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  1. G. S. Kirk & J. E. Raven (1980). Os Filósofos Pré-Socráticos. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 36 (1):117-119.
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  2. J. E. Raven (1968). Plato's Thought in the Making. Philosophical Review 77 (3):364-366.
  3. David B. Robinson, R. E. Allen & J. E. Raven (1968). Studies in Plato's MetaphysicsPlato's Thought in the Making: A Study of the Development of His Metaphysics. Journal of Hellenic Studies 88:194.
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  4. J. E. Raven (1965/1985). Plato's Thought in the Making: A Study of the Development of His Metaphysics. Greenwood Press.
  5. G. S. Kirk & J. E. Raven (1963). The Pre-Socratic Philosophers. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (51):171-171.
  6. J. B. Skemp, G. S. Kirk & J. E. Raven (1961). The Pre-Socratic Philosophers. A Critical History with a Selection of Texts. Journal of Hellenic Studies 81 (11):182.
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  7. J. E. Raven (1954). The Basis of Anaxagoras' Cosmology. Classical Quarterly 4 (3-4):123-.
    No pre-Socratic philosopher, perhaps, has caused more disagreement, or been more variously interpreted, than Anaxagoras of Clazomenae. Among recent attempts to reconstruct his system some of the more notable are those of Tannery, Bailey, Cornford, Peck, and Vlastos. Each of these reconstructions, and especially that of Tannery, has its adherents; and since none of them has much in common with any other, a universally acceptable solution to the fundamental problems involved may well by now seem unattainable. It is my belief, (...)
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  8. J. E. Raven (1953). Sun, Divided Line, and Cave. Classical Quarterly 3 (1-2):22-.
    It may seem strange, in view of the spate of recent literature on the subject, that yet another article should be forthcoming on what is certainly the most familiar, as well as the most vexed, of all Platonic passages. But it is precisely this spate of literature that has impelled me to write. The time seems to have come for an article which, rather than seeking desperately for something new, sets out instead to reaffirm those facts and conclusions that even (...)
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  9. J. E. Raven (1951). Polyclitus and Pythagoreanism. Classical Quarterly 1 (3-4):147-.
    In a well-known quotation from Speusippus in the Theologumena Arithmeticae , said to have been derived from Pythagorean sources, especially Philolaus, occur the following sentences: And again a little later: Similarly Sextus Empiricus , drawing evidently on a relatively early Pythagorean source, writes as follows: And Aristotle himself writes of the Pythagoreans : There were, in fact, certain Pythagoreans who equated the number 2 with the line because they regarded the line as ‘length without breadth extended between two points’; and (...)
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  10. J. E. Raven (1950). Anaxagoras Felix M. Cleve: The Philosophy of Anaxagoras. An Attempt at Reconstruction. Pp. Xxiv+167. New York: King's Crown Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1949. Cloth, 16s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (3-4):108-109.
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  11. J. E. Raven & B. Farrington (1950). Greek Science, 2: Theophrastus to Galen. Journal of Hellenic Studies 70:98.
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  12. J. E. Raven (1948). Pythagoreans and Eleatics. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.