58 found
Order:
See also:
  1.  56
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2005). Is the Immortal Life Worth Living? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58 (1):27 - 36.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  2.  10
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski, The Significance of Insignificance : Two Ways to Learn to Die in an Egocentric World.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  41
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2009). What We Owe the Dead. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):54-70.
    abstract My aim in this paper is to argue that we have at least some obligations to the dead. After briefly considering some previous (unsuccessful) attempts to establish such obligations, I offer a reductio argument which establishes at least some obligations to the dead. Following this, the surprising extent of these obligations (given a few roughly Kantian assumptions) is considered. I then argue that there are and must be some significant limitations on the duties of the living in relation to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  4
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2003). Five Forms of Philosophical Therapy. Philosophy Today 47 (1):53-79.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  5.  68
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2009). Hearing a Still-Ticking Bomb Argument: A Reply to Bufacchi and Arrigo. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):205-209.
    My aim in this paper is to demonstrate that the recent anti-Ticking Bomb argument offered by Bufacchi and Arrigo is unsuccessful. To adequately refute the Ticking Bomb strategy, I claim, requires carefully addressing both policy questions and questions involving exceptional conduct.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  22
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Understanding Torture. Edinburgh University Press.
    Understanding Torture surveys the massive literature surrounding torture, arguing that, once properly understood, there can be no defence of torture in any circumstances.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  54
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2015). The Case for Moral Perception. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):129-148.
    In this paper, I defend the view that we can literally perceive the morally right and wrong, or something near enough. In defending this claim, I will try to meet three primary objectives: to clarify how an investigation into moral phenomenology should proceed, to respond to a number of misconceptions and objections that are most frequently raised against the very idea of moral perception, and to provide a model for how some moral perception can be seen as literal perception. Because (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  13
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2013). In Defense of a Principled Absolutism Against Torture. Philosophy Today 57 (1):114-120.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  10
    Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. John Wiley & Sons.
    The first look at the philosophy behind Stephenie Meyer's bestselling _Twilight_ series Bella and Edward, and their family and friends, have faced countless dangers and philosophical dilemmas in Stephenie Meyer's _Twilight_ novels. This book is the first to explore them, drawing on the wisdom of philosophical heavyweights to answer essential questions such as: What do the struggles of "vegetarian" vampires who control their biological urge for human blood say about free will? Are vampires morally absolved if they kill only animals (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  66
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). It's About Time: Defusing the Ticking Bomb Argument. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):103-116.
    The most common argument in favor of torture in the current literature is the ticking bomb argument. It asks us to imagine a case where only torture can prevent the detonation of a bomb that will kill millions. In this paper, I argue that the seeming effectiveness of this argument rests on two things: 1) the underdetermined semantic content of the term ‘torture,’ and 2) a philosophical attitude that regards the empirical facts about torture as irrelevant. Once we pay attention (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2007). Wittgenstein and Ethical Inquiry: A Defense of Ethics as Clarification. Continuum.
  12.  23
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2004). A Defense of Cannibalism. Public Affairs Quarterly 18 (3):265-272.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  17
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski & Henry Jacoby (2007). Failures of Sight: An Argument for Moral Perception. American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):229 - 244.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  41
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Unwarranted Torture Warrants: A Critique of the Dershowitz Proposal. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):308–321.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  5
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). The Case for Anti-Antirealism: Wittgenstein, Heidegger, and Aristotle on Language and Essence. Philosophical Frontiers: A Journal of Emerging Thought 3 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  9
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). When the Dead Do Not Consent: A Defense of Non-Consensual Organ Use. Public Affairs Quarterly 22 (3):289-309.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  8
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2012). Pavlos Kontos, Aristotle's Moral Realism Reconsidered: Phenomenological Ethics. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (3):193-195.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  18
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2007). Murder, Cannibalism, and Indirect Suicide. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (1):11-21.
    Reeently, a man in Germany was put on trial for killing and consuming another German man. Disgust at this incident was exacerbated when the accused explained that he had placed an advertisement on the internet for someone to be slaughtered and eaten-and that his ‘vietim’ had answered this advertisement. In this paper, I will argue that this disturbing ease should not be seen as morally problematic. I will defend this view by arguing that (1) the so-called ‘vietim’ of this cannibalization (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  9
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2002). Assertions, Clarifications, and Recommendations: Theories of Agency in a Wittgensteinian Key. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (2):135 - 151.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  2
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2015). Perceiving Sympathetically: Moral Perception, Embodiment, and Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Humanities 36 (4):309-319.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  28
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2000). Foucault and Public Autonomy. Continental Philosophy Review 33 (4):417-439.
    In this paper I argue that the social constructionist view found in Foucault''s work does not condemn one to a deterministic portrait of the ''self.'' Attention to the early and late writings allows one to articulate a weak notion of autonomy even under the heavy-handed descriptions found in Foucault''s early work. By recognizing autonomy as a public task, and not as a notion of freedom relegated to particular individuals, one is entitled to view autonomy as present in Foucault''s work - (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  11
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2013). In Defense of a Principled Absolutism Against Torture. Philosophy Today 57 (1):114-120.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  1
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2015). Thaddeus Metz, Meaning in Life. Social Theory and Practice 41 (1):164-170.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  10
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Mourning My Future Death. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (2):54-61.
    My aim in this paper is to offer some critical remarks about the possibility of honestly confronting finitude through the experience of tbe value of the other. I suggest that there is reason to think that an honest confrontation with finitude cannot be so accomplished, and that, moreover, there can be no ‘compensation’ for the fact of finitude. Finally, I suggest that the rhetoric of ‘authenticity’ might not be the most fruitful way of talking about confronting our death.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  13
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Review of Amy Allen, The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
  26.  10
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2011). Review of Kelly Dean Jolley (Ed.), Wittgenstein: Key Concept. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  14
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2005). The Relevance of Rules to a Critical Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):391-419.
    The aim of this article is to argue for a conception of critical social science based on the model of constitutive rules. The author argues that this model is pragmatically superior to those models that employ notions like "illusion" and " ideology," as it does not demand a specification of the "real (but hidden) interests" of social actors. Key Words: constitutive rules • critical theory • ideology • recommendations • social facts.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  3
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Michael Bowler, Heidegger and Aristotle: Philosophy as Praxis Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (1):8-10.
  29.  10
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2006). Strong Evaluations, Criticism, and Agency. Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (1):45-57.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  2
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2011). Mark Johnston , Surviving Death . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (2):104-106.
  31.  2
    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2011). Skerker , Michael . An Ethics of Interrogation .Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. Pp. 280. $49.00 (Cloth). Ethics 121 (3):680-685.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. William Irwin, Kristopher G. Phillips & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2011). Arrested Development and Philosophy: They've Made a Huge Mistake. Wiley.
    _A smart philosophical look at the cult hit television show, _Arrested Development__ _Arrested Development_ earned six Emmy awards, a Golden Globe award, critical acclaim, and a loyal cult following—and then it was canceled. Fortunately, this book steps into the void left by the show's premature demise by exploring the fascinating philosophical issues at the heart of the quirky Bluths and their comic exploits. Whether it's reflecting on Gob's self-deception or digging into Tobias's double entendres, you'll watch your favorite scenes and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. William Irwin, Kristopher G. Phillips & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2011). Arrested Development and Philosophy: They've Made a Huge Mistake. Wiley.
    _A smart philosophical look at the cult hit television show, _Arrested Development__ _Arrested Development_ earned six Emmy awards, a Golden Globe award, critical acclaim, and a loyal cult following—and then it was canceled. Fortunately, this book steps into the void left by the show's premature demise by exploring the fascinating philosophical issues at the heart of the quirky Bluths and their comic exploits. Whether it's reflecting on Gob's self-deception or digging into Tobias's double entendres, you'll watch your favorite scenes and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. William Irwin, Kristopher G. Phillips & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2011). Arrested Development and Philosophy: They've Made a Huge Mistake. Wiley.
    _A smart philosophical look at the cult hit television show, _Arrested Development__ _Arrested Development_ earned six Emmy awards, a Golden Globe award, critical acclaim, and a loyal cult following—and then it was canceled. Fortunately, this book steps into the void left by the show's premature demise by exploring the fascinating philosophical issues at the heart of the quirky Bluths and their comic exploits. Whether it's reflecting on Gob's self-deception or digging into Tobias's double entendres, you'll watch your favorite scenes and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. William Irwin, Kristopher G. Phillips & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2011). Arrested Development and Philosophy: They've Made a Huge Mistake. Wiley.
    _A smart philosophical look at the cult hit television show, _Arrested Development__ _Arrested Development_ earned six Emmy awards, a Golden Globe award, critical acclaim, and a loyal cult following—and then it was canceled. Fortunately, this book steps into the void left by the show's premature demise by exploring the fascinating philosophical issues at the heart of the quirky Bluths and their comic exploits. Whether it's reflecting on Gob's self-deception or digging into Tobias's double entendres, you'll watch your favorite scenes and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel, J. Jeremy Wisnewski & Marlies Ferber (eds.) (2010). Philosophie in Twilight. Wiley-Vch.
    Hier erfahren Sie, wieso Stephenie Meyers Liebesgeschichte so viele Menschen fasziniert und warum es sich dabei um so viel mehr als oberflächliche Jugendliteratur handelt: - Wieso fühlen sich Menschen von Vampiren magisch angezogen? - Sollte Edward seine Fähigkeit zum Gedankenlesen einsetzen? - Ist Edward ein romantischer Held oder einfach nur ein Stalker? - Was sagt der Kampf der "vegetarischen" Cullen-Familien gegen ihren Durst nach menschlichem Blut über den freien Willen aus? - Wird das ewige Leben nicht sogar an der Seite (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. Wiley.
    The first look at the philosophy behind Stephenie Meyer's bestselling _Twilight_ series Bella and Edward, and their family and friends, have faced countless dangers and philosophical dilemmas in Stephenie Meyer's _Twilight_ novels. This book is the first to explore them, drawing on the wisdom of philosophical heavyweights to answer essential questions such as: What do the struggles of "vegetarian" vampires who control their biological urge for human blood say about free will? Are vampires morally absolved if they kill only animals (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. Wiley.
    The first look at the philosophy behind Stephenie Meyer's bestselling _Twilight_ series Bella and Edward, and their family and friends, have faced countless dangers and philosophical dilemmas in Stephenie Meyer's _Twilight_ novels. This book is the first to explore them, drawing on the wisdom of philosophical heavyweights to answer essential questions such as: What do the struggles of "vegetarian" vampires who control their biological urge for human blood say about free will? Are vampires morally absolved if they kill only animals (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. Wiley.
    The first look at the philosophy behind Stephenie Meyer's bestselling _Twilight_ series Bella and Edward, and their family and friends, have faced countless dangers and philosophical dilemmas in Stephenie Meyer's _Twilight_ novels. This book is the first to explore them, drawing on the wisdom of philosophical heavyweights to answer essential questions such as: What do the struggles of "vegetarian" vampires who control their biological urge for human blood say about free will? Are vampires morally absolved if they kill only animals (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
    _ X-Men_ is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy and The Office and Philosophy. (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
    _ X-Men_ is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy and The Office and Philosophy. (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
    _ X-Men_ is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy and The Office and Philosophy. (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
    _X-Men_ is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy and The Office and Philosophy. Rebecca (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Meg Lonergan & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Michael Scott is Going to Die (US). In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell Pub.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Leah McClimans & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2009). Undead Patriarchy and the Possibility of Love. In Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.), Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. John Wiley & Sons 163--75.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Kristopher G. Phillips & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2011). Arrested Development and Philosophy. Wiley.
    _A smart philosophical look at the cult hit television show, _Arrested Development__ _Arrested Development_ earned six Emmy awards, a Golden Globe award, critical acclaim, and a loyal cult following—and then it was canceled. Fortunately, this book steps into the void left by the show's premature demise by exploring the fascinating philosophical issues at the heart of the quirky Bluths and their comic exploits. Whether it's reflecting on Gob's self-deception or digging into Tobias's double entendres, you'll watch your favorite scenes and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  2
    Mark Sanders & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2012). Ethics and Phenomenology. Lexington Books.
    Ethics and Phenomenology examines the relevance of major phenomenologists and phenomenological concepts to ethical inquiry in general, as well as to a broad range of contemporary ethical issues.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Andrew Haas, The Irony of Heidegger Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (2):87-89.
  49. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.) (2009). Family Guy and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Family Guy and Philosophy_ brings together low-brow, potty-mouthed, cartoon humor and high-brow philosophical reflection to deliver an outrageously hilarious and clever exploration of one of TV’s most unrelenting families. Ok, it’s not that high-brow. A sharp, witty and absurd exploration of one of television’s most unrelenting families, the stars of one of the biggest-selling TV series ever on DVD, now in its fourth season Tackles the perennial positions of _Family Guy_ at the same time as contemplating poignant philosophical issues Takes (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.) (2007). Family Guy and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Family Guy and Philosophy_ brings together low-brow, potty-mouthed, cartoon humor and high-brow philosophical reflection to deliver an outrageously hilarious and clever exploration of one of TV’s most unrelenting families. Ok, it’s not that high-brow. A sharp, witty and absurd exploration of one of television’s most unrelenting families, the stars of one of the biggest-selling TV series ever on DVD, now in its fourth season Tackles the perennial positions of _Family Guy_ at the same time as contemplating poignant philosophical issues Takes (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 58