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Profile: Jesse Harris (Pomona College)
Profile: Joshua Harris (Princeton University)
Profile: Jeremy Harris (Victoria University of Wellington)
Profile: Joshua Harris (University College London)
Profile: Jared Harris
Profile: Jennifer Stallworthy (Dawson College)
Profile: Joshua Harris (Trinity Western University)
Profile: Joseph Harris (North Central University)
Profile: Jack Harris
  1. Sarah Chan, John Harris & John Sulston (forthcoming). 1.4 Science and the Social Contract: On the Purposes, Uses and Abuses of Science. Common Knowledge: The Challenge of Transdisciplinarity.
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  2. A. Dufner & J. Harris (forthcoming). Trust and Altruism--Organ Distribution Scandals: Do They Provide Good Reasons to Refuse Posthumous Donation? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv002.
    A recent organ distribution scandal in Germany raises questions of general importance on which many thousands of lives may well depend. The scandal in Germany has produced reactions that are likely to occur whenever and wherever distribution irregularities occur and become public knowledge. After it had become known that physicians in three German hospitals were in the habit of manipulating records in order to fast-track their patients’ cases, the country experienced a decrease of available organs by a staggering 40% in (...)
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  3. J. M. Harris, D. Morgan & M. Ford (forthcoming). Embryo and Fetus. Stem Cell Research and Therapy. Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
     
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  4. J. S. Randolph Harris (forthcoming). John 11:28–37. Interpretation 63 (4):402-404.
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  5. James Harris (ed.) (forthcoming). Oxford Handbook of 18th Century British Philosophy.
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  6. Jared D. Harris & R. Edward Freeman (forthcoming). The Impossibility of the Separation Thesis: A Response to Joakim Sandberg. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  7. John Harris (forthcoming). Fhe Value o (Li (E. Bioethics: An Anthology.
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  8. Joshua Lee Harris (forthcoming). Being, Essence and Substance in Plato and Aristotle Paul Ricoeur Malden, Ma: Polity Press, 2013; 266 Pp.; $24.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue:1-3.
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  9. C. Palacios-González, J. Harris & G. Testa (forthcoming). Multiplex Parenting: IVG and the Generations to Come. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell differentiation and reprogramming suggest that functional human gametes could soon be created in vitro. While the ethical debate on the uses of in vitro generated gametes (IVG) was originally constrained by the fact that they could be derived only from embryonic stem cell lines, the advent of somatic cell reprogramming, with the possibility to easily derive human induced pluripotent stem cells from any individual, affords now a major leap in the feasibility of IVG derivation and (...)
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  10. J. Harris (2019). The Woodpecker In Human Form. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 5 (5):480-496.
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  11. Aaron Garrett & James Harris (eds.) (2015). Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press.
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  12. John Harris & Julian Savulescu (2015). A Debate About Moral Enhancement. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (1):8-22.
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  13. J. Harris (2014). Taking Liberties with Free Fall. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):371-374.
    In his ‘Moral Enhancement, Freedom, and What We Value in Moral Behaviour’,1 David DeGrazia sets out to defend moral bioenhancement from a number of critics, me prominently among them. Here he sets out his stall: "Many scholars doubt what I assert: that there is nothing inherently wrong with MB. Some doubt this on the basis of a conviction that there is something inherently wrong with biomedical enhancement technologies in general. Chief among their objections are the charges that biomedical enhancement is (...)
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  14. John Harris (2014). “. . . How Narrow The Strait!”: The God Machine and the Spirit of Liberty. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):247-260.
    This article explores the consequences of interventions to secure moral enhancement that are at once compulsory and inescapable and of which the subject will be totally unaware. These are encapsulated in an arresting example used by Ingmar Perrson and Julian Savulescu concerning a “God machine” capable of achieving at least three of these four objectives. This article demonstrates that the first objective—namely, moral enhancement—is impossible to achieve by these means and that the remaining three are neither moral nor enhancements nor (...)
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  15. John Harris (2014). Time to Exorcise the Cloning Demon. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):53-62.
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  16. Jonathan Harris (2014). Marie-Hélène Congourdeau, Les Zélotes: Une révolte urbaine à Thessalonique au 14è siècle. Le dossier des sources. (Textes, Dossiers, Documents 18.) Paris: Éditions Beauchesne, 2013. Paper. Pp. 199; map. €28. ISBN: 9782701020013. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (1):179-180.
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  17. Joseph Harris (2014). Svipdagsmál: Gender, Genre, and Reconstruction. In Heike Sahm & Victor Millet (eds.), Narration and Hero: Recounting the Deeds of Heroes in Literature and Art of the Early Medieval Period. De Gruyter. 403-446.
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  18. Nicola J. Williams & John Harris (2014). What is the Harm in Harmful Conception? On Threshold Harms in Non-Identity Cases. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):337-351.
    Has the time come to put to bed the concept of a harm threshold when discussing the ethics of reproductive decision making and the legal limits that should be placed upon it? In this commentary, we defend the claim that there exist good moral reasons, despite the conclusions of the non-identity problem, based on the interests of those we might create, to refrain from bringing to birth individuals whose lives are often described in the philosophical literature as ‘less than worth (...)
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  19. Alastair V. Campbell, Raanan Gillon, Julian Savulescu, John Harris, Soren Holm, H. Martyn Evans, David Greaves, Jane Macnaughton, Deborah Kirklin & Sue Eckstein (2013). The Journal of Medical Ethics and Medical Humanities: Offsprings of the London Medical Group. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):667-668.
    Ted Shotter's founding of the London Medical Group 50 years ago in 1963 had several far reaching implications for medical ethics, as other papers in this issue indicate. Most significant for the joint authors of this short paper was his founding of the quarterly Journal of Medical Ethics in 1975, with Alastair Campbell as its first editor-in-chief. In 1980 Raanan Gillon began his 20-year editorship . Gillon was succeeded in 2001 by Julian Savulescu, followed by John Harris and Soren Holm (...)
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  20. J. Harris (2013). Life in the Cloud and Freedom of Speech. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):307-311.
    This paper is primarily about the personal and public responsibilities of ethics and of ethicists in speaking, writing and commenting publicly about issues of ethical, political and social significance. The paper argues that any such interventions are ‘willy-nilly’, actually or potentially, in the public domain in ways that make any self-conscious decision about intended publics or audiences problematic. In it is argued that a famous, and hitherto useful, distinction relating to the ethical limitations on freedom of speech which we owe (...)
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  21. James A. Harris (2013). The Government of the Passions. In , The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. 270.
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  22. James A. Harris (ed.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first book to provide comprehensive coverage of the full range of philosophical writing in Britain in the eighteenth century. A team of experts provides new accounts of both major and lesser-known thinkers, and explores the diverse approaches in the period to logic and metaphysics, the passions, morality, criticism, and politics.
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  23. John Harris (2013). 'Ethics is for Bad Guys!' Putting the 'Moral' Into Moral Enhancement. Bioethics 27 (3):169-173.
  24. John Harris (2013). Moral Progress and Moral Enhancement. Bioethics 27 (5):285-290.
  25. Joseph Harris (2013). Wilhelm Heizmann and Morten Axboe, eds., Die Goldbrakteaten der Völkerwanderungszeit: Auswertung und Neufunde. (Ergänzungsbände zum Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde 40.) Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 2011. Pp. xiv, 1026; 102 plates. $280. ISBN: 9783110224115. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (1):308-310.
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  26. Craig Stidham & Jeanne Harris (2013). Dynamic Posing Guide: Modern Techniques for Digital Photographers. Wiley.
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  27. Peter Anstey & Jocelyn Harris (2012). Introduction: Women, Philosophy and Literature in the Early Modern Period. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):323-325.
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  28. M. R. Brazier, R. Gillon & J. Harris (2012). Helping Doctors Become Better Doctors: Mary Lobjoit--An Unsung Heroine of Medical Ethics in the UK. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):383-385.
    Medical Ethics has many unsung heros and heroines. Here we celebrate one of these and on telling part of her story hope to place modern medical ethics and bioethics in the UK more centrally within its historical and human contex.
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  29. Tania Bucic, Jennifer Harris & Denni Arli (2012). Ethical Consumers Among the Millennials: A Cross-National Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):113-131.
    Using two samples drawn from contrasting developed and developing countries, this investigation considers the powerful, unique Millennial consumer group and their engagement in ethical consumerism. Specifically, this study explores the levers that promote their ethical consumption and the potential impact of country of residence on cause-related purchase decisions. Three distinct subgroups of ethical consumers emerge among Millennials, providing insight into their concerns and behaviors. Instead of being conceptualized as a single niche market, Millennials should be treated as a collection of (...)
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  30. J. Harris (2012). Sparrow's Song Revisited. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):8-8.
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  31. J. Harris & S. Regmi (2012). Ageism and Equality. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):263-266.
    This paper rebuts suggestions made by Littlejohns et al that NICE is not ageist by analysing the concept of ageism. It recognises the constraints that finite resources impose on decision making bodies such as NICE and then makes a number of positive suggestions as to how NICE might more effectively and more justly intervene in the allocation of scarce resources for health.
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  32. James A. Harris (2012). The Early Reception of Hume's Theory of Justice. In Ruth Savage (ed.), Philosophy and Religion in Enlightenment Britain: New Case Studies. Oxford University Press.
  33. Jocelyn Harris (2012). Philosophy and Sexual Politics in Mary Astell and Samuel Richardson. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):445-463.
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  34. John Harris (2012). Can Kant's Three Formulations of the Categorical Imperative Be Unified? Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (2):91-94.
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  35. John Harris (2012). Stem Cell Research is of Ethical Significance for Three. In Stephen Holland (ed.), Arguing About Bioethics. Routledge. 42.
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  36. John Harris (2012). What It's Like to Be Good. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):293-305.
    In this issue of CQ we introduce a new feature, in which noted bioethicists are invited to reflect on vital current issues. Our first invitee, John Harris, will subsequently assume editorship of this section.
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  37. John Richard Harris & Richard Galvin (2012). 'Pass the Cocoamone, Please': Causal Impotence, Opportunistic Vegetarianism and Act-Utilitarianism. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (3):368 - 383.
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  38. John P. Harris (2012). The Swan's Red-Dipped Foot: Euripides, Ion 161–9. Classical Quarterly 62 (02):510-522.
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  39. Jonathan Harris (2012). Review Howard-Johnston, Witnesses to a World Crisis: Historians and Histories of the Middle East in the Seventh Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. Xvi, 587; Plates and Maps. $199. ISBN: 9780199208593. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (3):881-882.
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  40. Joseph Harris (2012). Kari Ellen Gade, Ed., Poetry From the Kings' Sagas 2: From C. 1035 to C. 1300. (Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2009. Pp. Xi, 914. €140. ISBN: 9782503518978. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (2):554-556.
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  41. Joseph Harris (2012). R. D. Fulk, Ed. And Trans., The “Beowulf” Manuscript: Complete Texts and “The Fight at Finnsburg.” (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, 3.) Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press, 2010. Pp. Xxv, 374. $29.95. ISBN: 978-0674052956. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (1):215-217.
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  42. Joshua Harris (2012). Univocity and Analogy: A Comparative Study of Gilbert Ryle and Martin Heidegger. Diametros 34:34-50.
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  43. C. Rhodes, J. Harris, J. Sulston & C. Spanswick (2012). Provider, Patient and Public Benefits From a NICE Appraisal of Bevacizumab (Avastin). Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):187-189.
    There are several good reasons for the UK Department of Health to recommend the appraisal of bevacizumab for the treatment of eye conditions by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. These reasons will extend to other drugs when similar situations arise in the future.
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  44. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2011). Does a Fish Need a Bicycle? Animals and Evolution in the Age of Biotechnology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):484-492.
    Animals, in the age of biotechnology, are the subjects of a myriad of scientific procedures, interventions, and modifications. They are created, altered, and experimented upon—often with highly beneficial outcomes for humans in terms of knowledge gained and applied, yet not without concern also for the effects upon the experimental subjects themselves: consideration of the use of animals in research remains an intensely debated topic. Concerns for animal welfare in scientific research have, however, been primarily directed at harm to and suffering (...)
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  45. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2011). Moral Enhancement and Pro-Social Behaviour. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):130-131.
    Moral enhancement is a topic that has sparked much current interest in the world of bioethics. The possibility of making people ‘better,’ not just in the conventional enhancement sense of improving health and other desirable qualities and capacities, but by making them somehow more moral, more decent, altogether better people, has attracted attention from both advocates 1 2 and sceptics 3 alike. The concept of moral enhancement, however, is fraught with difficult questions, theoretical and practical. What does it actually mean (...)
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  46. Sarah Chan, Ying-Kiat Zee, Gordon Jayson & John Harris (2011). 'Risky' Research and Participants' Interests: The Ethics of Phase 2C Clinical Trials. Clinical Ethics 6 (2):91-96.
    Biomedical research involving human participants is highly regulated and subject to stringent ethical requirements. Clinical research ethics, regulation and policy have tended to focus almost exclusively on the protection of participants' interests against harms that might result from taking part in research. Less consideration, however, has been given to the interests that patients may themselves have in research participation, even in trials that may be beyond the bounds of current clinical research practice. In this paper, we consider the case of (...)
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  47. J. Harris (2011). Chemical Cognitive Enhancement: Is It Unfair, Unjust, Discriminatory, or Cheating for Healthy Adults to Use Smart Drugs. In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press. 265--272.
     
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  48. J. Harris (2011). Reid and Hume on the Possibility of Character. In Ahnert & Manning (eds.), Character, Self and Sociability in the Scottish Enlightenment. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  49. James A. Harris (2011). Essays on David Hume, Medical Men and the Scottish Enlightenment – Roger Emerson. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):189-192.
  50. James A. Harris (2011). Hume on the Moral Obligation to Justice. Hume Studies 36 (1):25-50.
    Our understanding of the philosophers of the past is not always assisted by the attempt to fit them under one or other of the categories that we currently use to map the philosophical landscape. We have grown used to the idea that there are three principal kinds of moral theory—deontological and broadly Kantian, consequentialist and broadly Millian, virtue-theoretic and broadly Aristotelian—and so historical approaches to moral philosophy tend to orientate themselves by assuming that each and every object of study must (...)
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