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Profile: J. Thomas Cook (Rollins College)
  1. J. Thomas Cook, Spinoza's Place in This Century's Anglo-American Philosophy.
    The recently published Cambridge Companion to Spinoza contains a fine essay by Pierre- Francois Moreau on Spinoza’s reception and on his influence during the more than three hundred years that have passed since his death. In Moreau’s twenty-five page article we find a brief paragraph on the novelist George Eliot and half a sentence on Ed Curley. There is not another mention, at all, of any other philosopher from an English-speaking land since the seventeenth century – nothing on how Spinoza’s (...)
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  2. J. Thomas Cook, Spinozistic Themes in Bernard Malamud's the Fixer.
    "No, your honor. I didn't know who or what he was when I first came across the book -- they don't exactly love him in the synagogue, if you've read the story of his life. I found it in a junkyard in a nearby town, paid a kopek, and left cursing myself for wasting money hard to come by. Later I read through a few pages and kept on going as though there were a whirlwind at my back. As I (...)
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  3. J. Thomas Cook (2011). Göttliche Gedanken. Zur Metaphysik der Erkenntnis bei Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza und Leibniz. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):495-496.
    In Göttliche Gedanken (Godly Thoughts), Andreas Schmidt provides an in-depth discussion of the metaphysics of knowledge and of mind in four early-modern rationalists: Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, and Leibniz. His topic overlaps with what is called “philosophy of mind” in contemporary Anglo-American circles, for he is quite interested in the relation between mind and body in these four historical thinkers. But as Schmidt effectively reminds us, the “mind-body problem” looks entirely different when embedded in the conceptual setting of the seventeenth century. (...)
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  4. J. Thomas Cook (2011). Leibniz und Das judentum (review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):378-379.
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  5. J. Thomas Cook (2003). Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):560-561.
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  6. J. Thomas Cook (1995). Did Spinoza Lie to His Landlady? Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 11:15-38.
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  7. J. Thomas Cook (1992). Do Persons Follow From Spinoza's God? The Personalist Forum 8:243-248.
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  8. J. Thomas Cook (1987). Deciding to Believe Without Self-Deception. Journal of Philosophy 84 (August):441-446.
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  9. J. Thomas Cook (1986). Self-Knowledge as Self-Preservation? In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 191--210.