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Profile: James O. Young (University of Victoria)
  1. J. O. Young (2011). Kivy on Musical Genius. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (1):1-12.
    Peter Kivy argues that Handel was the first composer to be regarded as a genius and that only in the eighteenth century was the philosophical apparatus in place that would enable any composer to be conceived of as a musical genius. According to Kivy, a Longinian conception of genius transformed Handel into a genius. A Platonic conception of genius was used to classify Mozart as a genius. Then Kant adopted a Longinian conception of genius and this shaped the perception of (...)
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  2. J. O. Young (2007). Michael Dummett, Thought and Reality. Philosophy in Review 27 (5):334.
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  3. J. O. Young (2001). A Defence of the Coherence Theory of Truth. Journal of Philosophical Research 26 (1):89--101.
    Recent critics of the coherence theory of truth (notably Ralph Walker) have alleged that the theory is incoherent, since its defence presupposes the correctness of the contrary correspondence theory of truth. Coherentists must specify the system of propositions with which true propositons cohere (the specified system). Generally, coherentists claim that the specified system is a system composed of propositions believed by a community. Critics of coherentism maintain that the coherentist’s assertions about which system is the specified system must be true, (...)
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