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John O'Neill [121]J. O'Neill [28]J. C. O'neill [6]Joseph E. O'Neill [3]
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Profile: John O'Neill
  1. John O'Neill (1995). 'I Gotta Use Words When I Talk to You' : A Response to Death and Furniture. History of the Human Sciences 8 (4):99-106.
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  2. John O'neill (1998). Environmental Values.
     
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  3.  54
    John O'Neill (2002). The Rhetoric of Deliberation: Some Problems in Kantian Theories of Deliberative Democracy. Res Publica 8 (3):249-268.
    Deliberative or discursive models of democracy have recently enjoyed a revival in both political theory and policy practice. Against the picture of democracy as a procedure for aggregating and effectively meeting the given preference of individuals, deliberative theory offers a model of democracy as a forum through which judgements and preferences are formed and altered through reasoned dialogue between free and equal citizens. Much in the recent revival of deliberative democracy, especially that which comes through Habermas and Rawls, has Kantian (...)
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  4.  5
    John O'neill (2008). Happiness and the Good Life. Environmental Values 17 (2):125 - 144.
    Holland argues that environmental deliberation should return to classical questions about the nature of the good life, understood as the worthwhile life. Holland's proposal contrasts with the revived hedonist conception of the good life which has been influential on environmentalism. The concept of the worthwhile life needs to be carefully distinguished from those of the happy life and the dutiful life. Holland's account of the worthwhile life captures the narrative dimension of human well-being which is revealed but inadequately addressed by (...)
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  5. John O'Neill (1989). Two Problems of Induction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (1):121-125.
    In this paper I distinguish two problems of induction: a problem of the uniformity of nature and a problem of the variety of nature. I argue that the traditional problem of induction that Popper poses—the problem of uniformity—is not that which is relevant to science. The problem relevant to science is that of the variety of nature. *I would like to thank Bob Hale, Russell Keat and the Journal's referee for their comments on earlier drafts of this paper.
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  6. John O'Neill (1993). Ecology, Policy and Politics: Human Well-Being and the Natural World. Routledge.
    Revealing flaws in both 'green' and market-based approaches to environmental policy, O'Neill develops an Aristotolian account of well-being. He examines the implications for wider issues involving markets, civil society an.
     
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  7.  16
    John O'Neill & Thomas Uebel (2008). Logical Empiricism as Critical Theory? The Debate Continues. Analyse & Kritik 30 (2):379-398.
    Is logical empiricism incompatible with a critical social science? The longstanding assumption that it is incompatible has been prominent in recent debates about welfare economics. Sen’s development of a critical and descriptively rich welfare eco nomics is taken by writers such as Putnam, Walsh and Sen to involve the excising of the influence of logical empiricism on neo-classical economics. However, this view stands in contrast to the descriptively rich contributions to political economy of members of the left Vienna Circle, such (...)
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  8.  16
    Joseph E. O'Neill (1976). The Fiftieth Anniversary of THOUGHT. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):5-6.
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  9.  1
    John O'neill (2000). The Market. Ethics, Knowledge and Politics. Environmental Values 9 (1):111-113.
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  10.  70
    John O'Neill (2002). Lewis and the Flawed Nihilist. Analysis 62 (275):223-225.
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  11.  66
    John O'Neill (1986). The Specular Body: Merleau-Ponty and Lacan on Infant Self and Other. Synthese 66 (2):201 - 217.
  12.  15
    Joseph E. O'Neill (1966). The Fortieth Anniversary of Thought. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):5-7.
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  13.  14
    John O'Neill (1981). 6. Vico on the Natural Workings of the Mind. Philosophical Topics 12 (Supplement):117-125.
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  14.  15
    Joseph E. O'Neill (1956). The Metaphorical Mode: Image, Metaphor, Symbol. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):79-113.
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  15.  2
    J. O'Neill, & C. Spash, Conceptions of Value in Environmental Decision-Making.
    Environmental problems have an ethical dimension. They are not just about the efficient use of resources. Justice in the distribution of environmental goods and burdens, fairness in the processes of environmental decision-making, the moral claims of future generations and non-humans, these and other ethical values inform the responses of citizens to environmental problems. How can these concerns enter into good policy-making processes?Two expert-based approaches are commonly advocated for incorporating ethical values into environmental decision-making. One is an 'economic capture' approach, according (...)
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  16.  48
    John O'Neill & Thomas Uebel (2004). Horkheimer and Neurath: Restarting a Disrupted Debate. European Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):75–105.
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  17.  23
    John O'Neill, Representing People, Representing Nature, Representing the World.
    Problems of representation lie at the centre of recent experiments in deliberative democracy. The problems are not primarily social scientific questions concerning the statistical representiveness of small-scale deliberative institutions but normative questions about their political and ethical legitimacy. Experiments in deliberative democracy often rely for their representative legitimacy on appeals to the presence of members of different groups. However, they often do so without clear sources of authorisation and accountability from those represented. The representation of nonhumans and future generations in (...)
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  18.  25
    J. O'Neill (2003). Unified Science as Political Philosophy: Positivism, Pluralism and Liberalism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (3):575-596.
    Logical positivism is widely associated with an illiberal technocratic view of politics. This view is a caricature. Some members of the left Vienna circle were explicit in their criticism of this conception of politics. In particular, Neurath's work attempted to link the internal epistemological pluralism and tolerance of logical empiricism with political pluralism and the rejection of a technocratic politics. This paper examines the role that unified science played in Neurath's defence of political and social pluralism. Neurath's project of unified (...)
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  19.  7
    John O'Neill (1970). Authority, Knowledge and the Body-Politic. Southern Journal of Philosophy 8 (2-3):255-264.
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  20. Jhon O'Neill (1996). Who Won the Socialist Calculation Debate? History of Political Thought 17 (3):431-442.
     
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  21.  32
    John O'neill (2006). Knowledge, Planning, and Markets: A Missing Chapter in the Socialist Calculation Debates. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):55-78.
    This paper examines the epistemological arguments about markets and planning that emerged in a series of unpublished exchanges between Hayek and Neurath. The exchanges reveal problems for standard accounts of both the socialist calculation debates and logical empiricism. They also raise questions concerning the sources of ignorance and uncertainty in modern economies, and the role of market and non-market organisations in the distribution and coordination of limited knowledge, which remain relevant to contemporary debates in economics. Hayek had argued that Neurath's (...)
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  22.  22
    Emma R. M. Cohen, Jennifer M. O'neill, Michel Joffres, Ross E. G. Upshur & Edward Mills (2009). Reporting of Informed Consent, Standard of Care and Post-Trial Obligations in Global Randomized Intervention Trials: A Systematic Survey of Registered Trials. Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):74-80.
    Objective: Ethical guidelines are designed to ensure benefits, protection and respect of participants in clinical research. Clinical trials must now be registered on open-access databases and provide details on ethical considerations. This systematic survey aimed to determine the extent to which recently registered clinical trials report the use of standard of care and post-trial obligations in trial registries, and whether trial characteristics vary according to setting. Methods: We selected global randomized trials registered on http://www.clinicaltrials.gov and http://www.controlled-trials.com. We searched for intervention (...)
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  23.  13
    John O'Neill (1986). Formalism, Hamilton and Complex Numbers. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 17 (3):351-372.
    The development and applicability of complex numbers is often cited in defence of the formalist philosophy of mathematics. This view is rejected through an examination of hamilton's development of the notion of complex numbers as ordered pairs of reals, And his later development of the quaternion theory, Which subsequently formed the basis of vector analysis. Formalism, By protecting informal assumptions from critical scrutiny, Constrained rather than encouraged the development of mathematics.
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  24.  19
    John O'Neill (2002). Wilderness, Cultivation and Appropriation. Philosophy and Geography 5 (1):35 – 50.
    "Nature" and "wilderness" are central normative categories of environmentalism. Appeal to those categories has been subject to two lines of criticism: from constructivists who deny there is something called "nature" to be defended; from the environmental justice movement who point to the role of appeals to "nature" and "wilderness" in the appropriation of land of socially marginal populations. While these arguments often come together they are independent. This paper develops the second line of argument by placing recent appeals to "wilderness" (...)
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  25.  5
    John O'Neill (ed.) (1996). Hegel's Dialectic of Desire and Recognition: Texts and Commentary. State University of New York Press.
    Presents three generations of German, French, and Anglo-American thinking on the Hegelian narrative of desire, recognition, and alienation in life, labor, and language.
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  26. Wilson Carey McWilliams, Bob Pepperman Taylor, Bryan G. Norton, Robyn Eckersley, Joe Bowersox, J. Baird Callicott, Catriona Sandilands, John Barry, Andrew Light, Peter S. Wenz, Luis A. Vivanco, Tim Hayward, John O'Neill, Robert Paehlke, Timothy W. Luke, Robert Gottlieb & Charles T. Rubin (2002). Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Democracy and the Claims of Nature, the leading thinkers in the fields of environmental, political, and social theory come together to discuss the tensions and sympathies of democratic ideals and environmental values. The prominent contributors reflect upon where we stand in our understanding of the relationship between democracy and the claims of nature. Democracy and the Claims of Nature bridges the gap between the often competing ideals of the two fields, leading to a greater understanding of each for the (...)
     
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  27. John O'neill (1995). The Poverty of Postmodernism.
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  28.  4
    David C. Thomasma, Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Thomas Myers, Paul Tomich & James A. O'Neill (1996). The Ethics of Caring for Conjoined Twins The Lakeberg Twins. Hastings Center Report 26 (4):4-12.
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  29.  5
    Caroline Privault, Jacki O'Neill, Victor Ciriza & Jean-Michel Renders (2010). A New Tangible User Interface for Machine Learning Document Review. Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):459-479.
    This paper describes a tool for assisting lawyers and paralegal teams during document review in eDiscovery. The tool combines a machine learning technology (CategoriX) and advanced multi-touch interface capable of not only addressing the usual cost, time and accuracy issues in document review, but also of facilitating the work of the review teams by capitalizing on the intelligence of the reviewers and enabling collaborative work.
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  30. John O'Neill (1989). The Communicative Body: Studies in Communicative Philosophy, Politics, and Sociology. Northwestern University Press.
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  31.  14
    John O'Neill (1993). Future Generations: Present Harms. Philosophy 68 (263):35 - 51.
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  32.  26
    Roseanna Bourke & John O'Neill (2010). Educating Teachers About a Code of Ethical Conduct. Ethics and Education 5 (2):159-172.
    Worldwide, there is a growing expectation that teachers will act in a ?professional? manner. Professionalism, in this regard, includes identification of a unique body of occupational knowledge, adherence to desirable standards of behaviour, processes to hold members to account and commitment to what the profession regards as morally right or good. In other words, as ethical conduct. Teaching ethically involves making reasoned decisions about what to do in order to achieve the most good for learners. Often, this involves a complex (...)
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  33.  6
    John O'Neill, Managing Without Prices : The Monetary Valuation of Biodiversity.
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  34. John O'neill (1993). Future Generations: Present Harms: John O'Neill. Philosophy 68 (263):35-51.
    There is a special problem with respect to our obligations to future generations which is that we can benefit or harm them but that they cannot benefit or harm us. Goodin summarizes the point well: No analysis of intergenerational justice that is cast even vaguely in terms of reciprocity can hope to succeed. The reason is the one which Addison… puts into the mouth of an Old Fellow of College, who when he was pressed by the Society to come into (...)
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  35.  19
    Pat Devine, David Laibman & John O'Neill (2002). Participatory Planning Through Negotiated Coordination. Science and Society 66 (1):72 - 93.
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  36.  19
    John O'neill (1998). Rhetoric, Science, and Philosophy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (2):205--25.
    Recent rhetorical critiques of philosophy and science assume a contrast between rational argument and rhetoric that is inherited from an antirhetorical tradition in philosophy. This article rejects that assumption. Rhetoric is compatible with reasoned discourse in a strong sense originally outlined by Aristotle. Rhetorical analysis reveals the inadequacy of purely demonstrative accounts of rational argument and cognitive accounts of the conditions for rational assent to propo sitions. Social studies of the rhetoric of science, and in particular of credibility claims, need (...)
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  37.  21
    John O'Neill (2009). Review of Mark Sagoff, The Economy of the Earth: Philosophy, Law, and the Environment, 2nd Edition. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).
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  38.  8
    Alan Holland & J. O'Neill, Yew Trees, Butterflies, Rotting Boots and Washing Lines : The Importance of Narrative.
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  39.  18
    John O'Neill, Socialism, Associations and the Market.
    Hayek's epistemic arguments against central planning and in defence of market economies have recently been redeployed by some market-socialists against more decentralized models of non-market socialism. This paper considers the cogency of these arguments through an examination of an unpublished exchange in the socialist calculation debates between Hayek and a proponent of non-market associational models of socialism, Otto Neurath. Contrary to the standard view of the debates, Neurath shared many of the assumptions of Hayek's epistemic arguments and similarly criticized technocratic (...)
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  40.  15
    John O'Neill (1979). A Preface to Frame Analysis. Human Studies 4 (1):359 - 364.
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  41.  15
    J. M. O'Neill (1949). Is There a Catholic Constitutional Position? Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 24 (3):573-576.
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  42.  3
    M. C. & J. G. O'Neill (1930). Ancient Corinth, with a Topographical Sketch of the Corinthia. Part I: From the Earliest Times to 404 B. C. Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:371.
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  43. John O'Neill (1991). Worlds Without Content: Against Formalism. London [England] ;Routledge.
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  44. John O'Neill (2008). Happiness and the Good Life. Environmental Values 17 (2):125-144.
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  45.  12
    Dale Jamieson, Alan Carter, David Papineau & John O'Neill (1998). Tainted Cash? The Philosophers' Magazine 3 (3):26-27.
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  46.  8
    J. O'Neill, J. Martinez-Alier & G. Munda, Commensurability and Compensability in Ecological Economics.
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  47.  6
    John O'neill (2001). 9 Essences and Markets. In Uskali Mäki (ed.), The Economic World View: Studies in the Ontology of Economics. Cambridge University Press
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  48.  22
    John O'Neill (1988). Marcuse, Husserl and the Crisis of the Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):327-342.
  49.  16
    John O'Neill, Ecological Economics and the Politics of Knowledge : The Debate Between Hayek and Neurath.
    Hayek's epistemic arguments against planning were aimed not just against socialism but also the tradition of ecological economics. The concern with the physical preconditions of economic activity and defence of non-monetary measures in economic choice were expressions of the same rationalist illusion about the scope of human knowledge that underpinned the socialist project. Neurath's commitment to physicalism, in natura calculation and planning typified these errors. Neurath responded to these criticisms in unpublished notes and correspondence with Hayek. These highlighted the epistemological (...)
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  50.  5
    J. O'Neill (1998). Practical Reason and Mathematical Argument. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (2):195-205.
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