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  1. N. J. H. Raijmakers, A. van der Heide, P. S. C. Kouwenhoven, G. J. M. W. van Thiel, J. J. M. van Delden & J. A. C. Rietjens (forthcoming). Assistance in Dying for Older People Without a Serious Medical Condition Who Have a Wish to Die: A National Cross-Sectional Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  2. M. K. Schoonman, G. J. M. W. van Thiel & J. J. M. van Delden (forthcoming). Non-Physician-Assisted Suicide in The Netherlands: A Cross-Sectional Survey Among the General Public. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  3. S. L. Niemansburg, M. G. J. L. Habets, J. J. M. Van Delden & A. L. Bredenoord (2014). Disclosure of Risks and Uncertainties Are Especially Vital in Light of Regenerative Medicine. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (4):14-16.
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  4. A. L. Bredenoord, N. A. A. Giesbertz & J. J. M. van Delden (2013). Consent for Medical Device Registries: Commentary on Schofield, B. (2013) The Role of Consent and Individual Autonomy in the PIP Breast Implant Scandal. Public Health Ethics 6 (2):226-229.
    The clinical introduction of medical devices often occurs with relatively little oversight, regulation and (long-term) follow-up. Some recent controversies underscore the weaknesses of the current regime, such as the complications surrounding the metal-on-metal hip implants and the scandal surrounding the global breast implant scare of silicone implants made by France's Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) Company. The absence of national registries hampered the collection of reliable information on the risks and harms of the PIP breast implants. To warrant long-term safety, a (...)
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  5. R. H. H. Groenwold, R. van der Graaf & J. J. M. van Delden (2013). How and When Does Consent Bias Research? American Journal of Bioethics 13 (4):46 - 48.
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  6. R. Janssens, J. J. M. van Delden & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). Palliative Sedation: Not Just Normal Medical Practice. Ethical Reflections on the Royal Dutch Medical Association's Guideline on Palliative Sedation. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):664-668.
    The main premise of the Royal Dutch Medical Association's (RDMA) guideline on palliative sedation is that palliative sedation, contrary to euthanasia, is normal medical practice. Although we do not deny the ethical distinctions between euthanasia and palliative sedation, we will critically analyse the guideline's argumentation strategy with which euthanasia is demarcated from palliative sedation. First, we will analyse the guideline's main premise, which entails that palliative sedation is normal medical treatment. After this, we will critically discuss three crucial propositions of (...)
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  7. H. M. Buiting, M. A. C. Karelse, H. A. A. Brouwers, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, A. van Der Heide & J. J. M. van Delden (2010). Dutch Experience of Monitoring Active Ending of Life for Newborns. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (4):234-237.
    Introduction In 2007, a national review committee was instituted in The Netherlands to review cases of active ending of life for newborns. It was expected that 15–20 cases would be reported. To date, however, only one case has been reported to this committee. Reporting is essential to obtain societal control and transparency; the possible explanations for this lack of reporting were therefore explored. Methods Data on end-of-life decision-making were scrutinised from Dutch nation-wide studies (1995, 2001 and 2005), before institution of (...)
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  8. H. M. Buiting, A. van Der Heide, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, M. L. Rurup, J. A. C. Rietjens, G. Borsboom, P. J. van Der Maas & J. J. M. van Delden (2009). Physicians' Labelling of End-of-Life Practices: A Hypothetical Case Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):24-29.
    Objectives: To investigate why physicians label end-of-life acts as either ‘euthanasia/ending of life’ or ‘alleviation of symptoms/palliative or terminal sedation’, and to study the association of such labelling with intended reporting of these acts. Methods: Questionnaires were sent to a random, stratified sample of 2100 Dutch physicians (response: 55%). They were asked to label six hypothetical end-of-life cases: three ‘standard’ cases and three cases randomly selected (out of 47), that varied according to (1) type of medication, (2) physician’s intention, (3) (...)
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  9. E. J. D. Prinsen & J. J. M. van Delden (2009). Can We Justify Eliminating Coercive Measures in Psychiatry? Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (1):69-73.
    The practice of coercive measures in psychiatry is controversial. Although some have suggested that it may be acceptable if patients are a danger to others or to themselves, others committed themselves to eliminate it. Ethical, legal and clinical considerations become more complex when the mental incapacity is temporary and when the coercive measures serve to restore autonomy. We discuss these issues, addressing the conflict between autonomy and beneficence/non-maleficence, human dignity, the experiences of patients and the effects of coercive measures. We (...)
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  10. G. J. M. W. van Thiel & J. J. M. van Delden (2009). The Justificatory Power of Moral Experience. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):234-237.
    A recurrent issue in the vast amount of literature on reasoning models in ethics is the role and nature of moral intuitions. In this paper, we start from the view that people who work and live in a certain moral practice usually possess specific moral wisdom. If we manage to incorporate their moral intuitions in ethical reasoning, we can arrive at judgements and (modest) theories that grasp a moral experience that generally cannot be found outside the practice. Reflective equilibrium (RE) (...)
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  11. H. M. Buiting, J. K. M. Gevers, J. A. C. Rietjens, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, P. J. van Der Maas, A. van Der Heide & J. J. M. van Delden (2008). Dutch Criteria of Due Care for Physician-Assisted Dying in Medical Practice: A Physician Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e12-e12.
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  12. J. J. M. Van Delden & Margaret P. Battin (2008). Euthanasia: Not Just for Rich Countries. In Ronald M. Green, Aine Donovan & Steven A. Jauss (eds.), Global Bioethics: Issues of Conscience for the Twenty-First Century. Oup Oxford.
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  13. G. J. M. W. van Thiel & J. J. M. van Delden (2008). Phase IV Research: Innovation in Need of Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):415-416.
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  14. J. J. M. van Delden (2007). Terminal Sedation: Source of a Restless Ethical Debate. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):187.
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  15. J. J. M. van Delden (2004). Medical Decision Making in Scarcity Situations. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):207-211.
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  16. J. J. M. van Delden (2004). The Unfeasibility of Requests for Euthanasia in Advance Directives. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):447-451.
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  17. G. J. M. W. van Thiel & J. J. M. van Delden (2001). The Principle of Respect for Autonomy in the Care of Nursing Home Residents. Nursing Ethics 8 (5):419-431.
    Respect for autonomy is well known as a core element of normative views on good care. Most often it is interpreted in a liberal way, with a focus on independence and self-determination. In this article we argue that this interpretation is too narrow in the context of care in nursing homes. With the aim of developing an alternative view on respect for autonomy in this setting we described four interpretations and investigated the moral intuitions (i.e. moral judgements) of caregivers regarding (...)
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