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  1.  73
    William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.) (2009). The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology. Blackwell Pub.
    With the help of in-depth essays from some of the world's leading philosophers, _The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology_ explores the nature and existence of God through human reason and evidence from the natural world. Provides in-depth and cutting-edge treatment of natural theology's main arguments Includes contributions from first-rate philosophers well known for their work on the relevant topics Updates relevant arguments in light of the most current, state-of-the-art philosophical and scientific discussions Stands in useful contrast and opposition to the (...)
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  2.  64
    J. P. Moreland & Timothy Pickavance (2003). Bare Particulars and Individuation Reply to Mertz. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):1 – 13.
    Not long ago, one of us has clarified and defended a bare particular theory of individuation. More recently, D. W. Mertz has raised a set of objections against this account and other accounts of bare particulars and proffered an alternative theory of individuation. He claims to have shown that 'the concept of bare particulars, and consequently substratum ontology that requires it, is untenable.' We disagree with this claim and believe there are adequate responses to the three arguments Mertz raises against (...)
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  3.  19
    J. P. Moreland & William Lane Craig (2003). Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview. Intervarsity Press.
    The authors of this lively and thorough introduction to philosophy from a Christian perspective introduce you to the principal subdisciplines of philosophy, including epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of science, ethics and philosophy ...
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  4.  59
    J. P. Moreland (1998). Theories of Individuation: A Reconsideration of Bare Particulars. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3):251–263.
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  5. J. P. Moreland (2003). A Response to a Platonistic and to a Set-Theoretic Objection to the Kalam Cosmological Argument. Religious Studies 39 (4):373-390.
    The first premise of the Kalam cosmological argument has come under fire in the last few years. The premise states that the universe had a beginning, and one of two prominent arguments for it turns on the claim that an actual infinite collection of entities cannot exist. After stating the Kalam cosmological argument and the two approaches to defending its first premise, I respond to two objections against the notion that an actual infinite collection is impossible: a Platonistic objection from (...)
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  6.  19
    J. P. Moreland (2015). Properties by Douglas Edwards. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 69 (1):130-132.
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  7. J. P. Moreland (2011). Substance Dualism and the Argument From Self-Awareness. Philosophia Christi 13 (1):21-34.
     
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  8.  16
    J. P. Moreland (2000). Issues and Options in Individuation. Grazer Philosophische Studien 60:31-54.
    Construed metaphysically, the problem of individuation is the problem of offering an ontological assay of two entities that share all their pure properties in common so as to offer an account of what makes them distinct particulars. This article provides a survey of the major contemporary attempts to answer this problem. To accomplish this goal, the most important contemporary advocates of each solution is analyzed: the trope nominalism of Keith Campbell, the realism of D. M. Armstrong, the Leibnizian essence view (...)
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  9.  23
    J. P. Moreland (1989). Keith Campbell and the Trope View of Predication. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (4):379 – 393.
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  10.  24
    J. P. Moreland (2009). The Argument From Consciousness. In William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology. Blackwell Pub 282--343.
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  11.  24
    J. P. Moreland (1997). A Critique of Campbell's Refurbished Nominalism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (2):225-246.
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  12.  20
    J. P. Moreland (2005). If You Can't Reduce, You Must Eliminate. Philosophia Christi 7 (2):463-474.
  13. J. P. Moreland (2012). God and the Argument From Consciousness: A Reply to Lim. European Journal for the Philosophy of Religion 4 (1):243-251.
    Recently, Daniel Lim has published a thoughtful critique of one form of my argument for the existence of God from consciousness (hereafter, AC). After stating his presentation of the relevant contours of my argument, I shall present the main components of his critique, followed by my response. Since one purpose of my publications of AC has been to foster discussion about a neglected argument for God’s existence, I am thankful to Lim for his interesting article and the chance to further (...)
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  14. J. P. Moreland (2003). A Materialist Metaphysics Of The Human Person. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 39 (2):235-241.
     
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  15.  34
    J. P. Moreland (2013). A Conceptualist Argument for a Spiritual Substantial Soul. Religious Studies 49 (1):35-43.
    I advance a type of conceptualist argument for substance dualism based on the understandability of what it would be for something to be a spirit, e.g. what it would be for God to be a spirit. After presenting the argument formally, I clarify and defend its various premises with a special focus on what I take to be the most controversial one, namely, if thinking matter is metaphysically possible, it is not the case that we have a distinct positive concept (...)
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  16.  32
    J. P. Moreland (1995). Humanness, Personhood, and the Right to Die. Faith and Philosophy 12 (1):95-112.
    A widely adopted approach to end-of-life ethical questions fails to make explicit certain crucial metaphysical ideas entailed by it and when those ideas are clarified, then it can be shown to be inadequate. These metaphysical themes cluster around the notions of personal identity, personhood and humanness, and the metaphysics of substance. In order to clarify and critique the approach just mentioned, I focus on the writings of Robert N. Wennberg as a paradigm case by, first, stating his views of personal (...)
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  17.  33
    J. P. Moreland (1989). Was Husserl a Nominalist? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (4):661-674.
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  18.  27
    J. P. Moreland (2012). Oppy on the Argument From Consciousness. Faith and Philosophy 29 (1):70-83.
    Graham Oppy has launched the most effective criticism to date of an argument for God’s existence from the existence of irreducible mental states or theirregular correlation with physical states (AC). I seek to undercut Oppy’s central defeaters of AC. In particular, I argue, first, that Oppy has not provided successful defeaters against the use of a distinctive form of explanation—personal explanation—employed in premise (3) of AC; second, I expose a confusion on Oppy’s part with respect to AC’s premise (5), and (...)
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  19.  28
    J. P. Moreland (1997). Naturalism and Libertarian Agency. Philosophy and Theology 10 (2):353-383.
    While most philosophers agree that libertarian agency and naturalism are incompatible, few attempts have been offered to spell out in some detail just why this is the case. My purpose in this article is to fill this gap in the literature by expanding on and clarifying the connection between naturalism as it is widely understood today and the rejection of libertarian agency. To accomplish this end I begin by clarifying different forms of libertarian agency and identity the key philosophical components (...)
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  20.  8
    J. P. Moreland (2002). Naturalism, Nominalism, and Husserlain Moments. Modern Schoolman 79 (2-3):199-216.
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  21.  15
    J. P. Moreland (1996). Issues and Options in Exemplification. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (2):133 - 147.
    In this article I offer a taxonomy of the major issues and options about qualities, quality-instances, and exemplification. So far as I know, this has not been done for some time and the task of offering such a taxonomy is a worthy one in its own right. But such a classification will also show that arguments such as the one above by Grossmann fail to make their case because of the tremendous vari? ety of positions about quality-instances. The mere fact (...)
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  22.  2
    J. P. Moreland (1998). Locke's Parity Thesis About Thinking Matter: A Response to Williams. Religious Studies 34 (3):253-259.
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  23.  36
    J. P. Moreland (1998). Locke's Parity Thesis About Thinking Matter: A Response to Williams. Religious Studies 34 (3):253-259.
    Recently, Clifford Williams has attempted to argue for the plausibility of a Christian form of physicalism. To make his case, Williams appropriates certain claims by John Locke regarding the possibility of thinking matter to argue for what Williams calls the parity theses: (1) God can make matter and nonmatter either to think or not to think. Given God's omnipotence, the justification for (1) is: (2) there is no contradiction in asserting either that matter or nonmatter thinks or that they do (...)
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  24.  4
    J. P. Moreland (2002). Naturalism, Nominalism, and Husserlain Moments. Modern Schoolman 79 (2-3):199-216.
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  25.  32
    J. P. Moreland (2003). Hud Hudson a Materialist Metaphysics of the Human Person. (Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press, 2001). Pp. XII+202. £25.95 (Hbk). ISBN 0 8014 3889. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 39 (2):235-241.
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  26.  8
    J. P. Moreland (2003). Resemblance Extreme Nominalism and Infinite Regress Arguments. Modern Schoolman 80 (2):85-98.
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  27. J. P. Moreland (2003). A Response to a Platonistic and to a Set-Theoretic Objection to the Kalam Cosmological Argument. Religious Studies 39 (4):373-390.
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  28.  15
    J. P. Moreland (1988). An Enduring Self. Process Studies 17 (3):193-199.
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  29.  13
    J. P. Moreland (1997). Libertarian Agency and the Craig/Grünbaum Debate About Theistic Explanation of the Initial Singularity. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (4):539-554.
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  30.  14
    J. P. Moreland (2000). Christian Materialism and the Parity Thesis Revisited. International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (4):423-440.
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  31.  6
    J. P. Moreland (2013). A Conceptualist Argument for a Spiritual Substantial Soul. Religious Studies 49 (1):35-43.
    I advance a type of conceptualist argument for substance dualism based on the understandability of what it would be for something to be a spirit, e.g. what it would be for God to be a spirit. After presenting the argument formally, I clarify and defend its various premises with a special focus on what I take to be the most controversial one, namely, if thinking matter is metaphysically possible, it is not the case that we have a distinct positive concept (...)
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  32.  13
    J. P. Moreland (1990). Nominalism and Abstract Reference. American Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):325 - 334.
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  33.  11
    J. P. Moreland (1989). Self, God, and Immortality. International Philosophical Quarterly 29 (4):480-483.
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  34.  16
    J. P. Moreland (2001). Topic Neutrality and the Parity Thesis: A Surrejoinder to Williams. Religious Studies 37 (1):93-101.
    In an important paper, Clifford Williams advanced a Lockean-style argument to justify the parity thesis, viz., that there is no intellectual advantage to Christian physicalism or Christian dualism. In an article in Religious Studies I offered a critique of Williams's parity thesis and he has published a rejoinder to me in the same journal centring on my rejection of topic neutrality as an appropriate way to set up the mind–body debate. In this surrejoinder to Williams, I present his three main (...)
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  35.  2
    J. P. Moreland (2003). Resemblance Extreme Nominalism and Infinite Regress Arguments. Modern Schoolman 80 (2):85-98.
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  36.  13
    J. P. Moreland (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 102 (407):504-507.
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  37. William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.) (2009). The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology. Wiley-Blackwell.
    With the help of in-depth essays from some of the world's leading philosophers, _The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology_ explores the nature and existence of God through human reason and evidence from the natural world. Provides in-depth and cutting-edge treatment of natural theology's main arguments Includes contributions from first-rate philosophers well known for their work on the relevant topics Updates relevant arguments in light of the most current, state-of-the-art philosophical and scientific discussions Stands in useful contrast and opposition to the (...)
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  38. William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.) (2012). The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology. Wiley-Blackwell.
    With the help of in-depth essays from some of the world's leading philosophers, _The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology_ explores the nature and existence of God through human reason and evidence from the natural world. Provides in-depth and cutting-edge treatment of natural theology's main arguments Includes contributions from first-rate philosophers well known for their work on the relevant topics Updates relevant arguments in light of the most current, state-of-the-art philosophical and scientific discussions Stands in useful contrast and opposition to the (...)
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  39. William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.) (2009). The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology. Wiley-Blackwell.
    With the help of in-depth essays from some of the world's leading philosophers, _The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology_ explores the nature and existence of God through human reason and evidence from the natural world. Provides in-depth and cutting-edge treatment of natural theology's main arguments Includes contributions from first-rate philosophers well known for their work on the relevant topics Updates relevant arguments in light of the most current, state-of-the-art philosophical and scientific discussions Stands in useful contrast and opposition to the (...)
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  40. William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.) (2012). The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology. Wiley-Blackwell.
    With the help of in-depth essays from some of the world's leading philosophers, _The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology_ explores the nature and existence of God through human reason and evidence from the natural world. Provides in-depth and cutting-edge treatment of natural theology's main arguments Includes contributions from first-rate philosophers well known for their work on the relevant topics Updates relevant arguments in light of the most current, state-of-the-art philosophical and scientific discussions Stands in useful contrast and opposition to the (...)
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  41. William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.) (2014). Naturalism: A Critical Analysis. Routledge.
    Naturalism provides a rigorous analysis and critique of the major varieties of contemporary philosophical naturalism. The authors advocate the thesis that contemporary naturalism should be abandoned, in light of the serious objections raised against it. Contributors draw on a wide range of topics including: epistemology, the philosophy of science, the philosophy of mind and agency, and natural theology.
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  42. William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.) (2002). Naturalism: A Critical Analysis. Routledge.
    _Naturalism_ provides a rigorous analysis and critique of the major varieties of contemporary philosophical naturalism. The authors advocate the thesis that contemporary naturalism should be abandoned, in light of the serious objections raised against it. Contributors draw on a wide range of topics including: epistemology, the philosophy of science, the philosophy of mind and agency, and natural theology.
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  43. J. P. Moreland (2008). Consciousness and the Existence of God: A Theistic Argument. Routledge.
    In _Consciousness and the Existence of God_, J.P. Moreland argues that the existence of finite, irreducible consciousness provides evidence for the existence of God. Moreover, he analyzes and criticizes the top representative of rival approaches to explaining the origin of consciousness, including John Searle’s contingent correlation, Timothy O’Connor’s emergent necessitation, Colin McGinn’s mysterian ‘‘naturalism,’’ David Skrbina’s panpsychism and Philip Clayton’s pluralistic emergentist monism. Moreland concludes that these approaches should be rejected in favor of what he calls ‘‘the Argument from Consciousness.’’.
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  44. J. P. Moreland (2009). Consciousness and the Existence of God: A Theistic Argument. Routledge.
    _In __Consciousness and the Existence of God_, J.P. Moreland argues that the existence of finite, irreducible consciousness provides evidence for the existence of God. Moreover, he analyzes and criticizes the top representative of rival approaches to explaining the origin of consciousness, including John Searle’s contingent correlation, Timothy O’Connor’s emergent necessitation, Colin McGinn’s mysterian "naturalism," David Skrbina’s panpsychism and Philip Clayton’s pluralistic emergentist monism. Moreland concludes that these approaches should be rejected in favor of what he calls "the Argument from Consciousness.".
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  45. J. P. Moreland, K. A. Sweis & Ch V. Meister (eds.) (2013). Debating Christian Theism.
     
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  46. J. P. Moreland (1989). James Rachels: "The End of Life". [REVIEW] The Thomist 53 (4):714.
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  47. J. P. Moreland (2002). Miracles, Agency, and Theistic Science: A Reply to Steven B. Cowan. Philosophia Christi 4 (1):139 - 160.
    Steve Cowan had criticized my defense of theistic science on four grounds: (1) my critique of compatibilism attacks a straw man; (2) libertarianism cannot meet some of the conditions for responsible action; (3) attributing libertarian agency to God has the unacceptable implication that God can do evil; and (4) we don’t need libertarianism to provide a model of divine actions sufficient to justify the scientific detectability of miracles. I clarify and respond to these points in the order listed and conclude (...)
     
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  48. J. P. Moreland (2011). Oppy on the Argument From Consciousness: A Rejoinder. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (1):213 - 226.
    Graham Oppy had criticized my argument for God from consciousness (AC) in my recent book ’Consciousness and the Existence of God’ (N.Y.: Routledge, 2008). In this article I offer a rejoinder to Oppy. Specifically, I respond to his criticisms of my presentation of three forms of AC, and interact with his claims about theism, consciousness and emergent chemical properties.
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  49. J. P. Moreland (2007). Running in Place or Running in its Proper Place. In Michael W. Austin (ed.), Running & Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell Pub.
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  50. J. P. Moreland (2001). Replies to Evan Fales: On Science, Miracles, Agency Theory, and the God-of-the-Gaps. Philosophia Christi 3 (1):48 - 49.
    In a previous article, I argue that on the assumption that God exercises libertarian agency, a primary causal divine miracle could, in principle, leave a scientifically detectable gap in the natural world. In a subsequent publication, Evan Fales offered a critique of my argument and this article is my rejoinder. I justify my employment of Divine libertarian agency and respond to Fales’s two, closely-related questions: How much energy could one add to a room by making a lot of decisions? Would (...)
     
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