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Jonathan Ginzburg [16]J. Ginzburg [1]
  1. Jonathan Ginzburg & Shalom Lappin, Using Machine Learning for Non-Sentential Utterance Classification.
    In this paper we investigate the use of machine learning techniques to classify a wide range of non-sentential utterance types in dialogue, a necessary first step in the interpretation of such fragments. We train different learners on a set of contextual features that can be extracted from PoS information. Our results achieve an 87% weighted f-score—a 25% improvement over a simple rule-based algorithm baseline.
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  2. Jonathan Ginzburg & Robin Cooper, Resolving Ellipsis in Clarification.
    We offer a computational analysis of the resolution of ellipsis in certain cases of dialogue clarification. We show that this goes beyond standard techniques used in anaphora and ellipsis resolution and requires operations on highly structured, linguistically heterogeneous representations. We characterize these operations and the representations on which they operate. We offer an analysis couched in a version of Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar combined with a theory of information states (IS).
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  3. Jonathan Ginzburg & Robin Cooper (forthcoming). Quotation Via Dialogical Interaction. Journal of Logic, Language and Information:1-25.
    Quotation has been much studied in philosophy. Given that quotation allows one to diagonalize out of any grammar, there have been comparatively few attempts within the linguistic literature to develop an account within a formal linguistic theory. Nonetheless, given the ubiquity of quotation in natural language, linguists need to explicate the formal mechanisms it employs. The central claim of this paper is that once one assumes a dialogical perspective on language such as provided by the KoS (KoS is not an (...)
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  4. Jonathan Ginzburg (2012). Part Three: Linguistic Perspectives-9 How to Resolve How To. Philosophical Inquiry 36 (1):215.
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  5. Jonathan Ginzburg (2011). How to Resolve How To. In John Bengson & Marc A. Moffett (eds.), Knowing How: Essays on Knowledge, Mind, and Action. Oxford University Press, Usa. 215.
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  6. Shalom Lappin, R. Fernandez & J. Ginzburg, Using Machine Learning for Non-Sentential Utterance Classification.
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  7. Jonathan Ginzburg (2004). Intrinsic Misalignment in Dialogue: Why There is No Unique Context in a Conversation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):197-199.
    Pickering & Garrod's (P&G's) claim that conversationalists do not explicitly keep track of their interlocuters' information states is important. Nonetheless, via alignment, they seem to create a virtually symmetrical view of the information states of speaker and addressee – a key component of their accounts of collaborative utterances and of self-monitoring. As I show, there is significant evidence for intrinsic contextual misalignment between conversationalists that can persist across turns.
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  8. Jonathan Ginzburg & Robin Cooper (2004). Clarification, Ellipsis, and the Nature of Contextual Updates in Dialogue. Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (3):297-365.
    The paper investigates an elliptical construction, Clarification Ellipsis, that occurs in dialogue. We suggest that this provides data that demonstrates that updates resulting from utterances cannot be defined in purely semantic terms, contrary to the prevailing assumptions of existing approaches to dynamic semantics. We offer a computationally oriented analysis of the resolution of ellipsis in certain cases of dialogue clarification. We show that this goes beyond standard techniques used in anaphora and ellipsis resolution and requires operations on highly structured, linguistically (...)
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  9. Jonathan Ginzburg & Enric Vallduví (eds.) (2004). Proceedings of Catalog'04: The 8th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue.
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  10. Martina Faller, Hana Filip, Nissim Francez, Angela Friederici, Marc Gawron, Bart Geurts, Anastasia Giannakidou, Jonathan Ginzburg, Paul Gochet & D. Graff (2003). 782 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Veneeta Dayal Regine Eckardt Paul Elbourne. Linguistics and Philosophy 26:781-782.
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  11. Jonathan Ginzburg (2003). A Quasi-Naïve Semantics for Interrogatives and its Implications. In Javier Gutiérrez-Rexach (ed.), Semantics: Critical Concepts in Linguistics. Routledge. 353--373.
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  12. Helen de Hoop, Paul Dekker, Donka Farkas, Ted Fernald, Tim Fernando, Bart Geurts, Jonathan Ginzburg, Brendan Gillon, Barbara Grosz & Pat Healey (2001). 790 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Ariel Cohen Ann Copestake Robert Cummins. Linguistics and Philosophy 24:789-790.
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  13. Robin Cooper & Jonathan Ginzburg (1996). A Compositional Situation Semantics for Attitude Reports. In Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation. Csli Publications, Stanford. 1--151.
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  14. Jonathan Ginzburg (1996). Interrogatives: Questions, Facts and Dialogue. In Shalom Lappin (ed.), The Handbook of Contemporary Semantic Theory. Blackwell Reference.
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  15. Jonathan Ginzburg (1995). Interrogatives II. Linguistics and Philosophy 18:567-609.
     
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  16. Jonathan Ginzburg (1995). Resolving Questions, I. Linguistics and Philosophy 18 (5):459 - 527.
    The paper is in two parts. In Part I, a semantics for embedded and query uses of interrogatives is put forward, couched within a situation semantics framework. Unlike many previous analyses,questions are not reductively analysed in terms of their answers. This enables us to provide a notion of ananswer that resolves a question which varies across contexts relative to parameters such as goals and inferential capabilities. In Part II of the paper, extensive motivation is provided for an ontology that distinguishes (...)
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  17. Jonathan Ginzburg (1995). Resolving Questions, II. Linguistics and Philosophy 18 (6):567 - 609.
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