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John Shand [68]J. Shand [10]
  1. John Shand (2011). How Believing in an AFTERLIFE Can RUIN Your Life. Philosophy Now 84:21-21.
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  2.  7
    John Shand (1993). Philosophy and Philosophers: An Introduction to Western Philosophy. Penguin Books.
    First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  3.  14
    John Shand (2016). Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing. Think 15 (43):103-115.
    The answer to the question of why there is Something rather than Nothing is that there has to be Something and that Nothing is impossible. There cannot not be Something so there cannot be Nothing. The paper justifies this conclusion, while also explaining why we might believe there may be Nothing. In the course of this, the so-called subtraction-argument is shown to be inadequate and question-begging.
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  4.  30
    John Shand (2007). Fear of the Future. Think 5 (15):45-53.
    Here is an unusual and intriguing philosophical response to current concerns about global warming.
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  5.  48
    John Shand (2008). Futile Definitions. Think 6 (17-18):129-137.
    Settling definitions is often seen as a central tool for clarifying concepts, and answering questions. Examples might be , or . A common way of answering such questions is by formulating necessary and sufficient conditions for a thing to be of a certain sort. It is this form of real definition that is of concern here.
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  6.  44
    J. Shand (2010). Taking Offence. Analysis 70 (4):703-706.
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  7.  11
    John Shand (2011). Love As If. Essays in Philosophy 12 (1):2.
    The primary focus here is romantic love, but it may be applied to other cases of love such as those within a family. The first issue is whether love is a non-rational occurrence leading to a state of affairs to which the normative constrains of reason do not apply. If one assumes that reasons are relevant to determining love, then the second issue is the manner in which love is and should be reasonable and governed by the indications of reason. (...)
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  8.  5
    John Shand (2015). Free Will and Subject. Polish Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):51-70.
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  9.  42
    John Shand (2004). Thought Against Defeat. The Philosophers' Magazine 25 (25):48-49.
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  10.  45
    John Shand (2010). A Refutation of the Existence of God. Think 9 (26):61 - 79.
    The following argument presents a refutation of the existence of God under a certain description, which, it will be maintained, is the only description that most traditional monotheists could accept. Therefore, either God, as defined by traditional monotheism, does not exist or something that might be called ‘God’ exists, but would not be acceptable to monotheism as truly being God. Either way, God does not exist. 1.
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  11.  41
    John Shand (2008). Sandis in Defence of Four Socratic Doctrines. Think 6 (17-18):103-107.
    John Shand also critically discusses Sandis' preceding paper.
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  12.  8
    John Shand (forthcoming). The Cambridge Companion to Hume's Treatise. Philosophical Quarterly:pqv103.
  13.  34
    John Shand (1986). Grayling, Feyerabend and the Constancy of Sense. Analysis 46 (4):211 - 212.
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  14.  15
    John Shand (2009). Limits, Perspectives, and Thought. Philosophy 84 (3):429-435.
    Imagine a universe without human beings. Now imagine a universe devoid of any creatures like human beings, beings who could think about the universe and in so doing consider it as divided up into different kinds of things that could be objects of understanding. Now imagine – this is harder – your not being there, or anyone else, to imagine such a universe. Next think about setting about describing in physical laws such a universe in line with a completist physicalist (...)
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  15.  33
    John Shand (2004). Innate Ideas and Immortality in Descartes and Locke. Locke Studies 4:47-58.
    This paper traces the connections between the assertion or denial of innate ideas, and the possibility of the soul being immortal, in the contrasting cases of Descartes and Locke. Descartes and Locke disagree about whether there are innate ideas and the nature of the soul, but they agree that the soul is immortal. The issue explored is which theory of the mind, Descartes's or Locke's, is in the best position to contend that we to survive death, and indeed exist immortally. (...)
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  16.  26
    John Shand (2003). Thinking Fit. The Philosophers' Magazine 22:56-56.
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  17.  25
    J. Shand (2014). Predictive Mind, Cognition, and Chess. Analysis 74 (2):244-249.
    According to the ambitious Predictive Theory of the Mind the brain generates models that it tests against experience and corrects to makes them evermore probably accurate of encountered experience. It neatly explains why we cannot tickle ourselves. The convincingness of that example is compromised by its essentially non-cognitive nature whereby an explanation not involving predictive models might do just as well. More telling confirmation of the theory is the essentially cognitive phenomenon of our inability to play chess against ourselves. This (...)
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  18.  12
    David Seedhouse & John Shand (1998). Health Care Discourse. Health Care Analysis 6 (3):237-260.
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  19.  21
    John Shand (2003). Cooper Measures Up. The Philosophers' Magazine 24:59-59.
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  20.  10
    John Shand (1997). A Reply to Some Standard Objections to Euthanasia. Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):43-47.
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  21.  19
    J. Shand (2009). Rationality and Moral Theory: How Intimacy Generates Reasons * by Diane Jeske. Analysis 69 (3):578-580.
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  22.  2
    John Shand (2003). A. E. Denham: "Metaphor and Moral Experience". [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 44 (1):78-78.
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  23.  2
    David Seedhouse & John Shand (1998). Health Care Discourse: A Dialogue Concerning the Philosophy of Health Care. Health Care Analysis 6 (3):237-260.
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  24.  11
    John Shand (2012). The Order of Public Reason: A Theory of Freedom And Morality in a Diverse and Bounded World. By Gerald Gaus. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2011, Xx + 621 Pp., £55. ISBN: 9780521868563. [REVIEW] Philosophy 87 (02):315-318.
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  25.  10
    John Shand (2005). Existentialism. Philosophy Now 53:44-46.
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  26.  5
    John Shand (2014). Can Animals Be Moral? Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):205-207.
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  27.  5
    John Shand (1995). The Place of Emotion in Argument. Philosophical Books 36 (2):114-116.
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  28.  10
    J. Shand (1998). Ethics and Extermination: Reflections on Nazi Genocide. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):424-424.
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  29.  8
    J. Shand (1998). Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (3):208-209.
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  30. John Shand (2012). The Degradation of Human Relations Through Instant and Ever-Present Communication, and the New Etiquette It Requires. Journal of Philosophy of Life 2 (1):92-101.
    The new possibility opened up by recent technology of ever-present, unbroken and potentially instant communication has had a fundamental effect on human relations, presenting us with modes of communication unprecedented in human history. Although there are some good effects, one of the bad effects is the potential for degradation in human relations in respect of the capacity for, and habit of, empathy, understanding and thoughtfulness between individuals, and an undermining of the expectation of reasonable anticipation in relation to others and (...)
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  31.  11
    John Shand (2007). How to Live? Philosophy 82 (2):347-348.
    This paper is not about truth but about consistency. Pointing to inconsistency would be a dry worthless exercise were there not people who are inconsistent in the specific way described and for whom such inconsistency matters. There are those who tell us that life has no value and is pointless, that it is ‘absurd’, and yet that it matters how we live our lives; in particular that we ought to square up to the truth that life has no value and (...)
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  32.  1
    John Shand (2015). Kant, Respect, and Hypothetical Acts. Philosophy 90 (3):505-518.
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  33.  4
    John Shand (2001). What Problem? Philosophy Now 34:32-34.
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  34.  2
    John Shand (2009). Introduction : An Essay on Philosophy and the Four Philosophical Virtues. In Central Issues of Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
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  35.  2
    John Shand (2008). O Que É a Filosofia? Critica.
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  36.  2
    John Shand (2010). Abhorrence and Justification. Ethical Perspectives 17 (4):515.
    The paper explores a subclass of ethical judgements that are disturbing in that the strength of moral abhorrence generally associated with such judgements is not remotely matched by any rational moral arguments supporting them, and yet we nevertheless appear to think we have no intellectual obligation to change the said ethical judgments so as to accord with the degree of justification. This may stand as a warning that we should be guarded in holding our ethical beliefs since we may not (...)
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  37.  5
    John Shand (2010). Reviews Aporetics: Rational Deliberation in the Face of Inconsistency by Nicholas Rescher Pittsburgh University Press, Pittsburgh Pa, 2009, Pp. IX+161, £23.95. Isbn 9780822943631. [REVIEW] Philosophy 85 (2):307-310.
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  38.  4
    John Shand (2004). Concealment and Exposure. Philosophical Books 45 (3):218-222.
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  39.  1
    John Shand (2007). The Bits In Between. Philosophy Now 61:31-32.
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  40.  1
    John Shand (1996). Philosophy: A Guide Through the Subject. Philosophical Books 37 (3):220-222.
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  41. John Shand (2011). A Valuable And Meaningful Individual Life. Journal of Philosophy of Life 1:74-83.
    Analogously the determinants of the value and meaning of an artwork are fundamentally the same as for an individual life. In both the value and meaning are determined by the parts, in their particularity and in their configuration, as well as, respectively, the subjective contribution of the person whose life it is and whomsoever observes the artwork. However, a person and his life are inextricably linked in a way an observer and an artwork are not. We should learn caution from (...)
     
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  42.  17
    John Shand (2000). Arguing Well. Routledge.
    What are arguments for? How do they work and how do they fail? Arguing Well gives a lucid introduction to the nature of arguments and provides a guide on when to implement reason. It explains the principles of good reasoning, how to apply it and strategies to overcome forces that lead to abandoning it. A simple introduction to symbolic logic gives the reader a useful tool in dealing with arguments. Throughout the book, the long neglected psychological factors that prevent the (...)
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  43. John Shand (2000). Arguing Well. Routledge.
    Arguing Well is a lucid introduction to the nature of good reasoning, how to test and construct successful arguments. It assumes no prior knowledge of logic or philosophy. The book includes an introduction to basic symbolic logic. Arguing Well introduces and explains: * The nature and importance of arguments * What to look for in deciding whether arguments succeed or fail * How to construct good arguments * How to make it more certain that we reason when we should The (...)
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  44. J. Shand (2001). BURLEIGH, M.-The Third Reich. Philosophical Books 42 (3):216-216.
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  45. J. Shand (1998). Brandt, RB-Facts, Values and Morality. Philosophical Books 39:262-263.
     
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  46.  13
    John Shand (ed.) (2009). Central Issues of Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Comprising 20 free-standing chapters written by specialists in their respective fields, _Central Issues of Philosophy_ provides novice readers with the ideal accessible introduction to all of philosophy's core issues. An accessible introduction to the central issues of philosophy Organized around key philosophical issues - ranging from truth, knowledge and reality to free will, ethics and the existence of God Provides beginning students with the information and skills to delve deeper into philosophical fields of study Each chapter is written by an (...)
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  47. John Shand & Gary Lachman (1996). Colin Wilson as Philosopher.
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  48. John Shand (ed.) (2006). Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing.
    About the Author:John Shand is an associate lecturer in philosophy at The Open University.
     
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  49. Shand & John Shand (2005). Central Works of Philosophy, Volume 1: Ancient and Medieval. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    About the Author:John Shand is an associate lecturer in philosophy at The Open University.
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  50. John Shand (2006). Central Works of Philosophy, Volume 4: The Twentieth Century: Moore to Popper. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    About the Author:John Shand is an associate lecturer in philosophy at The Open University.
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