Search results for 'J. H. Poole' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. H. Greener, M. Poole, C. Emmett, J. Bond, S. J. Louw & J. C. Hughes (2012). Value Judgements and Conceptual Tensions: Decision-Making in Relation to Hospital Discharge for People with Dementia. Clinical Ethics 7 (4):166-174.score: 870.0
    We reflect, using a vignette, on conceptual tensions and the value judgements that lie behind difficult decisions about whether or not the older person with dementia should return home or move into long-term care following hospital admission. The paper seeks, first, to expose some of the difficulties arising from the assessment of residence capacity, particularly around the nature of evaluative judgements and conceptual tensions inherent in the legal approach to capacity. Secondly, we consider the assessment of best interests around place (...)
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  2. Richard rne, P. C. Lee, N. Njiraini, J. H. Poole, K. Sayialel, S. Sayialel, L. A. Bates & C. J. Moss (2008). Do Elephants Show Empathy? Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):204-225.score: 870.0
    Elephants show a rich social organization and display a number of unusual traits. In this paper, we analyse reports collected over a thirty-five year period, describing behaviour that has the potential to reveal signs of empathic understanding. These include coalition formation, the offering of protection and comfort to others, retrieving and 'babysitting' calves, aiding individuals that would otherwise have difficulty in moving, and removing foreign objects attached to others. These records demonstrate that an elephant is capable of diagnosing animacy and (...)
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  3. M. Shildrick, P. McKeever, S. Abbey, J. Poole & H. Ross (2009). Troubling Dimensions of Heart Transplantation. Medical Humanities 35 (1):35-38.score: 810.0
    Heart transplantation is now the accepted therapy for end-stage heart failure that is resistant to medical treatment. Families of deceased donors routinely are urged to view the heart as a “gift of life” that will enable the donor to live on by extending and sustaining the life of a stranger. In contrast, heart recipients are encouraged to view the organ mechanistically—as a new pump that was rendered a spare, reusable part when a generous stranger died. Psychosocial and psychoanalytic research, anecdotal (...)
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  4. Richard Byrne, Phyllis C. Lee, Norah Njiraini, Joyce H. Poole, Katito Sayialel, Soila Sayialel, L. A. Bates & C. J. Moss (2008). Do Elephants Show Empathy? Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (10-11):10-11.score: 810.0
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  5. Joyce H. Poole & Cynthia J. Moss (2008). Elephant Sociality and Complexity : The Scientific Evidence. In Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.), Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press. 69.score: 810.0
     
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  6. Harold D. Lasswell (1965). Language of Politics. Cambridge, Mass.,M.I.T. Pr..score: 27.0
    Introduction: The language of power, by H. D. Lasswell. Style in the language of politics, by H. D. Lasswell. Why be quantitative? By H. D. Lasswell.--Technique: The problem of validating content analysis, by I. L. Janis. The reliability of content analysis categories, by Abraham Kaplan and J. M. Goldsen. Recording and context units, four ways of coding editorial content, by Alan Grey, David Kaplan and H. D. Lasswell. The feasibility of the use of samples in content analysis, by Alexander Mintz. (...)
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  7. H. Draper, T. Sorell, J. Ives, S. Damery, S. Greenfield, J. Parry, J. Petts & S. Wilson (2010). Non-Professional Healthcare Workers and Ethical Obligations to Work During Pandemic Influenza. Public Health Ethics 3 (1):23-34.score: 15.0
    Most academic papers on ethics in pandemics concentrate on the duties of healthcare professionals. This paper will consider non-professional healthcare workers: do they have a moral obligation to work during an influenza pandemic? If so, is this an obligation that outweighs others they might have, e.g., as parents, and should such an obligation be backed up by the coercive power of law? This paper considers whether non-professional healthcare workers—porters, domestic service workers, catering staff, clerks, IT support workers, etc.—have an obligation (...)
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