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  1. J. Howard Sobel (2006). To My Critics with Appreciation: Responses”. Philosophia Christi 8:249-292.
     
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  2. J. Howard Sobel (1977). The Resurrection of the Dead. Teaching Philosophy 2 (3/4):115-116.
    The material in this note was developed for a first course in logie to illustrate a standard use of logie in analysis. The object was to present a not entirely trivial or artificial confusion that was amenable to resolution using only the tools of quite elementary logic-no modalities, no restrietions to extensional contexts. Copies o f The Problem were distributed. Then, on another day, A Solution.
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  3. J. Howard Sobel (1975). Interaction Problems for Utility Maximizers. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (4):677 - 688.
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  4. J. Howard Sobel (1970). Utilitarianisms: Simple and General. Inquiry 13 (1-4):394 – 449.
    If we overlook no consequences when we assess the act, and no relevant features when we generalize, can it matter whether we ask 'What would happen if everyone did the same?' instead of 'What would happen if this act were performed?'? David Lyons has argued that it cannot. Two examples are here articulated to show that it can. The first turns on the way consequences are identified and assessed and in particular on the treatment accorded 'threshold consequences'. The second example (...)
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  5. J. Howard Sobel (1967). 'Everyone', Consequences, and Generalization Arguments. Inquiry 10 (1-4):373-404.
    This paper addresses issues raised by recent discussion in normative ethics which concern relations between properties of individual actions and of certain groups of actions. First, an ambiguity common to ?everyone can? and ?everyone ought? is examined. Next, a similar ambiguity in talk about consequences is studied; here several procedures for identifying and evaluating consequences are compared. Then a notation that untangles the ambiguities is presented. Next, this notation is employed in an analysis of Marcus Singer's deduction of his generalization (...)
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  6. J. Howard Sobel (1965). Generalization Arguments. Theoria 31 (1):32-60.
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