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  1. J. M. Bernstein & Monochromes Readymades (forthcoming). Subjects/Titles. Diacritics.
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  2. J. M. Bernstein (2012). Movement! Action! Belief? Angelaki 17 (4):77 - 93.
    Deleuze's philosophy of cinema departs from the standard conception of modernist aesthetics that sees art withdrawing from representation in order to reflect upon the specificity of its medium. While ambitious and influential, Deleuze's attempt fails. Overdetermined by its own metaphysics, it forsakes the real importance of the movies. It is unable to explain how they function and why they matter. This essay pursues three lines of criticism: Deleuze cannot account for the aesthetic specificity of cinema because he deposes the primacy (...)
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  3. J. M. Bernstein (2012). Political Modernism : The New, Revolution, and Civil Disobedience in Arendt and Adorno. In Lars Rensmann & Samir Gandesha (eds.), Arendt and Adorno: Political and Philosophical Investigations. Stanford University Press.
  4. J. M. Bernstein (2011). Is Ethical Naturalism Possible? From Life to Recognition. Constellations 18 (1):8-20.
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  5. J. M. Bernstein (2011). Trust: On the Real but Almost Always Unnoticed, Ever-Changing Foundation of Ethical Life. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):395-416.
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  6. Magdalena Zolkos, J. M. Bernstein, Roy Ben-Shai, Thomas Brudholm, Arne Grøn, Dennis B. Klein, Kitty J. Millet, Joseph Rosen, Philipa Rothfield, Melanie Steiner Sherwood, Wolfgang Treitler, Aleksandra Ubertowska, Michael Ure, Anna Yeatman & Markus Zisselsberger (2011). On Jean Améry: Philosophy of Catastrophe. Lexington Books.
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  7. J. M. Bernstein (2010). Promising and Civil Disobedience : Arendt's Political Modernism. In Roger Berkowitz, Jeffrey Katz & Thomas Keenan (eds.), Thinking in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt on Ethics and Politics. Fordham University Press.
  8. J. M. Bernstein (2010). Axel Honneth, The Pathologies of Individual Freedom: Hegel's Social Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).
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  9. J. M. Bernstein (2010). Without Sovereignty or Miracles: Reply to Birmingham. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (1):21-31.
    Let me begin with a wisp of political history. According to the Earl of Clarendon, in 1639 the king’s “three kingdoms [were] flourishing in entire peace and universal plenty.”1 Yet by 1642 civil war had broken out, and in 1649 the king was beheaded. What had caused this breakdown of civil and political order, a breakdown that was not localized in England but, in fact, rife throughout Europe—1648 like 1848 was a year of revolutions? Clarendon himself is less than acute (...)
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  10. J. M. Bernstein (2009). Roundtable on Michael Thompson's Life and Action-to Be is to Live, to Be is to Be Recognized. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 30 (2):357.
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  11. J. M. Bernstein (2009). Tragedy. In Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press. 71--94.
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  12. J. M. Bernstein (2009). To Be Is to Live, To Be Is to Be Recognized. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 30 (2):357-390.
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  13. J. M. Bernstein (2008). Human Rights, Unicorns, Etc. Research in Phenomenology 38 (2):303-313.
  14. J. M. Bernstein (2007). Freedom From Nature? Post-Hegelian Reflections on the End(s) of Art. In Stephen Houlgate (ed.), Hegel and the Arts. Northwestern University Press.
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  15. J. M. Bernstein (2007). Promising and Civil Disobedience (Arendt's Political Modernism). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (1):47-60.
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  16. J. M. Bernstein (2006). Review of Martin Jay, Songs of Experience: Modern American and European Variations on a Universal Theme. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (7).
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  17. J. M. Bernstein (2005). Suffering Injustice: Misrecognition as Moral Injury in Critical Theory. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (3):303 – 324.
    It is the persistence of social suffering in a world in which it could be eliminated that for Adorno is the source of the need for critical reflection, for philosophy. Philosophy continues and gains its cultural place because an as yet unbridgeable abyss separates the social potential for the relief of unnecessary human suffering and its emphatic continuance. Philosophy now is the culturally bound repository for the systematic acknowledgement and articulation of the meaning of the expanse of human suffering within (...)
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  18. J. M. Bernstein (2004). Mimetic Rationality and Material Inference : Adorno and Brandom. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 1:7-23.
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  19. J. M. Bernstein (2004). Readymades, Monochromes, Etc.: Nominalism and the Paradox of Modernism. Diacritics 32 (1):83-100.
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  20. J. M. Bernstein (2004). Review of Michael Kelly, Iconoclasm and Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (3).
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  21. J. M. Bernstein (2003). 'Aesthetics, Modernism, Literature: Cavell's Transformations of Philosophy,”. In Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.), Stanley Cavell. Cambridge University Press. 107--42.
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  22. J. M. Bernstein (ed.) (2003). Classic and Romantic German Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume brings together major works by German thinkers, writing just prior to and after Kant, who were enormously influential in this crucial period of aesthetics. These texts include the first translation into English of Schiller's Kallias Letters and Moritz's On the Artistic Imitation of the Beautiful, together with new translations of some of Hölderlin's most important theoretical writings and works by Hamann, Lessing, Novalis and Schlegel. In a philosophical introduction J. M. Bernstein traces the development of aesthetics from its (...)
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  23. J. M. Bernstein (2002). Re-Enchanting Nature. In Nicholas H. Smith (ed.), Reading Mcdowell. On Mind and World. Routledge. 277-299.
    [This is a revised and expanded version of an article of the same name published in the Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology, October 2000: 31(3), 277–299.].
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  24. J. M. Bernstein (2001). Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Theodor W. Adorno is best known for his contributions to aesthetics and social theory. Critics have always complained about the lack of a practical, political or ethical dimension to Adorno's philosophy. In this highly original contribution to the literature on Adorno, J. M. Bernstein offers the first attempt in any language to provide an account of the ethical theory latent in Adorno's writings. Bernstein relates Adorno's ethics to major trends in contemporary moral philosophy. He analyses the full range of Adorno's (...)
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  25. J. M. Bernstein (2001). Constitutional Patriotism and the Problem of Violence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (S1):97-109.
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  26. J. M. Bernstein (2001). Marx's Attempt to Leave Philosophy. Philosophical Review 110 (2):275-278.
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  27. J. M. Bernstein (2000). Hegel's Ladder: The Ethical Presuppositions of Absolute Knowing. Dialogue 39 (04):803-.
  28. J. M. Bernstein (2000). Judging Life: From Beauty to Experience. From Kant to Chaim Soutine. Constellations 7 (2):157-177.
  29. J. M. Bernstein (1999). Benjamin's Speculative Cultural History. Theory, Culture and Society 16 (3):141-150.
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  30. J. M. Bernstein (1999). Idealism as Modernism: Hegelian Variations Robert B. Pippin Modern European Philosophy New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997, Xiii + 466 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):674-.
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  31. J. M. Bernstein (1999). Idealism as Modernism. Dialogue 38 (3):674-676.
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  32. J. M. Bernstein (1999). Walter Benjamin's Passages. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (4):118-119.
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  33. J. M. Bernstein (1998). Hegel's Hermeneutics. Philosophical Review 107 (1):158-160.
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  34. J. M. Bernstein (1997). On Philosophy and Film, Edited by Cynthia A. Freeland and Thomas E. Wartenberg. European Journal of Philosophy 5:83-87.
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  35. J. M. Bernstein (1996). Confession and Forgiveness: Hegel's Poetics of Action. In Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.), Beyond Representation: Philosophy and Poetic Imagination. Cambridge University Press. 34--65.
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  36. J. M. Bernstein (1995). Recovering Ethical Life: Jürgen Habermas and the Future of Critical Theory. Routledge.
    Jurgen Habermas' construction of a critical social theory of society grounded in communicative reason is one of the very few real philosophical inventions of recent times that demands and repays extended engagement. In this elaborate and sympathetic study which places Habermas' project in the context of critical theory as a whole past and future, J. M. Bernstein argues that despite its undoubted achievements, it contributes to the very problems of ethical dislocation and meaninglessness it aims to diagnose and remedy. Bernstein (...)
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  37. J. M. Bernstein (1995). The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Philosophical Books 36 (4):258-260.
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  38. L. Allison, J. Annas, Robert L. Arrington, Hans-Johann Glock, J. M. Bernstein & D. Beyleveld (1992). Appearance in This List Does Not Preclude a Future Review of the Book. Where They Are Known Prices Are Either Given in $ US or in£ UK. Mind 101.
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  39. J. M. Bernstein (1992). After the Demise of the Tradition: Rorty, Critical Theory, and the Fate of Philosophy. Philosophical Books 33 (3):150-152.
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  40. J. M. Bernstein (1992). De-Divinization and the Vindication of Everyday Life: Reply to Rorty. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 54 (4):668 - 692.
    This essay originated as a reply to Richard Rorty's ”Habermas, Derrida, and the Functions of Philosophy“. In it, I contest Rorty's deployment of the categories of private selfcreation and the collective political enterprise of increasing freedom, first developed in Contingency, Irony and Solidarity, to demonstrate that the philosophical projects of Habermas and Derrida are complementary rather than antagonistic. The focus of my critique is two-fold: firstly, I contend that so-called critiques of metaphysics are always simutaneously engaging with some form of (...)
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  41. J. M. Bernstein (1992). The Fate of Art: Aesthetic Alienation From Kant to Derrida and Adorno. Penn State University Press.
     
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  42. J. M. Bernstein (1991). 8 Autonomy and Solitude. In Keith Ansell-Pearson (ed.), Nietzsche and Modern German Thought. Routledge. 192.
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  43. J. M. Bernstein (1990). Contemporary French Philosophy. Philosophical Books 31 (2):96-98.
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  44. J. M. Bernstein (1987). Marx and Philosophy: Three Studies. Philosophical Books 28 (2):81-83.
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  45. J. M. Bernstein (1987). The Politics of Fulfilment and Transfiguration'. Radical Philosophy 47.
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  46. J. M. Bernstein (1986). Beauty and Truth: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics. Philosophical Books 27 (2):90-91.
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