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  1. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (forthcoming). The Case for Moral Perception. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-20.
    In this paper, I defend the view that we can literally perceive the morally right and wrong, or something near enough. In defending this claim, I will try to meet three primary objectives: (1) to clarify how an investigation into moral phenomenology should proceed, (2) to respond to a number of misconceptions and objections that are most frequently raised against the very idea of moral perception, and (3) to provide a model for how some moral perception can be seen as (...)
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  2. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2013). In Defense of a Principled Absolutism Against Torture. Philosophy Today 57 (1):114-120.
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  3. J. Jeremy Wisnewski & Hartwick College, Heidegger, Arthur Fine, and the Natural Ontological Attitude.
    In this paper I argue that Arthur Fine and Martin Heidegger present responses to the dispute between realism and antirealism that are remarkably close in character. Both claim that this dispute arises from a failure to take seriously our everyday experience of things in the world. I argue that it is useful to note the similarity between Fine and Heidegger for two distinct reasons: 1) their view provides a viable alternative to the current realist/antirealist dispute–an alternative that has not been (...)
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  4. Mark Sanders & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2012). Ethics and Phenomenology. Lexington Books.
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  5. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2012). Heidegger: An Introduction. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  6. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2012). Pavlos Kontos, Aristotle's Moral Realism Reconsidered: Phenomenological Ethics. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (3):193-195.
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  7. William Irwin, Kristopher G. Phillips & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2011). Arrested Development and Philosophy: They've Made a Huge Mistake. Wiley.
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  8. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2011). Mark Johnston , Surviving Death . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (2):104-106.
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  9. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2011). Review of Kelly Dean Jolley (Ed.), Wittgenstein: Key Concept. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
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  10. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2011). Skerker , Michael . An Ethics of Interrogation .Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. Pp. 280. $49.00 (Cloth). Ethics 121 (3):680-685.
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  11. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Andrew Haas, The Irony of Heidegger Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (2):87-89.
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  12. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Michael Bowler, Heidegger and Aristotle: Philosophy as Praxis Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (1):8-10.
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  13. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Max H. Bazerman and Ann E. Tenbrunsel , Blindspots: Why We Fail to Do What's Right and What to Do About It . Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 32 (1):3-4.
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  14. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Understanding Torture. Edinburgh University Press.
    Understanding Torture surveys the massive literature surrounding torture, arguing that, once properly understood, there can be no defence of torture in any circumstances.
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  15. Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. John Wiley & Sons.
    The first look at the philosophy behind Stephenie Meyer's bestselling Twilight series, this intriguing text draws on the wisdom of philosophical heavyweights to ...
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  16. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
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  17. Leah McClimans & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2009). Undead Patriarchy and the Possibility of Love. In Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.), Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. John Wiley & Sons. 163--75.
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  18. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2009). Hearing a Still-Ticking Bomb Argument: A Reply to Bufacchi and Arrigo. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):205-209.
    My aim in this paper is to demonstrate that the recent anti-Ticking Bomb argument offered by Bufacchi and Arrigo is unsuccessful. To adequately refute the Ticking Bomb strategy, I claim, requires carefully addressing both policy questions and questions involving exceptional conduct.
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  19. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2009). Richard Matthews, The Absolute Violation: Why Torture Must Be Prohibited. Philosophy in Review 29 (2):120.
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  20. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2009). What We Owe the Dead. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):54-70.
    abstract My aim in this paper is to argue that we have at least some obligations to the dead. After briefly considering some previous (unsuccessful) attempts to establish such obligations, I offer a reductio argument which establishes at least some obligations to the dead. Following this, the surprising extent of these obligations (given a few roughly Kantian assumptions) is considered. I then argue that there are and must be some significant limitations on the duties of the living in relation to (...)
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  21. J. Jeremy Wisnewski & R. D. Emerick (2009). The Ethics Of Torture. Continuum.
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  22. Meg Lonergan & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Michael Scott is Going to Die (US). In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell Pub..
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  23. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). It's About Time: Defusing the Ticking Bomb Argument. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):103-116.
    The most common argument in favor of torture in the current literature is the ticking bomb argument. It asks us to imagine a case where only torture can prevent the detonation of a bomb that will kill millions. In this paper, I argue that the seeming effectiveness of this argument rests on two things: 1) the underdetermined semantic content of the term ‘torture,’ and 2) a philosophical attitude that regards the empirical facts about torture as irrelevant. Once we pay attention (...)
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  24. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Mourning My Future Death. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (2):54-61.
    My aim in this paper is to offer some critical remarks about the possibility of honestly confronting finitude through the experience of tbe value of the other. I suggest that there is reason to think that an honest confrontation with finitude cannot be so accomplished, and that, moreover, there can be no ‘compensation’ for the fact of finitude. Finally, I suggest that the rhetoric of ‘authenticity’ might not be the most fruitful way of talking about confronting our death.
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  25. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Review of Amy Allen, The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
  26. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Screws and Nails : Paper Tigers and Moral Monsters in The Office (US). In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell Pub..
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  27. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). The Case for Anti-Antirealism: Wittgenstein, Heidegger, and Aristotle on Language and Essence. Philosophical Frontiers: A Journal of Emerging Thought 3 (2).
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  28. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). The Politics of Agency: Toward a Pragmatic Philosophical Anthropology. Ashgate.
    This book argues that the traditional emphasis on the accuracy of a given theory of human agency has systematically obscured the normative dimension in these theories and that recognizing this normative dimension allows us to see that a ...
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  29. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). Unwarranted Torture Warrants: A Critique of the Dershowitz Proposal. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):308–321.
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  30. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). When the Dead Do Not Consent: A Defense of Non-Consensual Organ Use. Public Affairs Quarterly 22 (3):289-309.
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  31. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2007). Murder, Cannibalism, and Indirect Suicide. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (1):11-21.
    Reeently, a man in Germany was put on trial for killing and consuming another German man. Disgust at this incident was exacerbated when the accused explained that he had placed an advertisement on the internet for someone to be slaughtered and eaten-and that his ‘vietim’ had answered this advertisement. In this paper, I will argue that this disturbing ease should not be seen as morally problematic. I will defend this view by arguing that (1) the so-called ‘vietim’ of this cannibalization (...)
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  32. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2007). The Phenomenology of Becoming a Runner. In Michael W. Austin (ed.), Running & Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell Pub..
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  33. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2007). Wittgenstein and Ethical Inquiry: A Defense of Ethics as Clarification. Continuum.
  34. J. Jeremy Wisnewski & Henry Jacoby (2007). Failures of Sight: An Argument for Moral Perception. American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):229 - 244.
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  35. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2006). Strong Evaluations, Criticism, and Agency. Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (1):45-57.
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  36. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2005). Is the Immortal Life Worth Living? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58 (1):27 - 36.
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  37. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2005). The Relevance of Rules to a Critical Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):391-419.
    The aim of this article is to argue for a conception of critical social science based on the model of constitutive rules. The author argues that this model is pragmatically superior to those models that employ notions like "illusion" and " ideology," as it does not demand a specification of the "real (but hidden) interests" of social actors. Key Words: constitutive rules • critical theory • ideology • recommendations • social facts.
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  38. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2004). A Defense of Cannibalism. Public Affairs Quarterly 18 (3):265-272.
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  39. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2003). Five Forms of Philosophical Therapy. Philosophy Today 47 (1):53-79.
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  40. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2002). Assertions, Clarifications, and Recommendations: Theories of Agency in a Wittgensteinian Key. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (2):135 - 151.
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  41. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2000). Foucault and Public Autonomy. Continental Philosophy Review 33 (4):417-439.
    In this paper I argue that the social constructionist view found in Foucault''s work does not condemn one to a deterministic portrait of the ''self.'' Attention to the early and late writings allows one to articulate a weak notion of autonomy even under the heavy-handed descriptions found in Foucault''s early work. By recognizing autonomy as a public task, and not as a notion of freedom relegated to particular individuals, one is entitled to view autonomy as present in Foucault''s work - (...)
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