Search results for 'J. L. Hernandez' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Pura Nieto Hernández (2005). Calame and Detienne on Myth C. Calame: Myth and History in Ancient Greece. The Symbolic Creation of a Colony . Translated by D. W. Berman. Pp. Xx + 178. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2003 (First Published as Mythe Et Histoire Dans l'Antiquité Grecque. La Création Symbolique d'Une Colonie , 1996). Cased, £26.95. ISBN: 0-691-11458-7. M. Detienne: The Writing of Orpheus. Greek Myth in Cultural Context . Translated by J. Lloyd. Pp. Xvi + 199. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003 (First Published as L'écriture d'Orphée , 1989). Cased, £39.50. ISBN: 0-8018-6954-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):500-.
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  2.  3
    Michael Lloyd (2011). (J.) Jouanna, (F.) Montanari and (A.-C.) Hernández Eds. Eschyle À l'Aube du Théâtre Occidental: Neuf Exposés Suivis de Discussions (Entretiens Sur l'Antiquité Classique 55). Vandœuvres-Geneva: Fondation Hardt, 2009. Pp. Xi + 510. Sw.Fr.85. 9782600007559. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 131:183-184.
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  3.  84
    James Elliott (forthcoming). The Power of Humility in Sceptical Religion: Why Ietsism is Preferable to J. L. Schellenberg's Ultimism. Religious Studies:1-20.
    J. L. Schellenberg’s Philosophy of Religion argues for a specific brand of sceptical religion that takes ‘Ultimism’ – the proposition that there is a metaphysically, axiologically, and soteriologically ultimate reality – to be the object to which the sceptical religionist should assent. In this article I shall argue that Ietsism – the proposition that there is merely something transcendental worth committing ourselves to religiously – is a preferable object of assent. This is for two primary reasons. First, Ietsism is far (...)
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  4.  12
    G. J. Warnock (1989/1999). J.L. Austin. Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  5.  34
    J. O. Urmson & G. J. Warnock (1961). J. L. Austin. Mind 70 (278):256-257.
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  6.  4
    J. W. Roxbee Cox & Mats Furberg (1966). Locutionary and Illocutionary Acts: A Main Theme in J. L. Austin's Philosophy. Philosophical Quarterly 16 (62):80.
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  7.  32
    Isaiah Berlin (ed.) (1973). Essays on J. L. Austin. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
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  8. Joe Friggieri (1981). Linguaggio E Azione Saggio Su J. L. Austin. Vita E Pensiero.
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  9. Markus H. Wörner (1978). Performative Und Sprachliches Handeln Ein Beitrag Zu J.L. Austins Theorie der Sprechakte. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  10. Fritz J. McDonald (2013). New Waves in Metaethics By Michael Brady * New Waves in Truth By Cory D. Wright and Nikolaj J.L.L. Pedersen. Analysis 73 (2):400-402.
    Review of New Waves in Metaethics, edited by Michael Brady; and New Waves in Truth, edited by Cory D. Wright and Nikolaj J.L.L. Pedersen.
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  11.  20
    William J. Meyer (2014). J. L. Schellenberg: Evolutionary Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (2):223-227.
    Rarely have I begun a book with such keen enthusiasm only later to cool to a deep but respectful ambivalence. In this clearly written and thoughtful monograph, Canadian analytic philosopher J. L. Schellenberg spurs readers to think about religion in evolutionary terms analogous to how Darwin and others have taught us to think about nature. As I will outline, I think he has mixed success in this engaging endeavor.Schellenberg’s valuable insight, and the source of my initial enthusiasm, is his emphasis (...)
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  12. Nat Hansen (2012). J. L. Austin and Literal Meaning. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):617-632.
    Alice Crary has recently developed a radical reading of J. L. Austin's philosophy of language. The central contention of Crary's reading is that Austin gives convincing reasons to reject the idea that sentences have context-invariant literal meaning. While I am in sympathy with Crary about the continuing importance of Austin's work, and I think Crary's reading is deep and interesting, I do not think literal sentence meaning is one of Austin's targets, and the arguments that Crary attributes to Austin or (...)
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  13. Alice Crary (2002). The Happy Truth: J. L. Austin's How to Do Things with Words. Inquiry 45 (1):59 – 80.
    This article aims to disrupt received views about the significance of J. L. Austin's contribution to philosophy of language. Its focus is Austin's 1955 lectures How To Do Things With Words . Commentators on the lectures in both philosophical and literary-theoretical circles, despite conspicuous differences, tend to agree in attributing to Austin an assumption about the relation between literal meaning and truth, which is in fact his central critical target. The goal of the article is to correct this misunderstanding and (...)
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  14.  1
    J. L. Mackie (1978). The Law of the Jungle: Moral Alternatives and Principles of Evolution: J. L. Mackie. Philosophy 53 (206):455-464.
    When people speak of ‘the law of the jungle’, they usually mean unions restrained and ruthless competition, with everyone out solely for his own advantage. But the phrase was coined by Rudyard Kipling, in The Second Jungle Book , and he meant something very different. His law of the jungle is a law that wolves in a pack are supposed to obey. His poem says that ‘the strength of the Pack is the Wolf, and the strength of the Wolf is (...)
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  15.  12
    K. T. Fann (1969). Symposium on J. L. Austin. New York, Humanities P..
    J. L. Austin (1911-1960) exercised in Post-war Oxford an intellectual authority similar to that of Wittgenstein in Cambridge. Although he completed no books of his own and published only seven papers, Austin became through lectures and talks one of the acknowledged leaders in what is called ‘Oxford philosophy’ or ‘ordinary language philosophy’. Few would dispute that among analytic philosophers Austin stands out as a great and original philosophical genius. Three volumes of his writing, published after his death, have become classics (...)
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  16.  46
    Edouard Machery, Jean-Louis Dessalles, Fiona Cowie & Jason Alexander (2010). Symposium on J.-L. Dessalles's Why We Talk (OUP, 2007): Precis by J.-L. Dessalles, Commentaries by E. Machery, F. Cowie, and J. Alexander, Replies by J.-L. Dessalles. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):851-901.
    This symposium discusses J.-L. Dessalles's account of the evolution of language, which was presented in Why we Talk (OUP 2007).
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  17.  33
    M. de Gaynesford (2011). How Not To Do Things With Words: J. L. Austin on Poetry. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (1):31-49.
    If philosophy and poetry are to illuminate each other, we should first understand their tendencies to mutual antipathy. Examining (and, where possible, correcting) mutual misapprehension is part of this task. J. L. Austin's remarks on poetry offer one such point of entry: they are often cited by poets and critics as an example of philosophy's blindness to poetry (I). These remarks are complex and their purpose obscure—more so than those who take exception to them usually allow or admit (II). But (...)
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  18.  4
    J. L. Schellenberg (1994). Religious Experience and Religious Diversity: A Reply to Alston: J. L. SCHELLENBERG. Religious Studies 30 (2):151-159.
    William Alston's Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience is a most significant contribution to the philosophy of religion. The product of 50 years' reflection on its topic , this work provides a very thorough explication and defence of what Alston calls the ‘mystical perceptual practice’ – the practice of forming beliefs about the Ultimate on the basis of putative ‘direct experiential awareness’ thereof . Alston argues, in particular, for the rationality of engaging in the Christian form of MP . (...)
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  19. Jackson (ed.) (1992). J.L. Mehta on Heidegger, Hermeneutics and Indian Tradition. Brill.
    In these essays, J.L. Mehta, Indian philosopher in whose life and work East and West met profoundly, reflects on the origins and potency of modern hermeneutics and phenomenology, and applies the principles of interpretation to Hindu traditions. These farseeing essays show a hopeful way for non-Western cultures to gain insight into the basic presuppositions of the Western world, and to reclaim their own origins and ways of thinking, and to participate in an emerging planetary thinking.
     
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  20.  19
    Hui-Chieh Loy (2002). What Has J. L. Austin to Do with Confucius? International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):193-208.
    In the first chapter of Confucius: The Secular as Sacred, Herbert Fingarette argues that in the Analects Confucius holds the essence of human virtue to be a kind of magic power and this magic can be explained in terms of J. L. Austin’s analysis of the “performative utterance.” This paper attempts to explicate what Fingarette’s claims concerning magic and the “performative” amount to. I will argue that even though there is something to the underlying spirit of Fingarette’s project, he either (...)
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  21.  8
    Alpesh Maisuria (2011). Critical Race Theory Matters: Education and Ideology. By M. Zamudio, C. Russell, M. A. Rios and J. L. Bridgeman. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (3):348-350.
    (2011). Critical Race Theory Matters: Education and Ideology. By M. Zamudio, C. Russell, M. A. Rios and J. L. Bridgeman. British Journal of Educational Studies: Vol. 59, Research capacity building, pp. 348-350.
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  22.  7
    Aydan Turanl (2008). On Juren Habermas's Misinterpretation of J.L. Austin. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:237-243.
    Jürgen Habermas derives his political theory and discourse ethics from a view of language based upon “universal pragmatics.” Universal pragmatics is identified by Habermas to reveal universal conditions of possible understanding with the belief that not only syntactic and semantic characteristics of language, but also pragmatic characteristics of utterances related to speech should be reconstructed to build an undistorted communication. Nevertheless, the communicative competence, which is supposed to be related to pragmatics of language, is derived from the misinterpretation of J. (...)
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  23.  22
    Bryan Magee (1999). A Note on J. L. Austin and the Drama. Philosophy 74 (1):119-121.
    A play's text is nearly all talk, and in the performance of a play the physical activity is sparse and exceedingly limited. Used of a play, the term ‘action’ does not mean what it normally means. Its true meaning is illuminated by reference to J. L. Austin and his doctrine of speech-acts. Dramatic action is, for the most part, speech-action. And a skilful manipulation of speech-acts enables the gifted dramatist not only to tell a story but to communicate what is (...)
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  24.  5
    Sonia Reverter Bañón (1994). J. L. Austin: un análisis de la percepción desde la fenomenología lingüística. Diálogo Filosófico 29:233-238.
    La explicación, defensa y justificación de la teoría de los datos sensibles ha absorbido grandes energías dentro de la filosofía de la percepción. Con todo se nos presenta hoy en día como una teoría tan derruida como el edificio epistemológico al cual pretendía sustentar: el fundamentalismo. Muchas, y desde muy diferentes flancos, han sido las críticas que han causado su caída. Precisamente aquí se expone la que considero una de las más agudas: la que realiza J. L. Austin desde la (...)
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  25.  2
    J. L. H. Thomas (1990). ‘Why Did It Happen to Me?’: J. L. H. THOMAS. Religious Studies 26 (3):323-334.
    There are doubtless many with personal experience of suffering, or of comforting others in distress, who would agree with Milton thus far that philosophic argument is powerless to satisfy those who in their anguish ask the question ‘Why did it happen to me?’ Yet to think so is to underestimate both the necessity and the power of reason: clarity of mind and the disposition to argue are commonly enhanced rather than diminished by suffering; and if reason is an essential part (...)
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  26.  1
    K. T. Fann (2013). Symposium on J. L. Austin. Routledge.
    J. L. Austin exercised in Post-war Oxford an intellectual authority similar to that of Wittgenstein in Cambridge. Although he completed no books of his own and published only seven papers, Austin became through lectures and talks one of the acknowledged leaders in what is called ‘Oxford philosophy’ or ‘ordinary language philosophy’. Few would dispute that among analytic philosophers Austin stands out as a great and original philosophical genius. Three volumes of his writing, published after his death, have become classics in (...)
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  27. J. L. Gorman (1987). Philosophical Confidence: J. L. Gorman. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:71-79.
    Analytical philosophers, if they are true to their training, never forget the first lesson of analytical philosophy: philosophers have no moral authority. In so far as analytical philosophers believe this, they find it easy to live with. For them even to assert, let alone successfully lay claim to, moral authority would require, first, hard work of some non-analytical and probably mistaken kind and, secondly, personality traits of leadership or confidence or even charisma, which philosophers may accidentally have but which they (...)
     
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  28.  10
    Martin Gustafsson & Richard Sørli (eds.) (2011). The Philosophy of J. L. Austin. Oxford University Press.
    These new essays on J. L. Austin's philosophy constitute the first major study of his thought in decades.
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  29.  17
    Ted Honderich (ed.) (1985). Morality and Objectivity: A Tribute to J.L. Mackie. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    The late J. L. Mackie and his work were a focus for much of the best philosophical thinking in the Oxford tradition. His moral thought centres on that most fundamental issue in moral philosophy – the issue of whether our moral judgements are in some way objective. The contributors to this volume, first published in 1985, are among the most distinguished figures in moral philosophy, and their essays in tribute to John Mackie present views at the forefront of the subject. (...)
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  30. Ted Honderich (ed.) (2013). Morality and Objectivity : A Tribute to J. L. Mackie. Routledge.
    The late J. L. Mackie and his work were a focus for much of the best philosophical thinking in the Oxford tradition. His moral thought centres on that most fundamental issue in moral philosophy – the issue of whether our moral judgements are in some way objective. The contributors to this volume, first published in 1985, are among the most distinguished figures in moral philosophy, and their essays in tribute to John Mackie present views at the forefront of the subject. (...)
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  31. Ted Honderich (ed.) (2012). Morality and Objectivity : A Tribute to J. L. Mackie. Routledge.
    The late J. L. Mackie and his work were a focus for much of the best philosophical thinking in the Oxford tradition. His moral thought centres on that most fundamental issue in moral philosophy – the issue of whether our moral judgements are in some way objective. The contributors to this volume, first published in 1985, are among the most distinguished figures in moral philosophy, and their essays in tribute to John Mackie present views at the forefront of the subject. (...)
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  32.  32
    David Johnston (1991). J. L. Austin on Truth and Meaning. Dissertation, Mcgill University (Canada)
    The thesis presents a development of J. L. Austin's analysis of truth and its accompanying analysis of sentence structure. This involves a discussion and refinement of Austin's notions of the demonstrative and descriptive conventions of language and of the demonstrative and descriptive devices of sentences. The main point of the thesis is that ordinary language must be treated as an historical phenomenon: one that has evolved its more complex features through a long series of variations upon a small number of (...)
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  33.  21
    Jarava Lal Mehta (1992). J.L. Mehta on Heidegger, Hermeneutics, and Indian Tradition. E.J. Brill.
    This book presents a selection of essays by the Indian philosopher J.L. Mehta on the topics of hermeneutics and phenomenology containing many original ...
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  34. Raimondo Panikkar & William Halbfass (1992). J.L. Mehta on Heidegger, Hermeneutics and Indian Tradition. Brill.
    In these essays, J.L. Mehta, Indian philosopher in whose life and work East and West met profoundly, reflects on the origins and potency of modern hermeneutics and phenomenology, and applies the principles of interpretation to Hindu traditions. These farseeing essays show a hopeful way for non-Western cultures to gain insight into the basic presuppositions of the Western world, and to reclaim their own origins and ways of thinking, and to participate in an emerging planetary thinking.
     
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  35. J. L. Schellenberg (2010). How to Be an Atheist and a Sceptic Too: Response to McCreary: J. L. SCHELLENBERG. Religious Studies 46 (2):227-232.
    Mark McCreary has argued that I cannot consistently advance both the hiddenness argument and certain arguments for religious scepticism found in my book The Wisdom to Doubt . This reaction was expected, and in WD I explained its shortsightedness in that context. First, I noted how in Part III of WD , where theism is addressed, my principal aim is not to prove atheism but to show theists that they are not immune from the scepticism defended in Parts I and (...)
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  36. J. L. H. Thomas (1991). Against the Fantasts: J. L. H. Thomas. Philosophy 66 (257):349-367.
    Amongst Kant's lesser known early writings is a short treatise with the curious title Dreams of a Spirit-Seer Explained by Dreams of Metaphysics , in which, with considerable acumen and brilliance, and not a little irony, Kant exposes the empty pretensions of his contemporary, the Swedish visionary and Biblical exegete, Emanuel Swedenborg, to have access to a spirit world, denied other mortals. Despite his efforts, it must be feared, however, that Kant did not, alas, succeed in laying the spirit of (...)
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  37. Daniel Yeager (2005). J.L. Austin and the Law: Exculpation and the Explication of Responsibility. Bucknell University Press.
    The author confronts the idea of responsibility by mapping the work of J. L. Austin onto the criminal law. Doing so entails considering the extent to which the language of criminal law can be reconciled with ordinary language, a project that entails considering whether the language of criminal law is ordinary language.
     
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  38. Emmanuel Falque (2005). Larvatus Pro Deo: Phénoménologie Et Théologie Chez J.-L. Marion. Gregorianum 86 (1):45-62.
    «Au moment de monter sur ce théâtre du monde [...], j'avance masqué». Cette déclaration de Descartes dans le Préambule des Cogitationes Privatae n'est pas que l'aveu d'un jeune philosophe à l'aube du XVIIe siècle, mais marque une stratégie maintenant séculaire selon laquelle philosophie et théologie devraient être séparées tant dans leurs disciplines que dans leur corpus. Jean-Luc Marion, témoin exemplaire de cette dichotomie, use ainsi de la démarche dionysienne de l'homme caché devant Dieu comme justification théologique de l'avance masquée du (...)
     
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  39.  24
    Giuseppe Ferraro (2013). A Criticism of M. Siderits and J. L. Garfield's 'Semantic Interpretation' of Nāgārjuna's Theory of Two Truths. Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (2):195-219.
    This paper proposes a critical analysis of that interpretation of the Nāgārjunian doctrine of the two truths as summarized—by both Mark Siderits and Jay L. Garfield—in the formula: “the ultimate truth is that there is no ultimate truth”. This ‘semantic reading’ of Nāgārjuna’s theory, despite its importance as a criticism of the ‘metaphysical interpretations’, would in itself be defective and improbable. Indeed, firstly, semantic interpretation presents a formal defect: it fails to clearly and explicitly express that which it contains logically; (...)
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  40.  19
    J. L. Ackrill (1985). L. Delatte, C. Rutten, S. Govaerts, J. Denooz: Aristoteles, Metaphysica, Index verborum, Listes de fréquence. (Alpha–Omega, Reihe A, 42.) Pp. xiii + 521. Hildesheim: Olms–Weidmann, 1984. DM. 118. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (02):386-.
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  41.  11
    J. L. Stocks (1930). The Oxford Aristotle The Works of Aristotle. Translated Into English Under the Editorship of W. D. Ross, M.A., Hon. LL.D. (Edin.), Fellow of Oriel College, Fellow Ofthe British Academy. Vol. I., Categoriae and De Interpretatione, by L M. Edghill; Analytica Priora, by A. J. Jenkinson; Analytica Posteriora, by G. R.G. Mure; Topica and De Sophisticis Elenchis, by W.A. Pickard-Cambridge. Vol. VII., Problemata, by E. S. Forster. Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, 1927, 1928. 15s. Net Each. Aristotle: Selections. Edited by W. D. Ross, Deputy Professor of Moral Philosophy, and Fellow of Oriel College, University of Oxford. Pp.Xxv + 348. Humphrey Milford: Oxford University Press, 1927. 4s.6d.Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):20-21.
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  42.  6
    Paul L. Simard Smith (2015). Nikolaj J. L. L. Pedersen and Cory D. Wright, Eds., Truth and Pluralism: Current Debates. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (4):220-224.
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  43.  11
    Robert J. Fogelin (1982). Hume's Moral Theory by J. L. Mackie. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 79 (4):210-213.
  44.  8
    R. J. B. (1970). Symposium on J. L. Austin. Review of Metaphysics 23 (4):756-756.
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  45.  7
    George J. Stack (1983). Aristotle the Philosopher. By J. L. Ackrill. Modern Schoolman 61 (1):53-54.
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  46.  12
    T. L. Heath (1899). Heiberg's Ptolemy Claudii Ptolemaei Opera Quae Exstant Omnia. Volumen I. Syntaxis Mathematica. Edidit J. L. Heiberg, Professor Hauniensis. Pars I. Libros I.–VI. Continens. Lipsiae, in Aedibus B. G. Teubneri. MDCCCLXXXXVIII. Pp. Vi. + 546. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 13 (04):226-227.
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  47.  42
    J. O. Urmson (1965). J. L. Austin. Journal of Philosophy 62 (19):499-508.
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  48.  6
    J. B. C. & Joe Friggieri (1993). Actions and Speech Actions in the Philosophy of J. L. Austin. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (170):122.
  49.  6
    David J. Heffner (1969). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. By J. L. Goodall. Modern Schoolman 46 (2):175-175.
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  50.  3
    J. R. Hume (2015). Roman Pollution. J.L. Lennon Pollution and Religion in Ancient Rome. Pp. X + 229. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Cased, £60, Us$99. Isbn: 978-1-107-03790-8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (1):208-210.
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