172 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
James Russell [29]John E. Russell [21]James A. Russell [17]J. S. Russell [15]
John Russell [13]John L. Russell [11]J. Russell [11]Jeffrey Russell [11]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also:
Profile: James Russell (Trent University)
Profile: John Russell
Profile: John Russell (University of Oregon)
Profile: Jessica Russell (Elon College)
Profile: Jared Russell
Profile: Jayrus Russell
Profile: Jeffrey Sanford Russell (University of Southern California)
  1.  99
    James A. Russell, Erika L. Rosenberg & Marc D. Lewis (2011). Introduction to a Special Section on Basic Emotion Theory. Emotion Review 3 (4):363-363.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  9
    J. S. Russell (1999). Are Rules All an Umpire Has to Work With? Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):27-49.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   26 citations  
  3.  43
    John E. Russell (1906). Objective Idealism and Revised Empiricism. Philosophical Review 15 (6):627-633.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  44
    John E. Russell (1910). The Humanist Theory of Value. Mind 19 (76):547-549.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  79
    Jan Russell (1991). Reviews : Nikolas Rose, Governing the Soul: The Shaping of the Private Self, London: Routledge, 1990, £30.00, Xiv + 304 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):463-466.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  4
    J. S. Russell (2004). Moral Realism in Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (2):142-160.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  7. Jeffrey Sanford Russell (2013). Actuality for Counterpart Theorists. Mind 122 (485):85-134.
    The counterpart theorist has a problem: there is no obvious way to understand talk about actuality in terms of counterparts. Fara and Williamson have charged that this obstacle cannot be overcome. Here I defend the counterpart theorist by offering systematic interpretations of a quantified modal language that includes an actuality operator. Centrally, I disentangle the counterpart relation from a related notion, a ‘representation relation’. The relation of possible things to the actual things they represent is variable, and an adequate account (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8.  6
    J. S. Russell (2007). Broad Internalism and the Moral Foundations of Sport. In William J. Morgan (ed.), Ethics in Sport. Human Kinetics, Inc 51--66.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  9.  3
    Nicole L. Nelson & James A. Russell (2013). Universality Revisited. Emotion Review 5 (1):8-15.
    Evidence does not support the claim that observers universally recognize basic emotions from signals on the face. The percentage of observers who matched the face with the predicted emotion (matching score) is not universal, but varies with culture and language. Matching scores are also inflated by the commonly used methods: within-subject design; posed, exaggerated facial expressions (devoid of context); multiple examples of each type of expression; and a response format that funnels a variety of interpretations into one word specified by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  82
    Jeffrey Sanford Russell, John Hawthorne & Lara Buchak (2015). Groupthink. Philosophical Studies 172 (5):1287-1309.
    How should a group with different opinions (but the same values) make decisions? In a Bayesian setting, the natural question is how to aggregate credences: how to use a single credence function to naturally represent a collection of different credence functions. An extension of the standard Dutch-book arguments that apply to individual decision-makers recommends that group credences should be updated by conditionalization. This imposes a constraint on what aggregation rules can be like. Taking conditionalization as a basic constraint, we gather (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  83
    James Russell (2014). Episodic Memory as Re-Experiential Memory: Kantian, Developmental, and Neuroscientific Currents. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):391-411.
    Recent work on the early development of episodic memory in my laboratory has been fuelled by the following assumption: if episodic memory is re-experiential memory then Kant’s analysis of the spatiotemporal nature of experience should constrain and positively influence theories of episodic memory development. The idea is that re-experiential memory will “inherit” these spatiotemporal features. On the basis of this assumption, Russell and Hanna (Mind and Language 27(1):29–54, 2012) proposed that (a) the spatial element of re-experience is egocentric and (b) (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  13
    J. S. Russell (2005). The Value of Dangerous Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (1):1-19.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  13. Jeffrey Sanford Russell (2008). The Structure of Gunk: Adventures in the Ontology of Space. In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics: Volume 4. Oxford University Press 248.
    Here are two ways space might be (not the only two): (1) Space is “pointy”. Every finite region has infinitely many infinitesimal, indivisible parts, called points. Points are zero-dimensional atoms of space. In addition to points, there are other kinds of “thin” boundary regions, like surfaces of spheres. Some regions include their boundaries—the closed regions—others exclude them—the open regions—and others include some bits of boundary and exclude others. Moreover, space includes unextended regions whose size is zero. (2) Space is “gunky”.1 (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  45
    James A. Russell (2012). Introduction to Special Section: On Defining Emotion. Emotion Review 4 (4):337-337.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  39
    James C. Russell (2012). Do Invasive Species Cause Damage? Yes. BioScience 61:501-502.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  5
    Jeffrey Sanford Russell (2015). Temporary Safety Hazards. Noûs 49 (3).
    The Epistemic Objection says that certain theories of time imply that it is impossible to know which time is absolutely present. Standard presentations of the Epistemic Objection are elliptical—and some of the most natural premises one might fill in to complete the argument end up leading to radical skepticism. But there is a way of filling in the details which avoids this problem, using epistemic safety. The new version has two interesting upshots. First, while Ross Cameron alleges that the Epistemic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  5
    J. S. Russell (2013). Is There a Normatively Distinctive Concept of Cheating in Sport (or Anywhere Else)? Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):1-21.
    This paper argues that for the purposes of any sort of serious discussion about immoral conduct in sport very little is illuminated by claiming that the conduct in question is cheating. In fact, describing some behavior as cheating is typically little more than expressing strong, but thoroughly vague and imprecise, moral disapproval or condemnation of another person or institution about a wide and ill-defined range of improper advantage-seeking behavior. Such expressions of disapproval fail to distinguish cheating from many other types (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  1
    James A. Russell (2009). Emotion, Core Affect, and Psychological Construction. Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1259-1283.
  19.  57
    J. N. Wright, A. E. Taylor, John Laird, S. R., F. C. S. Schiller, H. F. Hallett, J. L. Russell, S. S., A. C. Ewing, O. de Selincourt, E. J. Thomas & R. J. (1927). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 36 (144):500-524.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Trisha Greenhalgh & Jill Russell (2009). Evidence-Based Policymaking: A Critique. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):304-318.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  46
    Sherri C. Widen & James A. Russell (2010). Descriptive and Prescriptive Definitions of Emotion. Emotion Review 2 (4):377-378.
    Izard (2010) did not seek a descriptive definition of emotion—one that describes the concept as it is used by ordinary folk. Instead, he surveyed scientists’ prescriptive definitions—ones that prescribe how the concept should be used in theories of emotion. That survey showed a lack of agreement today and thus raised doubts about emotion as a useful scientific concept.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  13
    James Russell (2004). What is Language Development?: Rationalist, Empiricist, and Pragmatist Approaches to the Acquisition of Syntax. OUP Oxford.
    Language development is one of the major battle grounds within the humanities and sciences. This book presents, for the first time, an impartial account of the three dominant theories of language development. Written to be accessible for those within developmental psychology, philosophy, and linguistics, the book provides the reader with the information they need in order make up their own mind about this much debated issue.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  23.  6
    Jeffrey Sanford Russell (forthcoming). Indefinite Divisibility. Inquiry:1-25.
    Some hold that the lesson of Russell’s paradox and its relatives is that mathematical reality does not form a ‘definite totality’ but rather is ‘indefinitely extensible’. There can always be more sets than there ever are. I argue that certain contact puzzles are analogous to Russell’s paradox this way: they similarly motivate a vision of physical reality as iteratively generated. In this picture, the divisions of the continuum into smaller parts are ‘potential’ rather than ‘actual’. Besides the intrinsic interest of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  3
    James Russell, Dean Alexis & Nicola Clayton (2010). Episodic Future Thinking in 3- to 5-Year-Old Children: The Ability to Think of What Will Be Needed From a Different Point of View. [REVIEW] Cognition 114 (1):56-71.
    Assessing children's episodic future thinking by having them select items for future use may be assessing their functional reasoning about the future rather than their future episodic thinking. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, we capitalised on the fact that episodic cognition necessarily has a spatial format (Clayton & Russell, 2009; Hassabis & Maguire, 2007). Accordingly, we asked children of 3, 4, and 5 to chose items they would need to play a game (blow football) from the opposite side (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  6
    J. S. Russell (1997). The Concept of a Call in Baseball. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):21-37.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  26.  13
    J. S. Russell (2012). The Ideal Fan or Good Fans? Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (1):16-30.
    This paper is a response to Nicholas Dixon's defence of the moderate partisan as the ideal fan of team sports. For Dixon, the moderate partisan is someone who combines a partisan fan's loyalty for a particular team with a purist fan's desire to see fair and skilful play by all participants. My aim is to argue that there is no ideal fan of team sports. In particular, there is nothing specially commendable about the moderate partisan's loyalty that justifies the claim (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  45
    Jeffrey Sanford Russell (2014). On Where Things Could Be. Philosophy of Science 81 (1).
    Some philosophers respond to Leibniz’s “shift” argument against absolute space by appealing to antihaecceitism about possible worlds, using David Lewis’s counterpart theory. But separated from Lewis’s distinctive system, it is difficult to understand what this doctrine amounts to or how it bears on the Leibnizian argument. In fact, the best way of making sense of the relevant kind of antihaecceitism concedes the main point of the Leibnizian argument, pressing us to consider alternative spatiotemporal metaphysics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. James Russell (1984). Explaining Mental Life: Some Philosophical Issues in Psychology. St. Martin's Press.
  29.  8
    N. S. Clayton, James Russell & Anthony Dickinson (2009). Are Animals Stuck in Time or Are They Chronesthetic Creatures? Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):59-71.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  8
    James Russell (1980). Action From Knowledge and Conditioned Behaviour. Part Two: Criteria for Epistemic Behaviour. Behaviorism 5 (2):133-148.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  4
    J. S. Russell (2007). Children and Dangerous Sport and Recreation. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):176-193.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  32.  19
    James Russell (2007). Controlling Core Knowledge: Conditions for the Ascription of Intentional States to Self and Others by Children. Synthese 159 (2):167 - 196.
    The ascription of intentional states to the self involves knowledge, or at least claims to knowledge. Armed with the working definition of knowledge as 'the ability to do things, or refrain from doing things, or believe, or want, or doubt things, for reasons that are facts' [Hyman, J. Philos. Quart. 49:432—451], I sketch a simple competence model of acting and believing from knowledge and when knowledge is defeated by un-experienced changes of state. The model takes the form of three concentric (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33.  3
    J. S. Russell (2011). Limitations of the Sport-Law Comparison. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):254-272.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  58
    Jeffrey Sanford Russell (2015). Possible Worlds and the Objective World. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (2):389-422.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  7
    J. S. Russell (2004). Taking Umpiring Seriously: How Philosophy Can Help Umpires Make the Right Calls. In Eric Bronson (ed.), Baseball and Philosophy. Open Court 87--103.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  4
    J. A. Russell (1912). The Eugenic Appeal in Moral Education. The Eugenics Review 4 (2):136.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  73
    James A. Russell (2005). Emotion in Human Consciousness is Built on Core Affect. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):26-42.
    This article explores the idea that Core Affect provides the emotional quality to any conscious state. Core Affect is the neurophysiological state always accessible as simply feeling good or bad, energized or enervated, even if it is not always the focus of attention. Core Affect, alone or more typically combined with other psychological processes, is found in the experiences of feeling, mood and emotion, including the subjective experiences of fear, anger and other so-called basic emotions which are commonly thought to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  5
    James Russell (1981). Action From Knowledge and Conditioned Behaviour. Part Three: The Human Case. Behaviorism 9 (1):107-126.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  11
    James Russell (1980). Action From Knowledge and Conditioned Behaviour. Part One: The Stratification of Behaviour. Behaviorism 8 (1):87-98.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  11
    J. Michael Russell (1973). Saying, Feeling, and Self-Deception. Behaviorism 1 (2):77-86.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. James Russell (1996). Agency its Role in Mental Development. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  42.  4
    Josephine Russell (2002). Moral Consciousness in a Community of Inquiry. Journal of Moral Education 31 (2):141-153.
    In this qualitative research study moral consciousness was examined in a chosen sample of two groups of children, aged 7-8 and 11-12 years, respectively. An emergent research design was used, which meant analysing the data continually so that significant meanings could emerge in the process. What was important in the study could not be predetermined, but evolved from the categories of meaning that I derived inductively from the data. The results show that children have a strong moral sense and this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  5
    James A. Russell (2008). In Defense of a Psychological Constructionist Account of Emotion: Reply to Zachar. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):423-429.
    Comment on an article by Peter Zachar An account of emotion must include categories and dimensions. Categories because humans categorize reality, and a person's categorization of their own state influences aspects of that state. Dimensions because humans are always in some state of Core Affect, which varies by degree along dimensions of valence and activation . In Psychological Construction, Core Affect and a host of other "components" are separate on-going processes, always in some pattern. Occasionally the pattern resembles a prototype (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  1
    James A. Russell (1987). Comments on Articles by Frijda and by Conway and Bekerian. Cognition and Emotion 1 (2):193-197.
  45.  0
    James Russell (1995). At Two with Nature: Agency and the Development of Self-World Dualism. In Jose Luis Bermudez, Anthony J. Marcel & Naomi M. Eilan (eds.), The Body and the Self. MIT Press 127--151.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  46.  4
    J. S. Russell (2015). Resilience. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (2):159-183.
    This paper argues that human psychological resilience is a central virtue in sport and in human life generally. Despite its importance, it is an overlooked virtue in philosophy of sport and classical and contemporary virtue theory. The phenomenon of human resilience has received a great deal of attention recently in other quarters, however. There is a large and instructive empirical psychological literature on resilience, but connections to virtue theory are rarely drawn and there is no agreement about what the concept (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  2
    James Russell (1987). “Can We Say …?” Children's Understanding of Intensionality. Cognition 25 (3):289-308.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  3
    John Russell (1909). Can the School Prepare for Parenthood? The Eugenics Review 1 (2):77.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  3
    J. Russell (1911). The Adolescent. The Eugenics Review 3 (2):177.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  36
    James Russell & Robert Hanna (2012). A Minimalist Approach to the Development of Episodic Memory. Mind and Language 27 (1):29-54.
    Episodic memory is usually regarded in a Conceptualist light, in the sense of its being dependent upon the grasp of concepts directly relevant to the act of episodic recollection itself, such as a concept of past times and of the self as an experiencer. Given this view, its development is typically timed as being in the early school-age years (Perner, 2001; Tulving, 2005). We present a minimalist, Non-Conceptualist approach in opposition to this view, but one that also exists in clear (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 172