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Profile: John Harris
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  1.  68
    John Harris (2007). Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People. Princeton University Press.
    In Enhancing Evolution, leading bioethicist John Harris dismantles objections to genetic engineering, stem-cell research, designer babies, and cloning and makes an ethical case for biotechnology that is both forthright and rigorous.
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  2. Colin W. G. Clifford, Ehsan Arabzadeh & Justin A. Harris (2008). Getting Technical About Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):54-58.
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  3. Jared D. Harris & R. Edward Freeman (forthcoming). The Impossibility of the Separation Thesis: A Response to Joakim Sandberg. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  4. Joseph Harris (1992). Beowulf's Last Words. Speculum 67 (1):1-32.
    “Famous last words” is used nowadays to denote some resolute or confident statement that the speaker will “live to regret,” words that will be contradicted by subsequent events. A mainly trivializing catchphrase that undercuts any definitive correlation between speech and reality, it may have caught on as especially appropriate to the indeterminacies of modern mentality and the ironic mode in the literary scala. Its apparent origin in this sense during the Second World War as a “rejoinder to such fatuous statements (...)
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  5.  30
    James Anthony Harris, Critical Notice on Istvan Hont, Politics in Commercial Society.
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  6. John Harris (2011). Moral Enhancement and Freedom. Bioethics 25 (2):102-111.
    This paper identifies human enhancement as one of the most significant areas of bioethical interest in the last twenty years. It discusses in more detail one area, namely moral enhancement, which is generating significant contemporary interest. The author argues that so far from being susceptible to new forms of high tech manipulation, either genetic, chemical, surgical or neurological, the only reliable methods of moral enhancement, either now or for the foreseeable future, are either those that have been in human and (...)
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  7. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2006). Disability, Enhancement and the Harm -Benefit Continuum. In John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.), Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Publishers
    Suppose that you are soon to be a parent and you learn that there are some simple measures that you can take to make sure that your child will be healthy. In particular, suppose that by following the doctor’s advice, you can prevent your child from having a disability, you can make your child immune from a number of dangerous diseases and you can even enhance its future intelligence. All that is required for this to happen is that you (or (...)
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  8.  83
    J. Harris (2007). NICE Rejoinder. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):467-467.
    The bottom line is that Claxton and Culyer believe, and are on record as saying, that a therapy or procedure is not cost effective if “the health benefits that it is estimated could be gained from the technology are less than those estimated to be forgone by other patients as other procedures are necessarily curtailed or not undertaken. It is this comparison of health gained and health forgone that is at the heart of the rationale of cost-effectiveness analysis”. To estimate (...)
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  9. William Alexander, Keith Anderson, Jane Harris, Julian Ingram, Tom Nelson, Katherine Woods & Judy Svensen, On Good and Bad: Whether Happiness is the Highest Good.
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  10.  83
    J. Harris (1995). The Elimination of Morality. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (4):220-224.
    Anne Maclean has written a book which purports to identify and then definitively to reject the claims which she perceives to be the claims of bioethics. If she is right, then the enterprise to which this journal is dedicated is misconceived and worthless. In this paper, I attempt to show why so far from being not right she is comprehensively wrong, both in her understanding of the nature of bioethics and in the specific moral claims she makes about those she (...)
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  11.  6
    Henry Greely, Barbara Sahakian, John Harris, Ronald Kessler, Gazzaniga C., Campbell Michael, Farah Philip & J. Martha (2008). Towards Responsible Use of Cognitive-Enhancing Drugs by the Healthy. Philosophical Explorations 456 (7223):702--705.
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  12.  93
    J. S. Randolph Harris (forthcoming). John 11:28–37. Interpretation 63 (4):402-404.
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  13.  38
    J. Harris (2005). Scientific Research is a Moral Duty. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):242-248.
    Biomedical research is so important that there is a positive moral obligation to pursue it and to participate in itScience is under attack. In Europe, America, and Australasia in particular, scientists are objects of suspicion and are on the defensive.i“Frankenstein science”5–8 is a phrase never far from the lips of those who take exception to some aspect of science or indeed some supposed abuse by scientists. We should not, however, forget the powerful obligation there is to undertake, support, and participate (...)
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  14.  17
    John Harris (2015). Germline Manipulation and Our Future Worlds. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):30-34.
    Two genetic technologies capable of making heritable changes to the human genome have revived interest in, and in some quarters a very familiar panic concerning, so-called germline interventions. These technologies are: most recently the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to edit genes in non-viable IVF zygotes and Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy the use of which was approved in principle in a landmark vote earlier this year by the United Kingdom Parliament. The possibility of using either of these techniques in humans has encountered the (...)
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  15.  10
    John Harris (2016). Germline Modification and the Burden of Human Existence. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):6-18.
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  16.  78
    John Harris (2013). Moral Progress and Moral Enhancement. Bioethics 27 (5):285-290.
  17.  5
    John Harris (2004). On Cloning. Routledge.
    Cloning - few words have as much potential to grip our imagination or grab the headlines. No longer the stuff of science fiction or Star Wars - it is happening now. Yet human cloning is currently banned throughout the world, and therapeutic cloning banned in many countries. In this highly controversial book, John Harris does a lot more than ask why we are so afraid of cloning. He presents a deft and informed defence of human cloning, carefully exposing the rhetorical (...)
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  18.  77
    John Harris (2013). 'Ethics is for Bad Guys!' Putting the 'Moral' Into Moral Enhancement. Bioethics 27 (3):169-173.
  19.  6
    John Harris (2010). Enhancements Are A Moral Obligation. In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. OUP Oxford
    Sobre Filosofia clinica e Reflexões sobre o que é o humano.
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  20.  32
    James R. Harris (1990). Ethical Values of Individuals at Different Levels in the Organizational Hierarchy of a Single Firm. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (9):741 - 750.
    This study examines the ethical values of respondents by level in the organizational hierarchy of a single firm. It also explores the possible impacts of gender, education and years of experience on respondents' values as well as their perceptions of how the organization and professional associations influence their personal values. Results showed that, although there were differences in individuals' ethical values by hierarchical level, significantly more differences were observed by the length of tenure with the organization. While respondents, as a (...)
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  21. John Harris (1985). The Value of Life. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    This book, like the practice of medicine itself, is about the value of life. Health care is one of the clearest and most visible expressions of a society's ...
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  22. Jared Harris & David Souder (2004). Bad Apples or Bad Bushel?: Ethics, Efficiency, and Capital Market Integrity. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (1/2):201-222.
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  23. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, biotechnology (...)
     
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  24.  81
    Katrien Devolder & John Harris (2007). The Ambiguity of the Embryo: Ethical Inconsistency in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):153–169.
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  25.  6
    Colin W. G. Clifford, Ehsan Arabzadeh & Justin A. Harris (2008). Getting Technical About Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):54-58.
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  26.  38
    John Harris (2012). What It's Like to Be Good. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):293-305.
    In this issue of CQ we introduce a new feature, in which noted bioethicists are invited to reflect on vital current issues. Our first invitee, John Harris, will subsequently assume editorship of this section.
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  27. J. Harris (1997). "Goodbye Dolly?" The Ethics of Human Cloning. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):353-360.
    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations (...)
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  28.  62
    C. Palacios-Gonzalez, J. Harris & G. Testa (2014). Multiplex Parenting: IVG and the Generations to Come. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (11):752-758.
    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell differentiation and reprogramming suggest that functional human gametes could soon be created in vitro. While the ethical debate on the uses of in vitro generated gametes (IVG) was originally constrained by the fact that they could be derived only from embryonic stem cell lines, the advent of somatic cell reprogramming, with the possibility to easily derive human induced pluripotent stem cells from any individual, affords now a major leap in the feasibility of IVG derivation and (...)
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  29. John Harris (1999). The Concept of the Person and the Value of Life. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (4):293-308.
    : The concept of the person has come to be intimately connected with questions about the value of life. It is applied to those sorts of beings who have some special value or moral importance and where we need to prioritize the needs or claims of different sorts of individuals. "Person" is a concept designating individuals like us in some important respects, but possibly including individuals who are very unlike us in other respects. What are these respects and why are (...)
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  30.  5
    Heather Elms, Stephen Brammer, Jared D. Harris & Robert A. Phillips (2010). New Directions in Strategic Management and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):401-425.
    This essay attempts to provide a useful research agenda for researchers in both strategic management and business ethics. We motivate this agenda by suggesting that the two fields started with similar interests, diverged, and are beginning to converge again. We then identify several streams that hold particular promise for developing our understanding of the relationship between strategy and ethics: stakeholder theory, managerial discretion, behavioral strategy, strategy as practice, and environmental sustainability.
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  31. John Harris (1993). Is Gene Therapy a Form of Eugenics? Bioethics 7 (2-3):178-187.
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  32. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2005). Stem Cell Research, Personhood and Sentience. Reproductive Biomedicine Online 10:68-75.
    In this paper the permissibility of stem cell research on early human embryos is defended. It is argued that, in order to have moral status, an individual must have an interest in its own wellbeing. Sentience is a prerequisite for having an interest in avoiding pain, and personhood is a prerequisite for having an interest in the continuation of one's own existence. Early human embryos are not sentient and therefore they are not recipients of direct moral consideration. Early human embryos (...)
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  33.  14
    Tania Bucic, Jennifer Harris & Denni Arli (2012). Ethical Consumers Among the Millennials: A Cross-National Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):113-131.
    Using two samples drawn from contrasting developed and developing countries, this investigation considers the powerful, unique Millennial consumer group and their engagement in ethical consumerism. Specifically, this study explores the levers that promote their ethical consumption and the potential impact of country of residence on cause-related purchase decisions. Three distinct subgroups of ethical consumers emerge among Millennials, providing insight into their concerns and behaviors. Instead of being conceptualized as a single niche market, Millennials should be treated as a collection of (...)
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  34. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2007). In Support of Human Enhancement. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
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  35. James A. Harris (2009). Ryan Nichols, Thomas Reid's Theory of Perception. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 118 (1):112-115.
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  36.  83
    Jared D. Harris (2009). What's Wrong with Executive Compensation? Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):147 - 156.
    I broadly explore the question by examining several common criticisms of CEO pay through both philosophical and empirical lenses. While some criticisms appear to be unfounded, the analysis shows not only that current compensation practices are problematic both from the standpoint of distributive justice and fairness, but also that incentive pay ultimately exacerbates the very agency problem it is purported to solve.
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  37. John Harris (1998). Clones, Genes and Immortality: Ethics and the Genetic Revolution. Oxford University Press.
     
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  38. John Harris (1975). The Survival Lottery. Philosophy 50 (191):81 - 87.
  39.  63
    J. Harris (2003). Organ Procurement: Dead Interests, Living Needs. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (3):130-134.
    Cadaver organs should be automatically availableThe shortage of donor organs and tissue for transplantation constitutes an acute emergency which demands radical rethinking of our policies and radical measures. While estimates vary and are difficult to arrive at there is no doubt that the donor organ shortage costs literally hundreds of thousands of lives every year. “In the world as a whole there are an estimated 700 000 patients on dialysis . . .. In India alone 100 000 new patients present (...)
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  40.  17
    J. Harris (2001). One Principle and Three Fallacies of Disability Studies. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):383-387.
    My critics in this symposium illustrate one principle and three fallacies of disability studies. The principle, which we all share, is that all persons are equal and none are less equal than others. No disability, however slight, nor however severe, implies lesser moral, political or ethical status, worth or value. This is a version of the principle of equality. The three fallacies exhibited by some or all of my critics are the following: Choosing to repair damage or dysfunction or to (...)
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  41.  8
    John Harris (2011). Sparrows, Hedgehogs and Castrati: Reflections on Gender and Enhancement. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (5):262-266.
    In a number of papers, including the one published in this journal, Robert Sparrow has mounted attacks on consequentialism using principally what he takes to be an important fact, which he believes constitutes a reductio ad absurdum of consequentialism in its many forms and of this author's approach to enhancement and disability in particular (see page 276). This fact is the current longer life expectancy of women when compared with men. Here the author argues that Sparrow's arguments and entire approach (...)
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  42. Judith Rich Harris (2009). Attachment Theory Underestimates the Child. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):30-30.
    The problem with elaborations of attachment theory is attachment theory itself. How would a mind that works the way the theory posits have increased its owner's fitness in hunter-gatherer times? The child's mind is more capacious and discerning than attachment theorists give it credit for. Early-appearing, long-lasting personality characteristics, often mistaken for the lingering effects of early experiences, are more likely due to genetic influences on personality.
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  43.  31
    John Harris & Søren Holm (2002). Extending Human Lifespan and the Precautionary Paradox. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (3):355 – 368.
    This paper argues that a precautionary approach to scientific progress of the sort advocated by Walter Glannon with respect to life-extending therapies involves both incoherence and irresolvable paradox. This paper demonstrates the incoherence of the precautionary approach in many circumstances and argues that with respect to life-extending therapies we have at present no persuasive reasons for a moratorium on such research.
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  44.  20
    James R. Harris & Charlotte D. Sutton (1995). Unravelling the Ethical Decision-Making Process: Clues From an Empirical Study Comparingfortune 1 000 Executives and MBA Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):805 - 817.
    Using a nationwide survey, this study compared the ethical values and decision processes ofFortune executives and MBA students. Statistically significant differences in ethical values were found by class of respondent, gender, and professed decision approach. MBAs were also found to process ethical decisions differently than business professionals.
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  45.  14
    J. Harris (2003). Consent and End of Life Decisions. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):10-15.
    This paper discusses the role of consent in decision making generally and its role in end of life decisions in particular. It outlines a conception of autonomy which explains and justifies the role of consent in decision making and criticises some misapplications of the idea of consent, particular the role of fictitious or “proxy” consents.Where the inevitable outcome of a decision must be that a human individual will die and where that individual is a person who can consent, then that (...)
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  46.  88
    J. Harris (2005). It's Not NICE to Discriminate. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):373-375.
    NICE must not say people are not worth treatingThe National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence has proposed that drugs for the treatment of dementia be banned to National Health Service patients on the grounds that their cost is too high and “outside the range of cost effectiveness that might be considered appropriate for the NHS”i.1This is despite NICE’s admission that these drugs are effective in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and despite NICE having approved even more expensive treatments. The (...)
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  47.  40
    Jesse A. Harris & Christopher Potts (2009). Perspective-Shifting with Appositives and Expressives. Linguistics and Philosophy 32 (6):523-552.
    Much earlier work claims that appositives and expressives are invariably speaker-oriented. These claims have recently been challenged, most extensively by Amaral et al. (Linguist and Philos 30(6): 707–749, 2007). We are convinced by this new evidence. The questions we address are (i) how widespread are non-speaker-oriented readings of appositives and expressives, and (ii) what are the underlying linguistic factors that make such readings available? We present two experiments and novel corpus work that bear directly on this issue. We find that (...)
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  48.  20
    Sarah Chan & John Harris (2011). Does a Fish Need a Bicycle? Animals and Evolution in the Age of Biotechnology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):484-492.
    Animals, in the age of biotechnology, are the subjects of a myriad of scientific procedures, interventions, and modifications. They are created, altered, and experimented upon—often with highly beneficial outcomes for humans in terms of knowledge gained and applied, yet not without concern also for the effects upon the experimental subjects themselves: consideration of the use of animals in research remains an intensely debated topic. Concerns for animal welfare in scientific research have, however, been primarily directed at harm to and suffering (...)
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  49.  47
    James A. Harris (2010). Hume on the Moral Obligation to Justice. Hume Studies 36 (1):25-50.
    Our understanding of the philosophers of the past is not always assisted by the attempt to fit them under one or other of the categories that we currently use to map the philosophical landscape. We have grown used to the idea that there are three principal kinds of moral theory—deontological and broadly Kantian, consequentialist and broadly Millian, virtue-theoretic and broadly Aristotelian—and so historical approaches to moral philosophy tend to orientate themselves by assuming that each and every object of study must (...)
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  50.  50
    J. Harris (2005). No Sex Selection Please, We're British. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (5):286-288.
    There is a popular and widely accepted version of the precautionary principle which may be expressed thus: “If you are in a hole—stop digging!”. Tom Baldwin, as Deputy Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority , may be excused for rushing to the defence of the indefensible,1 the HFEA’s sex selection report,2 but not surely for recklessly abandoning so prudent a principle. Baldwin has many complaints about my misrepresenting the HFEA and about my supposed elitist contempt for public opinion; (...)
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