5 found
Sort by:
  1. J. L. Creed (1987). The Development of Plato's Political Theory By George Klosko New York and London: Methuen, 1986,Xx+263 Pp., £6.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy 62 (239):109-.
  2. J. L. Creed (1985). H. D. Rankin: Sophists, Socratics and Cynics. Pp. 263. London and Canberra: Croom Helm; Totowa, New Jersey: Barnes and Noble Books, 1983. £17.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (01):198-199.
  3. J. L. Creed & L. Versenyi (1984). Holiness and Justice: An Interpretation of Plato's Euthyphro. Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:205.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. J. L. Creed (1978). Is It Wrong to Call Plato A Utilitarian? Classical Quarterly 28 (02):349-.
    Such is John Stuart Mill's succinct exposition of the core of utilitarian theory. A contemporary philosopher has aptly described utilitarianism as ‘the combination of two principles: the consequentialist principle that the rightness, or wrongness, of an action is determined by the goodness, or badness, of the results that flow from it and the hedonist principle that the only thing that is good in itself is pleasure and the only thing bad in itself is pain. Although the consequentialistprinciple has attracted the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. J. L. Creed (1973). Moral Values in the Age of Thucydides. Classical Quarterly 23 (02):213-.
    Thucydides describes Antipho as ‘inferior to no one of his time in and more capable than any of initiating ideas and giving expression to them’. What does he mean here by? Does it refer to ability? or does it refer to courage and consistency of principle? and in either case how are we to relate this description of Antipho to Thucydides description of Nicias as less worthy than any other Greek of the historian's day to meet with the misfortunes that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation