Search results for 'J. Preston Christopher' (try it on Scholar)

  1.  4
    Christopher J. Preston (2007). Wayne Ouderkirkand Christopher J. Preston. In Christopher J. Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk (ed.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, Iii. Springer 8.
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  2.  16
    Christopher J. Preston (1998). Epistemology and Intrinsic Values: Norton and Callicott's Critiques of Rolston. Environmental Ethics 20 (4):409-428.
    Debates over the existence of intrinsic value have long been central to professional environmental ethics. Holmes Rolston, III’s version of intrinsic value is, perhaps, the most well known. Recently, powerful critiques leveled by Bryan G. Norton and J. Baird Callicott have suggested that there is an epistemological problem with Rolston’s account. In this paper, I argue first that the debates over intrinsic value are as pertinent now as they have ever been. I then explain the objections that Norton and Callicott (...)
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  3. Christopher J. Preston (ed.) (2012). Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management. Lexington Books.
    Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management is a wide-ranging and expert analysis of the ethics of the intentional management of solar radiation. This book will be a useful tool for policy-makers, a provocation for ethicists, and an eye-opening analysis for both the scientist and the general reader with interest in climate change.
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  4. Christopher J. Preston (2003). Grounding Knowledge Environmental Philosophy, Epistemology, and Place.
     
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  5.  2
    Christopher J. Preston (2008). Synthetic Biology: Drawing a Line in Darwin's Sand. Environmental Values 17 (1):23 - 39.
    Maintaining the coherence of the distinction between nature and artefact has long been central to environmental thinking. By building genomes from scratch out of 'bio-bricks', synthetic biology promises to create biotic artefacts markedly different from anything created thus far in biotechnology. These new biotic artefacts depart from a core principle of Darwinian natural selection – descent through modification – leaving them with no causal connection to historical evolutionary processes. This departure from the core principle of Darwinism presents a challenge to (...)
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  6.  8
    Christopher J. Preston (2011). Re-Thinking the Unthinkable: Environmental Ethics and the Presumptive Argument Against Geoengineering. Environmental Values 20 (4):457 - 479.
    The rapid rise in interest in geoengineering the climate as a response to global warming presents a clear and significant challenge to environmental ethics. The paper articulates what I call the 'presumptive argument' against geoengineering from environmental ethics, a presumption strong enough to make geoengineering almost 'unthinkable' from within that tradition. Two rationales for suspending that presumption are next considered. One of them is a 'lesser evil' argument, the other makes connections between the presumptive argument, ecofacism, and the anthropocentrism/non-anthropocentrism debate. (...)
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  7.  2
    Christopher J. Preston (2001). Intrinsic Value and Care: Making Connections Through Ecological Narratives. Environmental Values 10 (2):243 - 263.
    Vitriolic debates between supporters of the intrinsic value and the care approaches to environmental ethics make it sound as though these two sides share no common ground. Yet ecofeminist Jim Cheney holds up Holmes Rolston's work as a paragon of feminist sensibility. I explore where Cheney gets this idea from and try to root out some potential connections between intrinsic value and care approaches. The common ground is explored through Alasdair Maclntyre's articulation of a narrative ethics and the development of (...)
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  8.  14
    Christopher J. Preston (2012). Beyond the End of Nature: SRM and Two Tales of Artificity for the Anthropocene. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (2):188 - 201.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 188-201, June 2012.
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  9. Christopher J. Preston (2005). The Promise and Threat of Nanotechnology: Can Environmental Ethics Guide US? Hyle 11 (1):19 - 44.
    The growing presence of the products of nanotechnology in the public domain raises a number of ethical questions. This paper considers whether existing environmental ethics can provide some guidance on these questions. After a brief discussion of the appropriateness of an environmental ethics framework for the task at hand, the paper identifies a representative environmental ethic and uses it to evaluate four salient issues that emerge from nanotechnology. The discussion is intended both to give an initial theoretical take on nanotechnology (...)
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  10.  6
    Christopher J. Preston (2015). Framing an Ethics of Climate Management for the Anthropocene. Climatic Change 130 (3):359–369.
    In addition to carbon dioxide, it is becoming increasingly clear that there are numerous other potent agents of anthropogenic forcing (e.g. methane, ozone, black carbon) at work in the climate system today. The typical ethical framing of climate change has not yet accommodated this complexity. In addition, geoengineering has often been presented as a Plan B that would simply counter unintentional (and positive) anthropogenic forcing with intentional (and negative) anthropogenic forcing. This paper attempts to better address the complexity by outlining (...)
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  11.  1
    Christopher J. Preston (2015). The Multiple Anthropocenes: Toward Fracturing a Totalizing Discourse. Environmental Ethics 37 (3):307-320.
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  12.  4
    Christopher J. Preston (2002). Animality and Morality: Human Reason as an Animal Activity. Environmental Values 11 (4):427 - 442.
    Those in animal and environmental ethics wishing to extend moral considerability beyond the human community have at some point all had to counter the claim that it is reason that makes human distinct. Detailed arguments against the significance of reason have been rare due to the lack of any good empirical accounts of what reason actually is. Contemporary studies of the embodied mind are now able to fill this gap and show why reason is a poor choice for a criterion (...)
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  13.  4
    Christopher J. Preston & Steven H. Corey (2005). Public Health and Environmentalism: Adding Garbarge to the History of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):3-21.
    There exists in the United States a popular account of the historical roots of environmental philosophy which is worth noting not simply as a matter of historical interest, but also as a source book for some of the key ideas that lend shape to contemporary North American environmental philosophy. However, this folk wisdom about the historical beginnings of North American environmental thinking is incomplete. The wilderness-based history commonly used by environmental philosophers should be supplemented with the neglected story of garbage (...)
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  14.  7
    Christopher J. Preston (2005). Pluralism and Naturalism: Why the Proliferation of Theories is Good for the Mind. Philosophical Psychology 18 (6):715 – 735.
    A number of those that have advocated for theoretical pluralism in epistemology suggest that naturalistic arguments from cognitive science can support their case. Yet these theorists have traditionally faced two pressing needs. First, they have needed a cognitive science adequate to the task. Second, they have needed a bridge between whatever scientific account of cognition they favor and the normative claims of a pluralistic epistemology. Both of these challenges are addressed below in an argument for theoretical pluralism that brings together (...)
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  15.  6
    Christopher J. Preston (2000). Philosophy and Geography. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):215-218.
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  16.  27
    Christopher J. Preston (2005). Epistemology and Environmental Philosophy: The Epistemic Significance of Place. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):1-4.
  17.  7
    Christopher J. Preston (forthcoming). Moral Turbulence and Geoengineering: A Lingering Hazard From the Perfect Moral Storm. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  18.  5
    Holly Jean Buck, Andrea R. Gammon & Christopher J. Preston (2014). Gender and Geoengineering. Hypatia 29 (3):651-669.
    Geoengineering has been broadly and helpfully defined as “the intentional manipulation of the earth's climate to counteract anthropogenic climate change or its warming effects” (Corner and Pidgeon , 26). Although there exists a rapidly growing literature on the ethics of geoengineering, very little has been written about its gender dimensions. The authors consider four contexts in which geoengineering appears to have important gender dimensions: (1) the demographics of those pushing the current agenda, (2) the overall vision of control it involves, (...)
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  19.  8
    Christopher J. Preston (2000). Conversing with Nature in a Postmodern Epistemological Framework. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):227-240.
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Jim Cheney argues for a postmodern epistemological framework that supports a conception of inquiry as a kind of “conversation” with nature. I examine how Cheney arrives at this metaphor and consider why it might be an appealing one for environmental philosophers. I note how, in the absence of an animistic account of nature, this metaphor turns out to be problematic. A closer examination of the postmodern insights that Cheney employs reveals that it is (...)
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  20.  2
    Christopher J. Preston (2002). Gender, Place, and Identity: Understanding Feminist Geographies (Review). Hypatia 17 (1):219-222.
  21.  9
    Christopher J. Preston (2002). Book Review: Linda McDowell. Gender, Place, and Identity: Understanding Feminist Geographies. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (1):219-222.
  22.  10
    J. Preston Christopher, Y. Sheinin Maxim, J. Sproat Denyse & P. Swarup Vimal (2010). The Novelty of Nano and the Regulatory Challenge of Newness. NanoEthics 4 (1).
    A great deal has been made of the question of whether nano-materials provide a unique set of ethical challenges. Equally important is the question of whether they provide a unique set of regulatory challenges. In the last 18 months, the US Environmental Protection Agency has begun the process of trying to meet the regulatory challenge of nano using the Toxic Substances Control Act (1976)(TSCA). In this central piece of legislation, ‘newness’ is a critical concept. Current EPA policy, we argue, does (...)
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  23.  6
    Christopher J. Preston (2009). Moral Knowledge: Real and Grounded in Place. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):175 – 186.
    Recent work in ethics and epistemology argues that physical surroundings have normative force. The ideas of 'grounding knowledge' and 'real ethics' provide an important way to understand sense of place. This paper uses this work to argue that there is a moral structure to material culture, and that the existence of this moral structure makes it necessary for us to pay attention to the epistemic import of the physical environments we create and live in. Since environments are thick with moral (...)
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  24.  1
    Christopher J. Preston (2014). Philosophical Clarity and Real-World Debate. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (2):139-142.
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  25.  2
    Christopher J. Preston (2005). Restoring Misplaced Epistemology. Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):373 – 384.
  26. Christopher J. Preston (2002). Book Review: Linda McDowell. Gender, Place, and Identity: Understanding Feminist Geographies. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 17 (1):219-222.
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  27. Christopher J. Preston (2016). Climate Engineering and the Cessation Requirement: The Ethics of a Life-Cycle. Environmental Values 25 (1):91-107.
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  28. Christopher J. Preston (ed.) (2016). Climate Justice and Geoengineering: Ethics and Policy in the Atmospheric Anthropocene. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A collection of original and innovative essays that compare the justice issues raised by climate engineering to the justice issues raised by competing approaches to solving the climate problem.
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  29. Christopher J. Preston (2005). Epistemology and Environmental Philosophy:The Epistemic Significance of Place. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):1-4.
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  30. Christopher J. Preston (ed.) (2013). Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management. Lexington Books.
    Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management is a wide-ranging and expert analysis of the ethics of the intentional management of solar radiation. This book will be a useful tool for policy-makers, a provocation for ethicists, and an eye-opening analysis for both the scientist and the general reader with interest in climate change.
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  31.  12
    Christopher C. Robinson (2008). Christopher J. Preston, Wayne Ouderkirk (Eds): Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (5):477-484.
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  32.  11
    Doug Seale (2010). Christopher J. Preston: Saving Creation: Nature and Faith in the Life of Holmes Rolston III. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (3):279-288.
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  33.  23
    Robert A. Preston (1967). John Dewey. By Richard J. Bernstein. Modern Schoolman 45 (1):68-69.
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  34.  4
    Constance L. Benson, Rowland Christopher, Wendy Dabourne, Brian Davies & G. R. Evans (1999). Abraham, William J.(1998) Canon and Criterion in Christian Theology. New York: Oxford University Press, $110.00, 500 Pp. Barnett, SJ (1999) Idol Temples and Crafty Priests: The Origins of Enlightenment Anticlericalism. New York: St Martin's Press, $59.95, 197 Pp. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 46:197-198.
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  35. B. Preston (1994). Review of Francisco J. Varela, Evan Thompson & Eleanor Rosch's The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 7:503-503.
     
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  36.  8
    Christopher Preston, Maxim Sheinin, Denyse Sproat & Vimal Swarup (2010). The Novelty of Nano and the Regulatory Challenge of Newness. NanoEthics 4 (1):13-26.
    A great deal has been made of the question of whether nano-materials provide a unique set of ethical challenges. Equally important is the question of whether they provide a unique set of regulatory challenges. In the last 18 months, the US Environmental Protection Agency has begun the process of trying to meet the regulatory challenge of nano using the Toxic Substances Control Act (1976)(TSCA). In this central piece of legislation, ‘newness’ is a critical concept. Current EPA policy, we argue, does (...)
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  37.  42
    H. J. Glock & John M. Preston (1995). Externalism and First-Person Authority. The Monist 78 (4):515-33.
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  38.  9
    Alicia J. Hofelich & Stephanie D. Preston (2012). The Meaning in Empathy: Distinguishing Conceptual Encoding From Facial Mimicry, Trait Empathy, and Attention to Emotion. Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):119-128.
  39.  8
    Christopher Preston (2011). Environmental Knowledge: Courteous Yet Subversive, Grounded Yet Surprising. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (1):91-96.
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  40.  1
    D. J. Foskett, John Hayes, John Cumming, M. F. Cleugh, E. B. Castle, A. E. M. Seaborne, K. G. Mukherjee, S. Beaumont, K. W. Keohane, John Lawson, C. P. Hill, Brian Holmes, R. D. Gidney, L. J. Lewis, Maurice Preston & A. C. F. Beales (1968). Short Notices. British Journal of Educational Studies 16 (2):220-232.
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  41. Phillip M. Kleepsies, Pamela J. Miller & Thomas A. Preston (2008). End-of-Life Choices. In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge
     
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  42. Christopher D. Preston (2016). Methodus Plantarum Nova: John Ray. Annals of Science 73 (1):108-110.
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  43. Christopher Preston & Wayne Ouderkirk (eds.) (2006). Nature, Value Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III. Springer.
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  44. Stephanie Preston & Alicia J. Hofelich (2012). The Many Faces of Empathy: Parsing Emathic Phenomena Through a Proximate, Dynamic-Systems View Reprsenting the Other in the Self. Emotion Review 4 (1):24-33.
    A surfeit of research confirms that people activate personal, affective, and conceptual representations when perceiving the states of others. However, researchers continue to debate the role of self–other overlap in empathy due to a failure to dissociate neural overlap, subjective resonance, and personal distress. A perception–action view posits that neural-level overlap is necessary during early processing for all social understanding, but need not be conscious or aversive. This neural overlap can subsequently produce a variety of states depending on the context (...)
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  45.  6
    Doohwan Ahn, Sanda Badescu, Giorgio Baruchello, Raj Nath Bhat, Laura Boileau, Rosalind Carey, Camelia-Mihaela Cmeciu, Alan Goldstone, James Grieve, John Grumley, Grant Havers, Stefan Höjelid, Peter Isackson, Marguerite Johnson, Adrienne Kertzer, J.-Guy Lalande, Clinton R. Long, Joseph Mali, Ben Marsden, Peter Monteath, Michael Edward Moore, Jeff Noonan, Lynda Payne, Joyce Senders Pedersen, Brayton Polka, Lily Polliack, John Preston, Anthony Pym, Marina Ritzarev, Joseph Rouse, Peter N. Saeta, Arthur B. Shostak, Stanley Shostak, Marcia Landy, Kenneth R. Stunkel, I. I. I. Wheeler & Phillip H. Wiebe (2009). Null. The European Legacy 14 (6):731-771.
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  46. Thomas J. Preston, The Origins and Development of Association Football in Th eLiverpool District, C.1879 Until C.1915.
    This thesis examines how association football evolved in Liverpool in the period before the Great War, and how the sport impacted on the lives of Liverpudlians during this period. Specific consideration is given in the first two chapters to the introduction of football to Liverpool and its progressive commercialisation. The third chapter examines the backgrounds of the city's professional footballers and their relationship with supporters and clubs. The role in Liverpool of amateur, semi-professional, and schoolboy football is considered in the (...)
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  47.  44
    Stephanie D. Preston & Alicia J. Hofelich (2012). Author Reply: Understanding Empathy by Modeling Rather Than Organizing Its Contents. Emotion Review 4 (1):38-39.
    Perception–action approaches are sometimes criticized because empathy takes cognitive forms and people do not overtly imitate or feel all observed states. These complaints reflect a misunderstanding of the framework, which we tried to clarify through a review that bridged social and neuroscientific views. Far from “simple fixes,” these misunderstandings appear to reflect deeply rooted differences in the way that each discipline conceptualizes science and the mind. We address the important points made by the commentators and reiterate the need to incorporate (...)
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  48.  15
    Myra J. Christopher (2007). "Show Me" Bioethics and Politics. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (10):28 – 33.
    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy (...)
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  49.  63
    Aaron Preston (2005). Quality Instances and the Structure of the Concrete Particular. Axiomathes 15 (2):267-292.
    In this paper, I examine a puzzle that emerges from what J. P. Moreland has called the traditional realist view of quality instances. Briefly put, the puzzle is to figure out how quality instances fit into the overall structure of a concrete particular, given that the traditional realist view of quality instances prima facie seems incompatible with what might be called the traditional realist view of concrete particulars. After having discussed the traditional realist views involved and the puzzle that emerges (...)
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  50.  2
    J. Preston, D. M. Wegner, E. Morsella, J. A. Bargh & P. M. Gollwitzer (2009). Elbow Grease: The Experience of Effort in Action. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press
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