (1):44-53.
    The paper begins by challenging a received view of Descartes as preoccupied with scepticism and setting out entirely on his own to build up everything from scratch. In reality, his procedure in the Meditations presupposes trust in the mind’s reliable powers of rational intuition. God, the source of those powers, is never fully eclipsed by the darkness of doubt. The second section establishes some common links between the approach taken by Descartes in the Meditations and the ‘faith seeking understanding’ tradition. (...)
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  24. John Cottingham (2011). Science, Reason, and Religion. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85:27-42.
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  25. J. Cottingham (2010). Between Two Worlds: A Reading of Descartes's Meditations, by John Carriero. Mind 119 (475):786-789.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  26. John Cottingham (2010). Atheists Without Knowing It? Hume's Critique of Mysticism. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 72 (3):461-479.
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  27. John Cottingham (2010). Atheïsten zonder het te weten? Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 72 (3):461.
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  28. John Cottingham (2010). Cartesian Autonomy. In John Cottingham & Peter Hacker (eds.), Mind, Method, and Morality: Essays in Honour of Anthony Kenny. Oup Oxford.
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  29. John Cottingham (2010). Empathy and Ethics. Abstracta 6 (2):13-19.
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  30. John Cottingham (2010). Impartiality and Ethical Formation. In Brian Feltham & John Cottingham (eds.), Partiality and Impartiality: Morality, Special Relationships, and the Wider World. Oup Oxford.
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  31. John Cottingham (2010). Integrity and Fragmentation. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (1):2-14.
    The virtue of integrity does not appear explicitly in either the Aristotelian or the Judaeo- Christian list of virtues, but elements of both ethical systems implicitly acknowledge the importance of a unified and integrated life. This paper argues that integrity is indispensible for a good human life; the fragmented or compartmentalized life is always subject to instability, in so far as unresolved psychological conflicts and tensions may threaten to derail our ethical plans and projects. Achieving a stable and integrated life (...)
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  32. John Cottingham (2010). Meaning and Value. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):34-35.
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  33. John Cottingham (2010). Partiality and Impartiality. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
    Issues of impartiality and partiality are a major focus of debate in moral theory. Should our personal relationships and commitments have a special place in our moral deliberations? Ten specially written essays by experts in the field offer a variety of perspectives, which will interest readers in both theoretical and practical ethics.
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  34. John Cottingham & Peter Hacker (eds.) (2010). Mind, Method and Morality: Essays in Honour of Anthony Kenny. Oxford Univ Pr.
    16 philosophers offer specially written essays on the themes of mind, method and morality in the work of Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, and Wittgenstein.
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  35. Brian Feltham & John Cottingham (eds.) (2010). Partiality and Impartiality: Morality, Special Relationships, and the Wider World. Oxford University Press.
    A central theme of the volume is whether impartiality and partiality are really opposed dimensions or if they can be harmoniously reconciled in one picture of ...
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  36. Anthony Kenny, John Cottingham & P. M. S. Hacker (eds.) (2010). Mind, Method, and Morality: Essays in Honour of Anthony Kenny. Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle -- Aquinas -- Descartes -- Wittgenstein.
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  37. John Cottingham (2009). Descartes on Causation (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 625-626.
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  38. John Cottingham (2009). Happiness, Temporality, Meaning. In Lisa Bortolotti (ed.), Philosophy and Happiness. Palgrave Macmillan. 21.
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  39. John Cottingham (2009). The Fine, the Good and the Meaningful. The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):31-39.
    The vicious person may have considerable enjoyment – much of their life may be, to use a notion that Don Giovanni draws on in one of his arias, diverting. But happiness has to be assessed not in terms of particular pleasurable episodes, but in more holistic terms, over a life taken as a whole. And many moral philosophers, including the atheist Scottish philosopher David Hume in the eighteenth century, have argued that vice can’t make you happy in the long run.
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  40. John Cottingham (2009). The Lessons of Life : Wittgenstein, Religion, and Analytic Philosophy. In P. M. S. Hacker, Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.), Wittgenstein and Analytic Philosophy: Essays for P.M.S. Hacker. Oxford University Press.
     
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  41. John Cottingham (2009). Why Believe? Continuum.
    Belief and its benefits -- Belief, reason, goodness -- Belief and the unknown -- Obstacles to belief -- Belief and meaning -- Learning to believe -- Believing and living.
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  42. John Cottingham (2009). What is Humane Philosophy and Why is It At Risk? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):233-.
    Let me begin with what may seem a very minor point, but one which I think reveals something about how many philosophers today conceive of their subject. During the past few decades, there has been an increasing tendency for references in philosophy books and articles to be formatted in the ‘author and date’ style (‘see Fodor (1996)’, ‘see Smith (2001)’.) A neat and economical reference system, you may think; and it certainly saves space, albeit inconveniencing readers by forcing them to (...)
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  43. Jussi Suikkanen & John Cottingham (eds.) (2009). Essays on Derek Parfit's on What Matters. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In Essays on Derek Parfit's On What Matters, seven leading moral philosophers offer critical evaluations of the central ideas presented in a greatly anticipated new work by world-renowned moral philosopher Derek Parfit. Presents critical assessments of what promises to be one of the key moral philosophy texts of our time Features essays by a team of leading philosophers including Princeton's Michael Smith, one of the world's leading meta-ethicists Addresses Parfit's central thesis - that the main ethical theories can agree on (...)
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  44. John Cottingham (2008). Book Reviews:Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Ethics 119 (1):208-211.
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  45. John Cottingham (2008). Cartesian Reflections: Essays on Descartes's Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    John Cottingham explores central areas of Descartes's rich and wide-ranging philosophical system, including his accounts of thought and language, of freedom and action, of our relationship to the animal domain, and of human morality and the conduct of life. He also examines ways in which his philosophy has been misunderstood. The Cartesian mind-body dualism that is so often attacked is only a part of Descartes's account of what it is to be a thinking, sentient, human creature, and the way he (...)
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  46. John Cottingham (2008). Getting the Right Travel Papers: A Postscript to the Spiritual Dimension. [REVIEW] Philosophy 83 (4):557-567.
    This reply offers a detailed refutation of some of the objections raised in Christopher Coope's extended discussion of "The Spiritual Dimension." It explains the 'nonpartisan' strategy of the book, which Coope systematically misunderstands, and exposes some serious problems with Coope's own preference for a harshly exclusivist form of Christianity. Several issues connected with religious belief are then discussed, including emotional involvement versus detachment in the assessment of religious claims; layers of meaning in religious language; human autonomy and divine authority; the (...)
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  47. John Cottingham (2008). The Good Life and the Radical Contingency of the Ethical. In Daniel Callcut (ed.), Reading Bernard Williams. Routledge. 25--43.
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  48. John Cottingham (2008). The Self, the Good Life and the Transcendent. In Samantha Vice & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Moral Life. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  49. John Cottingham (ed.) (2008). Western Philosophy: An Anthology. Blackwell Pub..
    Western Philosophy: An Anthology provides the most comprehensive and authoritative survey of the Western philosophical tradition from ancient Greece to the leading philosophers of today. Features substantial and carefully chosen excerpts from all the greats of philosophy, arranged thematically and chronologically Readings are introduced and linked together by a lucid philosophical commentary which guides the reader through the key arguments Embraces all the major subfields of philosophy: theory of knowledge and metaphysics, philosophy of mind, religion and science, moral philosophy (theoretical (...)
     
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  50. John Cottingham, Nafsika Athanassoulis & Samantha Vice (eds.) (2008). The Moral Life: Essays in Honour of John Cottingham. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Few contemporary philosophers have made as wide-ranging and insightful a contribution to philosophical debate as John Cottingham. This collection brings together friends, colleagues and former students of Cottingham, to discuss major themes of his work on moral philosophy. Presented in three parts the collection focuses on the debate on partiality, impartiality and character; the role of emotions and reason in the good life; the meaning of a worthwhile life and the place of theistic considerations in it. The original contributions to (...)
     
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