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  1. James Shelley (forthcoming). Eighteenth Century British Aesthetics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. James Shelley (2013). Hume and the Joint Verdict of True Judges. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (2):145-153.
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  3. John C. Shelley (2012). Hannah's Child: A Theologian's Memoir (Review). Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 32 (2):226-227.
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  4. Michael Watkins & James Shelley (2012). Response-Dependence About Aesthetic Value. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (3):338-352.
    The dominant view about the nature of aesthetic value holds it to be response-dependent. We believe that the dominance of this view owes largely to some combination of the following prevalent beliefs: 1 The belief that challenges brought against response-dependent accounts in other areas of philosophy are less challenging when applied to response-dependent accounts of aesthetic value. 2 The belief that aesthetic value is instrumental and that response-dependence about aesthetic value alone accommodates this purported fact. 3 The belief that response-dependence (...)
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  5. J. Shelley (2011). Hume and the Value of the Beautiful. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):213-222.
    Hume is plausibly interpreted as asserting that an artwork is beautiful if and only if it pleases ideal critics. Jerrold Levinson maintains that Hume's commitment to this biconditional gives rise to a problem that occurs neither to Hume nor to his any of his interpreters—the problem of explaining why you should care what pleases ideal critics if you are not one yourself. I argue that this problem arises only if you hold an empiricist theory of aesthetic value—that is, a theory (...)
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  6. James Shelley (2010). Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume by Costelloe, Timothy M. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):411-413.
  7. James Shelley (2010). Against Value Empiricism in Aesthetics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):707-720.
    Value empiricists in aesthetics claim that we can explain the value of artworks by appeal to the value of the experiences they afford. I raise the question of the value of those experiences. I argue that while there are many values that such experiences might have, none is adequate to explaining the value of the works that afford the experiences. I then turn to defending the alternative to value empiricism, which I dub the object theory . I argue that if (...)
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  8. James Shelley, The Concept of the Aesthetic. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  9. James Shelley, 18th Century British Aesthetics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10. James Shelley (2007). Aesthetics and the World at Large. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):169-183.
    l Carroll, that there is no reason to think that an aesthetic theory of art cannot do justice to art in its relation to the extra-artistic world. My argument depends on a reinterpretation of the aesthetic theory of Francis Hutcheson, according to which Hutcheson does not hold aesthetic perception to be non-epistemic, as Peter Kivy has maintained.
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  11. James Shelley (2004). Hume's Principles of Taste: A Reply to Dickie. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):84-89.
    George Dickie argues that Hume's principles of taste have value-laden properties as their subjects, including those properties we now refer to as ‘aesthetic’. I counter that Hume's principles have value-neutral properties as their subjects, and so exclude those properties we now refer to as ‘aesthetic’. Dickie also argues that Hume's essay on taste provides ‘the conceptual means for recognizing the problem of the interaction of aesthetic properties with other properties of artworks’. I counter that the very passages Dickie takes to (...)
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  12. James Shelley (2003). The Problem of Non-Perceptual Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):363-378.
    Consider the following three propositions: (R) Artworks necessarily have aesthetic properties that are relevant to their appreciation as artworks. (S) Aesthetic properties necessarily depend, at least in part, on properties perceived by means of the five senses. (X) There exist artworks that need not be perceived by means of the five senses to be appreciated as artworks. The independent plausibility and apparent joint inconsistency of these three propositions give rise to what I refer to as ‘the problem of non-perceptual art’. (...)
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  13. James Shelley (2002). The Character and Role of Principles in the Evaluation of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (1):37-51.
    , George Dickie offers an account of artistic principles comprising both a description of their character and a description of the role they play in the evaluation of artworks. According to the former, artistic principles state that certain individual properties of artworks, in isolation from other properties, are always artistic merits; according to the latter, artistic principles serve as premises from which we infer that artworks have artistic merit. I argue not merely that Dickie 's account fails, but that any (...)
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  14. James Shelley (2001). Empiricism: Hutcheson and Hume. In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
  15. J. R. Shelley (1998). Peter Kivy, Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences. Philosophy in Review 18:188-189.
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  16. James R. Shelley (1998). Hume and the Nature of Taste. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (1):29-38.
  17. James Shelley (1995). Rule and Verdict. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):319-320.
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  18. James Shelley (1994). Hume's Double Standard of Taste. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (4):437-445.
  19. P. B. Medawar & Julian H. Shelley (eds.) (1980). Structure in Science and Art: Proceedings of the Third C. H. Boehringer Sohn Symposium Held at Kronberg, Taunus, 2nd-5th May 1979. [REVIEW] Sole Distributors for the Usa and Canada, Elsevier North-Holland.