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J. King [57]Jeffrey C. King [37]James King [29]Julie Adair King [20]
James T. King [14]J. E. King [10]Jonathan B. King [9]Jeffrey King [8]

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See also:
Profile: Jeffrey C. King (Rutgers University - New Brunswick)
Profile: James King (Cardiff University)
Profile: Jeff King (University of New South Wales)
Profile: Jo-Anne King
Profile: Jonathan King (Trinity College of the Bible and Theological Seminary)
Profile: Joey King (University of Denver)
Profile: Jon King
Profile: Jessica King
  1.  77
    Jeffrey C. King (2007). The Nature and Structure of Content. Oxford University Press.
    Belief in propositions has had a long and distinguished history in analytic philosophy. Three of the founding fathers of analytic philosophy, Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and G. E. Moore, believed in propositions. Many philosophers since then have shared this belief; and the belief is widely, though certainly not universally, accepted among philosophers today. Among contemporary philosophers who believe in propositions, many, and perhaps even most, take them to be structured entities with individuals, properties, and relations as constituents. For example, (...)
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  2.  22
    Jeffrey C. King (2001). Complex Demonstratives: A Quantificational Account. MIT Press.
    A challenge to the orthodoxy, which shows that quantificational accounts are not only as effective as direct reference accounts but also handle a wider range of ...
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  3.  48
    Jeffrey C. King, Scott Soames & Jeff Speaks (2014). New Thinking About Propositions. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy, science, and common sense all refer to propositions--things we believe and say, and things which are true or false. But there is no consensus on what sorts of things these entities are. Jeffrey C. King, Scott Soames, and Jeff Speaks argue that commitment to propositions is indispensable, and each defend their own views on the debate.
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  4.  32
    Jeffrey C. King (2014). The Metasemantics of Contextual Sensitivity. In Alexi Burgess & Brett Sherman (eds.), Metasemantics: New Essays on the Foundations of Meaning. Oxford University Press 97-118.
    Some contextually sensitive expressions are such that their context independent conventional meanings need to be in some way supplemented in context for the expressions to secure semantic values in those contexts. As we’ll see, it is not clear that there is a paradigm here, but ‘he’ used demonstratively is a clear example of such an expression. Call expressions of this sort supplementives in order to highlight the fact that their context independent meanings need to be supplemented in context for them (...)
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  5. Jeffrey C. King (2003). Tense, Modality, and Semantic Values. Philosophical Perspectives 17 (1):195–246.
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  6.  60
    Jeffrey C. King, Structured Propositions. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  7.  1
    J.-R. King & S. Dehaene (2014). Characterizing the Dynamics of Mental Representations: The Temporal Generalization Method. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (4):203-210.
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  8. Jeffrey C. King (2014). Speaker Intentions in Context. Noûs 48 (2):219-237.
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  9. Jeffrey King (2005). Semantics, Pragmatics, and the Role of Semantic Content. In Zoltan Szabo (ed.), Semantics Versus Pragmatics. Oxford University Press 111--164.
    Followers of Wittgenstein allegedly once held that a meaningful claim to know that p could only be made if there was some doubt about the truth of p. The correct response to this thesis involved appealing to the distinction between the semantic content of a sentence and features attaching (merely) to its use. It is inappropriate to assert a knowledge-claim unless someone in the audience has doubt about what the speaker claims to know. But this fact has nothing to do (...)
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  10.  31
    Jeffrey C. King (2009). Questions of Unity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):257 - 277.
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  11.  12
    Jeffrey C. King (2013). Supplementives, the Coordination Account, and Conflicting Intentions. Philosophical Perspectives 27 (1):288-311.
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  12. Jeffrey C. King (2013). On Fineness of Grain. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):763-781.
    A central job for propositions is to be the objects of the attitudes. Propositions are the things we doubt, believe and suppose. Some philosophers have thought that propositions are sets of possible worlds. But many have become convinced that such an account individuates propositions too coarsely. This raises the question of how finely propositions should be individuated. An account of how finely propositions should be individuated on which they are individuated very finely is sketched. Objections to the effect that the (...)
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  13. Jeffrey C. King (2013). Propositional Unity: What's the Problem, Who has It and Who Solves It? Philosophical Studies 165 (1):71-93.
    At least since Russell’s influential discussion in The Principles of Mathematics, many philosophers have held there is a problem that they call the problem of the unity of the proposition. In a recent paper, I argued that there is no single problem that alone deserves the epithet the problem of the unity of the proposition. I there distinguished three problems or questions, each of which had some right to be called a problem regarding the unity of the (...)
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  14. Jeffrey C. King (2002). Designating Propositions. Philosophical Review 111 (3):341-371.
  15.  66
    Jeffrey C. King (2008). Complex Demonstratives, QI Uses, and Direct Reference. Philosophical Review 117 (1):99-117.
    result from combining the determiners `this' or `that' with syntactically simple or complex common noun phrases such as `woman' or `woman who is taking her skis off'. Thus, `this woman', and `that woman who is taking her skis off' are complex demonstratives. There are also plural complex demonstratives such as `these skis' and `those snowboarders smoking by the gondola'. My book Complex Demonstratives: A Quantificational Account argues against what I call the direct reference account of complex demonstratives (henceforth DRCD) and (...)
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  16.  38
    J. Charles King (1980). A Rationale for Punishment. Journal of Libertarian Studies 4 (2):151-154.
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  17. Jeffrey C. King (2007). What in the World Are the Ways Things Might Have Been? [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 133 (3):443 - 453.
    Robert Stalnaker is an actualist who holds that merely possible worlds are uninstantiated properties that might have been instantiated. Stalnaker also holds that there are no metaphysically impossible worlds: uninstantiated properties that couldn't have been instantiated. These views motivate Stalnaker's "two dimensional" account of the necessary a posteriori on which there is no single proposition that is both necessary and a posteriori. For a (metaphysically) necessary proposition is true in all (metaphysically) possible worlds. If there were necessary a posteriori propositions, (...)
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  18.  71
    Jeffrey C. King (2006). Singular Terms, Reference and Methodology in Semantics. Philosophical Issues 16 (1):141–161.
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  19.  30
    Jeffrey C. King (2006). Semantics for Monists. Mind 115 (460):1023-1058.
    Assume that the only thing before you is a statue made of some alloy. Call those who think that there is one thing before you in such a case monists. Call those who think there are at least two things before you in such a case pluralists. The most common arguments for pluralism run as follows. The statue is claimed to have some property P that the piece of alloy lacks (or vice versa), and hence it is concluded that they (...)
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  20.  93
    Jeffrey King (1996). Structured Propositions and Sentence Structure. Journal of Philosophical Logic 25 (5):495 - 521.
    It is argued that taken together, two widely held claims ((i) sentences express structured propositions whose structures are functions of the structures of sentences expressing them; and (ii) sentences have underlying structures that are the input to semantic interpretation) suggest a simple, plausible theory of propositional structure. According to this theory, the structures of propositions are the same as the structures of the syntactic inputs to semantics they are expressed by. The theory is defended against a variety of objections.
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  21.  1
    Patrick G. T. Healey, Nik Swoboda, Ichiro Umata & James King (2007). Graphical Language Games: Interactional Constraints on Representational Form. Cognitive Science 31 (2):285-309.
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  22.  48
    Jeffrey C. King (1995). Structured Propositions and Complex Predicates. Noûs 29 (4):516-535.
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  23.  65
    Jeffrey King (1982). 'Five O'clock on the Sun': A Reply to J. L. Mackie. Analysis 42 (2):77 -.
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  24.  66
    Jeffrey C. King (1998). What is a Philosophical Analysis? Philosophical Studies 90 (2):155-179.
    It is common for philosophers to offer philosophical accounts or analyses, as they are sometimes called, of knowledge, autonomy, representation, (moral) goodness, reference, and even modesty. These philosophical analyses raise deep questions.What is it that is being analyzed (i.e. what sorts of things are the objects of analysis)? What sort of thing is the analysis itself (a proposition? sentence?)? Under what conditions is an analysis correct? How can a correct analysis be informative? How, if at all, does the production of (...)
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  25.  67
    Jeffrey C. King (2015). Acquaintance, Singular Thought and Propositional Constituency. Philosophical Studies 172 (2):543-560.
    In a recent paper, Armstrong and Stanley argue that despite being initially compelling, a Russellian account of singular thought has deep difficulties. I defend a certain sort of Russellian account of singular thought against their arguments. In the process, I spell out a notion of propositional constituency that is independently motivated and has many attractive features.
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  26.  15
    James King (2001). Lectures on the History of Moral Philosophy. Hume Studies 27 (2):353-355.
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  27.  34
    Jeffrey C. King (1999). Are Complex 'That' Phrases Devices of Direct Reference? Noûs 33 (2):155-182.
  28.  30
    Jeffrey C. King, Anaphora. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  29. Neil Burgess, Suzanna Becker, John A. King & John O'Keefe (2002). Memory for Events and Their Spatial Context: Models and Experiments. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
     
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  30.  16
    J. King (1967). Word and Redemption. Augustinianum 7 (1):176-176.
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  31.  36
    Jeffrey C. King (1988). Are Indefinite Descriptions Ambiguous? Philosophical Studies 53 (3):417 - 440.
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  32.  6
    David Braun, Jeffrey C. King & Edward N. Zalta (2001). The Metaphysics of Reference. Philosophical Perspectives 15:253-359.
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  33.  18
    Judy Kay King (2011). Ticket to Ride the Ancient Celestial Railroad. Semiotics:135-152.
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  34.  1
    J. E. King (2012). Sixteen Questions for Fine and Milonakis. Historical Materialism 20 (3):39-60.
  35.  55
    Jeffrey C. King (2008). Complex Demonstratives as Quantifiers: Objections and Replies. Philosophical Studies 141 (2):209 - 242.
    In “Complex Demonstratives: A Quantificational Account” (MIT Press 2001) (henceforth CD), I argued that complex demonstratives are quantifiers. Many philosophers had held that demonstratives, both simple and complex, are referring terms. Since the publication of CD various objections to the account of complex demonstratives I defended in it have been raised. In the present work, I lay out these objections and respond to them.
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  36.  42
    Jeffrey C. King (1993). Intentional Identity Generalized. Journal of Philosophical Logic 22 (1):61 - 93.
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  37.  58
    John L. King (1978). Chandler on Contingent Identity. Analysis 38 (3):135 - 136.
    In his article "rigid designation" ("journal of philosophy", Volume lxxii, Pages 363-9) hugh s chandler presents an alleged counterexample to the principles that proper names are rigid designators and that identity statements using proper names as designators are non-Contingent. In the present paper this counterexample is shown to rest on a tacit assumption which the principles' proponents need not accept. Chandler's example is redescribed in a way which is both plausible and compatible with the two principles.
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  38.  33
    Jeffrey C. King (1991). Instantial Terms, Anaphora and Arbitrary Objects. Philosophical Studies 61 (3):239 - 265.
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  39.  26
    Jeffrey C. King (1987). Pronouns, Descriptions, and the Semantics of Discourse. Philosophical Studies 51 (3):341--363.
  40.  15
    Jeffrey C. King (2004). Context Dependent Quantifiers and Donkey Anaphora. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (Supplement):97-127.
  41.  9
    J. King (1965). Saint Dominic and His Times. Augustinianum 5 (3):556-556.
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  42.  2
    Jeffrey C. King (2009). Questions of Unity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):257-277.
    In The Principles of Mathematics, Bertrand Russell famously puzzled over something he called the unity of the proposition. Echoing Russell, many philosophers have talked over the years about the question or problem of the unity of the proposition. In fact, I believe that there are a number of quite distinct though related questions all of which can plausibly be taken to be questions regarding the unity of propositions. I state three such questions and show how the theory of propositions defended (...)
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  43.  58
    Jeffrey King & Michael Liston (1984). Explaining Donnellan's Distinction. Analysis 44 (1):13 - 14.
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  44.  8
    J. Robin King (1978). Thomas Mann's Joseph and His Brothers. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 53 (4):416-432.
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  45.  4
    Markus Ullsperger & Joseph A. King (2010). Proactive and Reactive Recruitment of Cognitive Control: Comment on Hikosaka and Isoda. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (5):191-192.
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  46. Jeffrey King (2002). Two Sorts of Claim About 'Logical Form'. In Gerhard Preyer Georg Peter (ed.), Logical Form and Language. Clarendon Press
     
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  47.  8
    James King & James W. Dye (1975). The Unity of the Platonic Dialogue. Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (2):247-250.
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  48.  11
    Benjamin Moulton & Jaime S. King (2010). Aligning Ethics with Medical Decision-Making: The Quest for Informed Patient Choice. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (1):85-97.
    Clinical evidence suggests that many patients undergo surgery that they would decline if fully informed. Failure to communicate the relevant risks, benefits, and alternatives of a procedure violates medical ethics and wastes medical resources. Integrating shared decision-making, a method of communication between provider and patient, into medical decisions can satisfy physicians' ethical obligations and reduce unwanted procedures. This article proposes a three-step process for implementing a nationwide practice of shared decision-making: create model integration programs; provide legal incentives to ease the (...)
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  49.  18
    James T. King (1975). Legal Rationality and the Problem of International Law. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 49:116-124.
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  50.  26
    Jonathan B. King (1993). Learning to Solve the Right Problems: The Case of Nuclear Power in America. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):105 - 116.
    Three general types of problems entail different strategies. Continuing to seek solutions to tame problems when we face messes, let alone wicked problems, is potentially catastrophic hence fundamentally irresponsible. In our turbulent times, it is therefore becoming a strategic necessity to learn how to solve the right problems. Successful problem solving requires finding the right solution to the right problem. We fail more often because we solve the wrong problem than because we get the wrong solution to the right problem. (...)
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