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  1. J. S. Taylor (2014). Organs: Tradable, but Not Necessarily Inheritable. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):62-62.
    Teck Chuan Voo and Soren Holm argue that “organs should be inheritable if they were to be socially and legally recognised as tradable property.”1 To support this view they first observe that “…legal recognition of objects as property… opens up the possibility of the legal recognition of the survival of the property rights and their inheritability after the death of the source/owner, even if those rights are intimately bound with the person.”1 They also note that if organs are tradable property (...)
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  2. J. S. Taylor (2013). Habilitation, Health, and Agency: A Framework for Basic JusticeBy Lawrence C. Becker. Analysis 73 (3):591-592.
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  3. J. S. Taylor (2012). Bioethics and the Metaphysics of Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (5):417-424.
    In recent years there has been a tremendous resurgence in philosophical interest in the metaphysical issues surrounding death. 1 This is, perhaps, not surprising. Not only are these issues of perennial theoretical appeal but they also have significant practical importance for many debates within applied ethics—especially bioethics. 2 And the bioethical debates that these issues are relevant to happen to be some of those that are currently the most pressing, having risen to prominence either as a result of contemporary public (...)
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  4. J. S. Taylor (2012). Titmuss Revisited: From Tax Credits to Markets. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):461-462.
    Petersen and Lippert-Rasmussen argue that persons who decide to be organ donors should receive a tax break, and then defend their view against eight possible objections. However, they misunderstand the Titmuss-style concerns that might be raised against their proposal. This does not mean that it should be rejected, but, instead, that when it is reconfigured to meet the Titmuss-style charges against it, they should support legalizing markets in human organs rather than merely offering tax breaks to encourage their donation.
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  5. J. S. Taylor (2012). The Value of Autonomy and the Right to Self-Medication. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):587-588.
    In ‘Three Arguments Against Prescription Requirements’, Jessica Flanigan argues that ‘prescription drug laws violate patients' rights to self-medication’ and that patients ‘have rights to self-medication for the same reasons they have rights to refuse medical treatment according to the doctrine of informed consent , claiming that the strongest of these reasons is grounded on the value of autonomy. However, close examination of the moral value of autonomy shows that rather than being the strongest justification for the DIC, respect for the (...)
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  6. J. S. Taylor (2011). Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will, by John Martin Fischer. Mind 119 (476):1165-1168.
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  7. J. S. Taylor (2009). Autonomy and Organ Sales, Revisited. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (6):632-648.
    In this paper I develop and defend my arguments in favor of the moral permissibility of a legal market for human body parts in response to the criticisms that have been leveled at them by Paul M. Hughes and Samuel J. Kerstein.
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  8. J. S. Taylor (2008). Market Incentives and Health Care Reform. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (5):498-514.
    It is generally agreed that the current methods of providing health care in the West need to be reformed. Such reforms must operate within the practical limitations to which any future system of health care will be subject. These limitations include an increase in the demand for costly end-of-life health care coupled with a reduction in the proportion of the population who are working taxpayers (and hence a reduction in the proportionate amount of health care funding that can be secured (...)
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  9. J. S. Taylor (2007). A "Queen of Hearts" Trial of Organ Markets: Why Scheper-Hughes's Objections to Markets in Human Organs Fail. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):201-204.
    Nancy Scheper-Hughes is one of the most prominent critics of markets in human organs. Unfortunately, Scheper-Hughes rejects the view that markets should be used to solve the current shortage of transplant organs without engaging with the arguments in favour of them. Scheper-Hughes’s rejection of such markets is of especial concern, given her influence over their future, for she holds, among other positions, the status of an adviser to the World Health Organization on issues related to global transplantation. Given her influence, (...)
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  10. J. S. Taylor (2006). Black Markets, Transplant Kidneys and Interpersonal Coercion. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):698-701.
    One of the most common arguments against legalising markets in human kidneys is that this would result in the widespread misuse that is present in the black market becoming more prevalent. In particular, it is argued that if such markets were to be legalised, this would lead to an increase in the number of people being coerced into selling their kidneys. Moreover, such coercion would occur even if markets in kidneys were regulated, for those subject to such coercion would not (...)
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  11. J. S. Taylor (ed.) (2004). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contermporary Philosophy. Cambridge.
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