14 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Jean Decety [10]J. Decety [4]
  1. Jean Decety (2011). Dissecting the Neural Mechanisms Mediating Empathy. Emotion Review 3 (1):92-108.
    Empathy is thought to play a key role in motivating prosocial behavior, guiding our preferences and behavioral responses, and providing the affective and motivational base for moral development. While these abilities have traditionally been examined using behavioral methods, recent work in evolutionary biology, developmental and cognitive neuroscience has begun to shed light on the neural circuitry that instantiate them. The purpose of this article is to critically examine the current knowledge in the field of affective neuroscience and provide an integrative (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jean Decety (2011). Promises and Challenges of the Neurobiological Approach to Empathy. Emotion Review 3 (1):115-116.
    Empathy is a complex social cognitive construct. Its scientific investigation requires both a careful analysis of the concepts used as well as a multilevel integrative analysis, including studies with atypical populations, not just neuroimaging data in healthy participants. Further, the fact that the experience of empathy involves both intrapersonal and interpersonal emotional states poses a challenge to neuroscientific investigations.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jean Decety & Andrew N. Meltzoff (2011). Empathy, Imitation, and the Social Brain. In Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 58.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jean Decety, Kalina J. Michalska & Katherine D. Kinzler (2011). The Developmental Neuroscience of Moral Sensitivity. Emotion Review 3 (3):305-307.
    Though traditional accounts of moral development focus on the development of rational and deliberate thinking, recent work in developmental affective neuroscience suggests that moral cognition is tightly related to affective and emotional processing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies show age-related changes in response to empathy-eliciting stimuli, with a gradual shift from the monitoring of somatovisceral responses in young children mediated by the amygdala, insula and medial aspect of the orbitofrontal cortex, to the executive control and evaluation of emotion processing implemented (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jean Decety (2010). To What Extent is the Experience of Empathy Mediated by Shared Neural Circuits? Emotion Review 2 (3):204-207.
    This paper selectively reviews the neurophysiological evidence for shared neural circuits (supposedly implemented by mirror neurons) as the mechanism underlying empathy. I will argue that while the mirror neuron system plays a role in motor resonance, it is not possible to conclude that this system is critically involved in emotion recognition, and there is little evidence for its role in empathy and sympathy. In addition, there is modest support from neurological observations that lesion of the regions involved in the mirror (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jean Decety & Jessica A. Sommerville (2009). Action Representation as the Bedrock of Social Cognition: A Developmental Neuroscience Perspective. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press.
  7. J. Currie, A. Damasio, J. Danckert, C. Darwin, A. S. David, M. Davies, B. Davis, J. Decety, R. C. DeCharmes & K. Delmeire (2005). Crick, F. 222. In Helena De Preester & Veroniek Knockaert (eds.), Body Image and Body Schema. John Benjamins Publishing Company. 329.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jean Decety (2005). Perspective Taking as the Royal Avenue to Empathy. In B. Malle & S. Hodges (eds.), Other Minds. Guilford Press. 135--149.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jean Decety & Jessica A. Sommerville (2003). Shared Representations Between Self and Other: A Social Cognitive Neuroscience View. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (12):527-533.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. J. Decety (2002). Neurophysiological Evidence for Simulation and Action. In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.
  12. Thierry Chaminade & Jean Decety (2001). A Common Framework for Perception and Action: Neuroimaging Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):879-882.
    In recent years, neurophysiological evidence has accumulated in favor of a common coding between perception and execution of action. We review findings from recent neuroimaging experiments in the action domain with three complementary perspectives: perception of action, covert action triggered by perception, and reproduction of perceived action (imitation). All studies point to the parietal cortex as a key region for body movement representation, both observed and performed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. J. Decety (1999). Neural Mechanisms Subserving the Perception of Human Actions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (5):172-178.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jean Decety & Julie Grèzes (1998). A Neurobiological Approach to Imitation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):688-689.
    To explore the neural mechanisms engaged by the perception of action with the intent to imitate, positron emission tomographic activation studies were performed in healthy human subjects. We discuss the results in light of the framework proposed by Byrne & Russon, especially the distinction between mechanisms subserving action-level and program-level imitation.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation