Search results for 'J. S. Busby' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Katharina E. Kinder, Linden J. Ball & Jerry S. Busby (2007). Ubiquitous Technologies, Cultural Logics and Paternalism in Industrial Workplaces. Poiesis and Praxis 5 (3-4):265-290.score: 1170.0
    Ubiquitous computing is a new kind of computing where devices enhance everyday artefacts and open up previously inaccessible situations for data capture. ‘Technology paternalism’ has been suggested by Spiekermann and Pallas (Poiesis & Praxis: Int J Technol Assess Ethics Sci 4(1):6–18, 2006) as a concept to gauge the social and ethical impact of these new technologies. In this article we explore this concept in the specific setting of UK road maintenance and construction. Drawing on examples from our qualitative fieldwork we (...)
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  2. J. S. Busby & M. Coeckelbergh (2003). The Social Ascription of Obligations to Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (3):363-376.score: 960.0
    Discovering obligations that are ascribed to them by others is potentially an important element in the development of the moral imagination of engineers. Moral imagination cannot reasonably be developed by contemplating oneself and one’s task alone: there must be some element of discovering the expectations of people one could put at risk. In practice it may be impossible to meet ascribed obligations if they are completely general and allow no exceptions — for example if they demand an unlimited duty to (...)
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  3. J. S. Busby & P. A. Lloyd (2003). 'Things That Went Well-No Serious Deaths or Injuries': Ethical Reasoning in Normal Engineering Design Processes. Science and Engineering Ethics 9:503-516.score: 870.0
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  4. W. Baird, R. Jackson, H. Ford, N. Evangelou, M. Busby, P. Bull & J. Zajicek (2009). Holding Personal Information in a Disease-Specific Register: The Perspectives of People with Multiple Sclerosis and Professionals on Consent and Access. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):92-96.score: 450.0
    Objective: To determine the views of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and professionals in relation to confidentiality, consent and access to data within a proposed MS register in the UK. Design: Qualitative study using focus groups (10) and interviews (13). Setting: England and Northern Ireland. Participants: 68 people with MS, neurologists, MS nurses, health services management professionals, researchers, representatives from pharmaceutical companies and social care professionals. Results: People with MS expressed open and altruistic views towards the use of their personal (...)
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