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Julian Savulescu [122]J. Savulescu [52]J. Savulescu [1]
  1. L. De Crespigny & Savulescu, J., Pregnant Women with Fetal Abnormalities: The Forgotten People in the Abortion Debate.
    of (from Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics) Medical Journal of Australia, 188 (2) 100 - 102.
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  2. Naylor, E., Wood, D. & J. Savulescu, Neuroscience, Neuroethics and the Law, Student British Medical Journal, February 2008.
    of (from Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics).
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  3. Julian Savulescu, Solving the Stem Cell and Cloning Puzzle.
    , from Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics Julian Savulescu’s comment on the ethics of using embryos for medical research. To be published in The Age.
     
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  4. L. de Crespigny & J. Savulescu (forthcoming). Homebirth and the Future Child. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  5. Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu (forthcoming). The Medicalization of Love. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-19.
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  6. Les Halpin, Julian Savulescu, Kevin Talbot, Martin Turner & Paul Talman (forthcoming). Improving Access to Medicines: Empowering Patients in the Quest to Improve Treatment for Rare Lethal Diseases. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101427.
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  7. Hannah Maslen, Tom Douglas, Roi Cohen Kadosh, Neil Levy & Julian Savulescu (forthcoming). Do-It-Yourself Brain Stimulation: A Regulatory Model. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101692.
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  8. I. Persson & J. Savulescu (forthcoming). Reply to Commentators on Unfit for the Future. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  9. Ingmar Persson & Julian Savulescu (forthcoming). Summary of Unfit for the Future. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  10. Julian Savulescu (forthcoming). The Case for Creating Human-Nonhuman Cell Lines. Bioethics Forum.
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  11. Mark Sheehan, Claire Timlin, Ken Peach, Ariella Binik, Wilson Puthenparampil, Mark Lodge, Sean Kehoe, Michael Brada, Neil Burnet, Steve Clarke, Adrian Crellin, Michael Dunn, Piero Fossati, Steve Harris, Michael Hocken, Tony Hope, Jonathan Ives, Tadashi Kamada, Alex John London, Robert Miller, Michael Parker, Madelon Pijls-Johannesma, Julian Savulescu, Susan Short, Loane Skene, Hirohiko Tsujii, Jeffrey Tuan & Charles Weijer (forthcoming). Position Statement on Ethics, Equipoise and Research on Charged Particle Radiation Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101290.
    The use of charged-particle radiation therapy (CPRT) is an increasingly important development in the treatment of cancer. One of the most pressing controversies about the use of this technology is whether randomised controlled trials are required before this form of treatment can be considered to be the treatment of choice for a wide range of indications. Equipoise is the key ethical concept in determining which research studies are justified. However, there is a good deal of disagreement about how this concept (...)
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  12. Jacob Gipson, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2014). Attitudes of Lay People to Withdrawal of Treatment in Brain Damaged Patients. Neuroethics 7 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundWhether patients in the vegetative state (VS), minimally conscious state (MCS) or the clinically related locked-in syndrome (LIS) should be kept alive is a matter of intense controversy. This study aimed to examine the moral attitudes of lay people to these questions, and the values and other factors that underlie these attitudes.MethodOne hundred ninety-nine US residents completed a survey using the online platform Mechanical Turk, comprising demographic questions, agreement with treatment withdrawal from each of the conditions, agreement with a series (...)
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  13. I. Persson & J. Savulescu (2014). Should Moral Bioenhancement Be Compulsory? Reply to Vojin Rakic. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):251-252.
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  14. Ingmar Persson & Julian Savulescu (2014). Against Fetishism About Egalitarianism and in Defense of Cautious Moral Bioenhancement. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (4):39-42.
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  15. J. Savulescu (2014). A Simple Solution to the Puzzles of End of Life? Voluntary Palliated Starvation. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):110-113.
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  16. J. Savulescu (2014). Challenging Accepted Ethical Beliefs. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):71-72.
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  17. G. Owen Schaefer, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2014). Autonomy and Enhancement. Neuroethics 7 (2):123-136.
    Some have objected to human enhancement on the grounds that it violates the autonomy of the enhanced. These objections, however, overlook the interesting possibility that autonomy itself could be enhanced. How, exactly, to enhance autonomy is a difficult problem due to the numerous and diverse accounts of autonomy in the literature. Existing accounts of autonomy enhancement rely on narrow and controversial conceptions of autonomy. However, we identify one feature of autonomy common to many mainstream accounts: reasoning ability. Autonomy can then (...)
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  18. G. Owen Schaefer & Julian Savulescu (2014). The Ethics of Producing In Vitro Meat. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):188-202.
    The prospect of consumable meat produced in a laboratory setting without the need to raise and slaughter animals is both realistic and exciting. Not only could such in vitro meat become popular due to potential cost savings, but it also avoids many of the ethical and environmental problems with traditional meat productions. However, as with any new technology, in vitro meat is likely to face some detractors. We examine in detail three potential objections: 1) in vitro meat is disrespectful, either (...)
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  19. Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu (2014). A Costly Separation Between Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Intensive Care. Bioethics 28 (3):127-137.
    Ethical analyses, professional guidelines and legal decisions support the equivalence thesis for life-sustaining treatment: if it is ethical to withhold treatment, it would be ethical to withdraw the same treatment. In this paper we explore reasons why the majority of medical professionals disagree with the conclusions of ethical analysis. Resource allocation is considered by clinicians to be a legitimate reason to withhold but not to withdraw intensive care treatment. We analyse five arguments in favour of non-equivalence, and find only relatively (...)
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  20. Ben Bambery, Michael Selgelid, Hannah Maslen, Andrew J. Pollard & Julian Savulescu (2013). The Case for Mandatory Flu Vaccination of Children. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (9):38 - 40.
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  21. Alastair V. Campbell, Raanan Gillon, Julian Savulescu, John Harris, Soren Holm, H. Martyn Evans, David Greaves, Jane Macnaughton, Deborah Kirklin & Sue Eckstein (2013). The Journal of Medical Ethics and Medical Humanities: Offsprings of the London Medical Group. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):667-668.
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  22. Thomas Douglas, Russell Powell & Julian Savulescu (2013). Is the Creation of Artificial Life Morally Significant? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):688-696.
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  23. Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu (2013). If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):3-17.
    ?Love hurts??as the saying goes?and a certain amount of pain and difficulty in intimate relationships is unavoidable. Sometimes it may even be beneficial, since adversity can lead to personal growth, self-discovery, and a range of other components of a life well-lived. But other times, love can be downright dangerous. It may bind a spouse to her domestic abuser, draw an unscrupulous adult toward sexual involvement with a child, put someone under the insidious spell of a cult leader, and even inspire (...)
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  24. Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2013). Normal Human Variation: Refocussing the Enhancement Debate. Bioethics 28 (2):n/a-n/a.
    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in (...)
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  25. Ingmar Persson & Julian Savulescu (2013). Getting Moral Enhancement Right: The Desirability of Moral Bioenhancement. Bioethics 27 (3):124-131.
    We respond to a number of objections raised by John Harris in this journal to our argument that we should pursue genetic and other biological means of morally enhancing human beings (moral bioenhancement). We claim that human beings now have at their disposal means of wiping out life on Earth and that traditional methods of moral education are probably insufficient to achieve the moral enhancement required to ensure that this will not happen. Hence, we argue, moral bioenhancement should be sought (...)
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  26. Jonathan Pugh, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2013). Cohen's Conservatism and Human Enhancement. Journal of Ethics 17 (4):331-354.
    In an intriguing essay, G. A. Cohen has defended a conservative bias in favour of existing value. In this paper, we consider whether Cohen’s conservatism raises a new challenge to the use of human enhancement technologies. We develop some of Cohen’s suggestive remarks into a new line of argument against human enhancement that, we believe, is in several ways superior to existing objections. However, we shall argue that on closer inspection, Cohen’s conservatism fails to offer grounds for a strong sweeping (...)
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  27. J. Savulescu (2013). Elective Ventilation and Interests. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):129-129.
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  28. J. Savulescu (2013). Just Dying: The Futility of Futility. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):583-584.
    I argue that Brierley et al are wrong to claim that parents who request futile treatment are acting against the interests of their child. A better ethical ground for withholding or withdrawing life-prolonging treatment is not that it is in the interests of the patient to die, but rather on grounds of the limitation of resources and the requirements of distributive justice. Put simply, not all treatment that might be in a person's interests must ethically be provided.
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  29. Julian Savulescu (2013). Abortion, Infanticide and Allowing Babies to Die, 40 Years On. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):257-259.
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  30. Julian Savulescu (2013). A Liberal Consequentialist Approach to Regulation of Cognitive Enhancers. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):53-55.
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  31. Julian Savulescu (2013). Male Circumcision and the Enhancement Debate: Harm Reduction, Not Prohibition. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):416-417.
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  32. Julian Savulescu (2013). Rational Evolution. The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):67-73.
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  33. Julian Savulescu & Robert Sparrow (2013). Making Better Babies: Pro and Con-Presented by the Monash University Centre for Human Bioethics, Tuesday 2 October, 6.00-7.30 Pm. [REVIEW] Monash Bioethics Review 31 (1):36-59.
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  34. Sylvia Terbeck, Guy Kahane, Sarah McTavish, Julian Savulescu, Neil Levy, Miles Hewstone & Philip Cowen (2013). Beta Adrenergic Blockade Reduces Utilitarian Judgement. Biological Psychology 92 (2):323-328.
    Noradrenergic pathways are involved in mediating the central and peripheral effects of physiological arousal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in moral decision-making. We studied the effects in healthy volunteers of propranolol (a noradrenergic beta-adrenoceptor antagonist) on moral judgement in a set of moral dilemmas pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Propranolol (40 mg orally) (...)
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  35. Katja Wiech, Guy Kahane, Nicholas Shackel, Miguel Farias, Julian Savulescu & Irene Tracey (2013). Cold or Calculating? Reduced Activity in the Subgenual Cingulate Cortex Reflects Decreased Emotional Aversion to Harming in Counterintuitive Utilitarian Judgment. Cognition 126 (3):364-372.
    Recent research on moral decision-making has suggested that many common moral judgments are based on immediate intuitions. However, some individuals arrive at highly counterintuitive utilitarian conclusions about when it is permissible to harm other individuals. Such utilitarian judgments have been attributed to effortful reasoning that has overcome our natural emotional aversion to harming others. Recent studies, however, suggest that such utilitarian judgments might also result from a decreased aversion to harming others, due to a deficit in empathic concern and social (...)
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  36. D. Wilkinson & J. Savulescu (2013). Is It Better to Be Minimally Conscious Than Vegetative? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):557-558.
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  37. Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu (2012). Natural Selection, Childrearing, and the Ethics of Marriage (and Divorce): Building a Case for the Neuroenhancement of Human Relationships. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):561-587.
    We argue that the fragility of contemporary marriages—and the corresponding high rates of divorce—can be explained (in large part) by a three-part mismatch: between our relationship values, our evolved psychobiological natures, and our modern social, physical, and technological environment. “Love drugs” could help address this mismatch by boosting our psychobiologies while keeping our values and our environment intact. While individual couples should be free to use pharmacological interventions to sustain and improve their romantic connection, we suggest that they may have (...)
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  38. Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2012). The Concept of Harm and the Significance of Normality. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (3):318.
    Many believe that severe intellectual impairment, blindness or dying young amount to serious harm and disadvantage. It is also increasingly denied that it matters, from a moral point of view, whether something is biologically normal to humans. We show that these two claims are in serious tension. It is hard explain how, if we do not ascribe some deep moral significance to human nature or biological normality, we could distinguish severe intellectual impairment or blindness from the vast list of seemingly (...)
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  39. Guy Kahane, Katja Wiech, Nicholas Shackel, Miguel Farias, Julian Savulescu & Irene Tracey (2012). The Neural Basis of Intuitive and Counterintuitive Moral Judgement. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 7 (4):393-402.
    Neuroimaging studies on moral decision-making have thus far largely focused on differences between moral judgments with opposing utilitarian (well-being maximizing) and deontological (duty-based) content. However, these studies have investigated moral dilemmas involving extreme situations, and did not control for two distinct dimensions of moral judgment: whether or not it is intuitive (immediately compelling to most people) and whether it is utilitarian or deontological in content. By contrasting dilemmas where utilitarian judgments are counterintuitive with dilemmas in which they are intuitive, we (...)
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  40. Ingmar Persson & Julian Savulescu (2012). Moral Enhancement, Freedom and the God Machine. The Monist 95 (3):399-421.
  41. Ingmar Persson & Julian Savulescu (2012). Unfit for the Future: The Need for Moral Enhancement. Oxford University Press.
    Unfit for the Future argues that the future of our species depends on our urgently finding ways to bring about radical enhancement of the moral aspects of our own human nature. We have rewritten our own moral agenda by the drastic changes we have made to the conditions of life on earth. Advances in technology enable us to exercise an influence that extends all over the world and far into the future. But our moral psychology lags behind and leaves us (...)
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  42. Russell Powell, Steve Clarke & Julian Savulescu (2012). An Ethical and Prudential Argument for Prioritizing the Reduction of Parasite-Stress in the Allocation of Health Care Resources. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):90-91.
    The link between parasite-stress and complex psychological dispositions implies that the social, political, and economic benefits likely to flow from public health interventions that reduce rates of non-zoonotic infectious disease are far greater than have traditionally been thought. We sketch a prudential and ethical argument for increasing public health resources globally and redistributing these to focus on the alleviation of parasite-stress in human populations.
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  43. Russell Powell, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2012). Evolution, Genetic Engineering, and Human Enhancement. Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):439-458.
    There are many ways that biological theory can inform ethical discussions of genetic engineering and biomedical enhancement. In this essay, we highlight some of these potential contributions, and along the way provide a synthetic overview of the papers that comprise this special issue. We begin by comparing and contrasting genetic engineering with programs of selective breeding that led to the domestication of plants and animals, and we consider how genetic engineering differs from other contemporary biotechnologies such as embryo selection. We (...)
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  44. Julian Savulescu & Ingmar Persson (2012). Moral Enhancement. Philosophy Now 91:6-8.
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  45. Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu (2012). Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation. Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways (...)
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  46. Enhancing Human Capacities, Julian Savulescu, Ruud ter Meulen & Guy Kahane (2011). A Legitimate Goal of Medicine? In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities.
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  47. Enhancing Human Capacities, Julian Savulescu, Ruud ter Meulen & Guy Kahane (2011). Bennett Foddy. In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities.
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  48. Enhancing Human Capacities, Julian Savulescu, Ruud ter Meulen & Guy Kahane (2011). Gaia Barazzetti and Massimo Reichlin. In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities.
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  49. Enhancing Human Capacities, Julian Savulescu, Ruud ter Meulen & Guy Kahane (2011). Hidde J. Haisma. In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities.
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  50. Enhancing Human Capacities, Julian Savulescu, Ruud ter Meulen & Guy Kahane (2011). Thomas Douglas. In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities.
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