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  1. J. O. Famakinwa (2012). Is the Unexamined Life Worth Living or Not? Think 11 (31):97-103.
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  2. J. O. Famakinwa (2011). How Moderate is Kwame Gyekye's Moderate Communitarianism? Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 2 (2):65-77.
    This article undertakes a critical examination of Kwame Gyekye’s main arguments for moderate communitarianism. Contrary to the general belief among African scholars, it contends that Gyekye’s moderate communitarianism, as he presents it in Tradition and Modernity , is not as moderate as he believes it to be. The article also seeks to show that the gap which Gyekye claims exists between moderate or restricted and unrestricted communitarianism is not as wide as he suggests.
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  3. J. O. Famakinwa (2011). Interpreting the Right to Life. Diametros 29 (29):22-30.
    What does the right to life mean? The article considers three interpretations: (i) the right to life as the right to life-sustaining essentials, (ii) the right to life as the right not to be killed,s and (iii) the right to life as the right not to be killed unjustly. The article argues that (i) and (iii) accurately define the human right to life. The primary method is philosophical analysis. The article concludes that the right to life is best defined or (...)
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  4. J. O. Famakinwa (2010). The Moderate Communitarian Individual and the Primacy of Duties. Theoria 76 (2):152-166.
    Gyekye argues for the moral supremacy of certain duties. The individual is, as a natural member of the cultural community, morally obligated to respect community values; co-operate with fellow community members, be sensitive to the economic plight of others and morally expected to respect the elderly. Though Gyekye recognizes the moral need to respect certain individual rights, in the case of a moral clash between those rights and the values cherished by the community, the latter must be upheld. I wish (...)
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  5. J. O. Famakinwa (2008). Philosophy Relevance in the Contemporary World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 4:29-46.
    If philosophy is conceived as a method, seeing it beyond the traditional issues it addresses, issues that are not, strictly speaking, peculiar to it, then philosophy need not share the same criteria of relevance with science and technology. The paper argues that the generally held major criteria of relevance – utility, suitability, and social acceptability grounded on human desires and need are not philosophically satisfactory. The paper also argues that the Universalist conception of philosophy is, like science and technology, capable (...)
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  6. J. O. Famakinwa (2007). The Liberal Common Good. Diametros 12:25-43.
    The paper contains a philosophically examinesation of the notion of the common good. The major point argued is that the common good, contrary to the way it isits traditionally definedition in political philosophy, need not be communitarian alone, itbut couldan also be liberal. The paper juxtaposes the normative liberal idea of liberty to the communitarian notion of the common good. The conclusion is that the liberal notion of liberty couldan serve the common good, especially in a liberal society. Theis idea (...)
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