81 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Jamie Lennox
  1. Gregory Salmieri, David Bronstein, David Charles & James G. Lennox (forthcoming). Episteme, Demonstration, and Explanation: A Fresh Look at Aristotle's Posterior Analytics. [REVIEW] Metascience:1-35.
  2. Allan Gotthelf & James G. Lennox (eds.) (2014). Metaethics, Egoism, and Virtue: Studies in Ayn Rand's Normative Theory. University of Pittsburgh Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. James G. Lennox (2014). Aristotle on the Emergence of Material Complexity: Meteorology IV and Aristotle’s Biology. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (2):272-305.
    In this article I defend an account of Meteorology IV as providing a material-level causal account of the emergence of uniform materials with a wide range of dispositional properties not found at the level of the four elements—the emergence of material complexity. I then demonstrate that this causal account is used in the Generation of Animals and Parts of Animals as part of the explanation of the generation of the uniform parts (tissues) and of their role in providing nonuniform parts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Allan Gotthelf & James G. Lennox (eds.) (2013). Concepts and Their Role in Knowledge: Reflections on Objectivist Epistemology. University of Pittsburgh Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Fred Evans, Allan Gotthelf, James G. Lennox, Jesus Ilundain-Agurruza, Michael W. Austin, Timothy O'Connor, Constantine Sandis, Graham Oppy, Michael Scott & Roland Pierik (2011). Chalmers, David J. The Character of Consciousness, Oxford University Press, 2010, 624 Pp. Cliteur, Paul. The Secular Outlook: In Defense of Moral and Political Secularism, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, 328 Pp. Cochran, Molly. The Cambridge Companion to Dewey, Cambridge Uni. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 42 (3):0026-1068.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. James G. Lennox (2011). Aristotle on Norms of Inquiry. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):23-46.
    Where does Aristotle stand in the debate between rationalism and empiricism? The locus classicus on this question, Posterior Analytics II. 19, seems clearly empiricist. Yet many commentators have resisted this conclusion. Here, I review their arguments and conclude that they rest in part on expectations for this text that go unfulfilled. I argue that this is because his views about norms of empirical inquiry are in the rich methodological passages in his scientific treatises. In support of this claim, I explore (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. J. Lennox (2010). La Fonction Biologique: Phylogénie d'Un Concept. In Jean Gayon & Armand de Ricqlès (eds.), Les Fonctions: Des Organismes aux Artefacts. Presses Universitaires de France 17--42.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. James Lennox (2010). Aristotle on Life. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 101:420-421.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. James Lennox (2010). Bios and Explanatory Unity in Aristotle's Biology. In David Charles (ed.), Definition in Greek Philosophy. OUP Oxford
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. James G. Lennox (2010). Aristotle's Natural Science: The Many and the One. Apeiron 43 (2-3):1-24.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. James G. Lennox (2010). The Darwin/Gray Correspondence 1857–1869: An Intelligent Discussion About Chance and Design. Perspectives on Science 18 (4):456-479.
    This essay outlines one aspect of a larger collaboration with John Beatty and Alan Love.2 The project’s focus is philosophical, but for reasons that will become clear momentarily, the method of approach is historical. All three of us share the conviction that philosophical issues concerning the foundations of the sciences are often illuminated by investigating their history. It is my hope that this paper both provides support for that thesis, and illustrates it. The focal philosophical issue can be stated in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. James G. Lennox & Robert Bolton (eds.) (2010). Being, Nature, and Life in Aristotle: Essays in Honor of Allan Gotthelf. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Teleology, Platonic and Aristotelian David Sedley; 2. Biology and metaphysics in Aristotle Robert Bolton; 3. The unity and purpose of On the Parts of Animals I James G. Lennox; 4. An Aristotelian puzzle about definition: Metaphysics Z.12 Alan Code; 5. Unity of definition in Metaphysics H.6 and Z.12 Mary Louise Gill; 6. Definition in Aristotle's Posterior Analytics Pierre Pellegrin; 7. Male and female in Aristotle's Generation of Animals Aryeh Kosman; 8. Metaphysics Θ. 7 and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. James G. Lennox (2009). De Caelo 2.2 and Its Debt to De Incessu Animalium. In A. C. Bowen & C. Wildberg (eds.), New Perspectives on Aristotle’s de Caelo. Brill 1--187.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. James G. Lennox (2009). Darwin, Philosopher. Metascience 18 (1):121-124.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. J. Lennox (2008). Review: David Bostock: Space, Time, Matter, and Form: Essays on Aristotle's Physics. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):170-174.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. J. Lennox (2008). As If We Were Investigating Snubness”: Aristotle on the Prospects for a Single Science of Nature,'. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 35:149-186.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. James Lennox, Aristotle's Biology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Aristotle is properly recognized as the originator of the scientific study of life. This is true despite the fact that many earlier Greek natural philosophers occasionally speculated on the origins of living things and much of the Hippocratic medical corpus, which was written before or during Aristotle's lifetime, displays a serious interest in human anatomy, physiology and pathology. Even Plato has Timaeus devote a considerable part of his speech to the human body and its functions (and malfunctions). Nevertheless, before Aristotle, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. James Lennox, Darwinism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Darwinism designates a distinctive form of evolutionary explanation for the history and diversity of life on earth. Its original formulation is provided in the first edition of On the Origin of Species in 1859. This entry first formulates ‘Darwin's Darwinism’ in terms of five philosophically distinctive themes: (i) probability and chance, (ii) the nature, power and scope of selection, (iii) adaptation and teleology, (iv) nominalism vs. essentialism about species and (v) the tempo and mode of evolutionary change. Both Darwin and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. James G. Lennox (2008). Galen. Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):448 - 452.
  20. James G. Lennox (2006). Johansen (T.K.) Plato's Natural Philosophy. A Study of the Timaeus–Critias. Pp. Vi + 218, Ill. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Cased, £45, US$75. ISBN: 0-521-79067-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):57-.
  21. James G. Lennox (2006). The Comparative Study of Animal Development : From Aristotle to William Harvey's Aristotelianism. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. James G. Lennox (2006). The Comparative Study of Animal Development: William Harvey's Aristotelianism.”. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 21--46.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. James G. Lennox (2005). Darwin's Methodological Evolution. Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):85 - 99.
    A necessary condition for having a revolution named after you is that you are an innovator in your field. I argue that if Charles Darwin meets this condition, it is as a philosopher and methodologist. In 1991, I made the case for Darwin's innovative use of "thought experiment" in the "Origin." Here I place this innovative practice in the context of Darwin's methodological commitments, trace its origins back into Darwin's notebooks, and pursue Darwin's suggestion that it owes its inspiration to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. James G. Lennox (2005). Getting a Science Going: Aristotle on Entry Level Kinds'. In Gereon Wolters & Martin Carrier (eds.), Homo Sapiens Und Homo Faber. De Gruyter 87.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. James Lennox (2003). Keith M. Parsons, Drawing Out Leviathan: Dinosaurs and the Science Wars. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (1):109-111.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. James G. Lennox (2003). Aristotle: On the Parts of Animals. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):607-609.
    Aristotle is without question the founder of the science of biology. In his treatise On the Parts of Animals, he develops his systematic principles for biological investigation, and explanation, and applies those principles to explain why the different animal kinds have the different parts that they do. It is one of the greatest achievements in the history of science. This new translation from the Greek aims to reflect the subtlety and detail of Aristotle's reasoning. The commentary provides help in understanding (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Paul Diane, James Lennox & Jim Tabery, Session 1: Eugenics Narrative and Reproductive Engineering.
    Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Workshop in History and Philosophy of Biology, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, March 23-24 2001 Session 1: Eugenics Narrative and Reproductive Engineering.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. James Lennox, Comments on Paul.
    A critique of portions of Prof. Diane Paul's paper presented at the Pittsburgh 2002 History and Philosophy of Biology workshop. Lennox poses questions about Paul's claims regarding the narratives linking genetic engineering to eugenics, insisting that the situation is more complex than suggested.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. James Lennox (2002). Life's Form: Late Aristotelian Conceptions Of The Soul. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:104-105.
    Life's Form is that rarest of books: an important contribution to advanced scholarship on its subject that is thoroughly accessible to nonspecialists. It immerses its readers in the world of the sixteenth‐ to seventeenth‐century scientia de anima, within which, and out of which, emerges Descartes's decidedly non‐Aristotelian conception of the body‐soul relation that has haunted us ever since. We are treated to lengthy, elegant translations of the Latin texts of the leading Jesuit philosophers of the period, principally Toletus, Sudrez, Fonseca, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. James G. Lennox (2002). Che bene è un adattamento? Iride 15 (3):521-538.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. James G. Lennox (2001). Aristotle on the Unity and Disunity of Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (2):133 – 144.
  32. James G. Lennox (2001). Aristotle's Philosophy of Biology: Studies in the Origins of Life Science. Cambridge University Press.
    In addition to being one of the world's most influential philosophers, Aristotle can also be credited with the creation of both the science of biology and the philosophy of biology. He was the first thinker to treat the investigations of the living world as a distinct inquiry with its own special concepts and principles. This book focuses on a seminal event in the history of biology - Aristotle's delineation of a special branch of theoretical knowledge devoted to the systematic investigation (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. James G. Lennox, History and Philosophy of Science: A Phylogenetic Approach.
    Kuhn closed the Introduction to The Structure of Scientific Revolutions with what was clearly intended as a rhetorical question: How could history of science fail to be a source of phenomena to which theories about knowledge may legitimately be asked to apply? (Kuhn 1970, 9) This paper argues that there is a more fruitful way of conceiving the relationship between a historical and philosophical study of science, which is dubbed the 'phylogenetic' approach. I sketch an example of this approach, and (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. James Lennox (1999). The Place of Mankind in Aristotle’s Zoology. Philosophical Topics 27 (1):1-16.
    Historians of psychology often treat Aristotle’s De Anima as the first scientific treatment of their subject; and historians of biology do likewise with his zoological treatises. How are the investigations recorded in works such as the Parts of Animals and History of Animals connected to those in the De Anima? More specifically, given Aristotle’s views about man’s special and distinctive cognitive capacities, what does he think about man as an object of a distinctively zoological investigation? In the following pages, this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. James G. Lennox (1999). In Memoriam: Carl G. (Peter) Hempel 1905--1997. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (4):477-480.
  36. James Lennox (1997). Concepts of Health and Disease: Comments on Chapter 5 of Engelhardt's "The Foundations of Bioethics," 2nd Edition. Reason Papers 22:75-84.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. James G. Lennox (1997). Dennett, Daniel C. Darwin's Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life. Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):652-654.
  38. James G. Lennox (1995). Colloquium 6. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):217-240.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. James G. Lennox (1995). Health as an Objective Value. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (5):499-511.
    Variants on two approaches to the concept of health have dominated the philosophy of medicine, here referred to as ‘reductionist’ and ‘relativis’. These two approaches share the basic assumption that the concept of health cannot be both based on an empirical biological foundation and be evaluative, and thus adopt either the view that it is ‘objective’ or evaluative. It is here argued that there are a subset of value concepts that are formed in recognition of certain fundamental facts about living (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Gereon Wolters & James G. Lennox (1995). Concepts, Theories, and Rationality in the Biological Sciences. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Gereon Wolters, James G. Lennox & Peter Mclaughlin (1995). Concepts, Theories, and Rationality in the Biological Sciences the Second Pittsburgh-Konstanz Colloquium in the Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, October 1-4, 1993. [REVIEW]
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Mary Louise Gill & James G. Lennox (1994). Self-Motion From Aristotle to Newton. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. J. Lennox (1994). Aristotle's Biology: Plain, but Not Simple. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 25 (5):817-823.
    The occasion for this critical review is the publication of a second, revised edition of David M Balme's translation, with introduction and notes, of Aristotle's "De Partimus Animalium I" and "De Generatione Animalium I" in the Clarendon Aristotle series. The second edition includes an appendix by Allan Gotthelf with a selective bibliography and a guide to the philosophical literature occasioned by Balme's notes. This critical review discusses Balme's unique style of translation and commentary, analyzing in detail a number of key (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. James Lennox (1994). Aristotle's de partibus animalium I and de generatione animalium I. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):817-823.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. James Lennox (1994). Aristotle's de Partibus Animalium I and de Generatione Animalium I: DM Balme,(with Passages From Book II. 1–3), Revised Edition,(Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), 192 Pp. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):817-823.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. James Lennox (1994). Essay Review. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 25 (5):817-823.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. James G. Lennox (1994). Book Review:The Meaning of Evolution: The Morphological Construction and Ideological Reconstruction of Darwin's Theory Robert J. Richards. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 61 (4):673-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. James G. Lennox (1994). Aristotelian Problems. Ancient Philosophy 14 (Special Issue):53-77.
  49. James G. Lennox (1994). Galen: On the Therapeutic Method Books I and II. Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):448-452.
  50. James G. Lennox (1994). Putting Philosophy of Science to the Test: The Case of Aristotle's Biology. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:239 - 247.
    During the Middle Ages and Rennaissance, it was commonly believed that Aristotle's biological studies reflected his theory of demonstrative science quite well. By contrast, most commentators in the twentieth century have taken it that this is not the case. This is largely the result of preconceptions about what a natural science modelled after the proposals of Aristotle's Posterior Analytics would look like. I argue that these modern preconceptions are incorrect, and that, while the Analytics leaves a variety of issues unanswered (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 81