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  1. J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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  2. J. W. Harris (2002). Property and Justice. OUP Oxford.
    When philosophers put forward claims for or against 'property', it is often unclear whether they are talking about the same thing that lawyers mean by 'property'. Likewise, when lawyers appeal to 'justice' in interpreting or criticizing legal rules we do not know if they have in mind something that philosophers would recognize as 'justice'. -/- Bridging the gulf between juristic writing on property and speculations about it appearing in the tradition of western political philosophy, Professor Harris has built from entirely (...)
     
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  3. J. W. Harris (1999). Doctrine, Justice, and Home-Sharing. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 19 (3):421-452.
    This article examines certain aspects of current English doctrine in the light of applied property theory. Two of the problems of home-sharing which the law must address are: When should a claim be sustainable against the party who has legal title? Should such claims be exigible against successors of the title-holder? When statue is silent, three doctrinal streams of case-law are invoked. They concern money-down resulting trust interests, proprietary estoppel claims, and common intention constructive trust interests. The 'just outcome' is (...)
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  4. J. W. Harris (1997). Legal Philosophies. Lexis Nexis.
    Legal Philosophies has been written to provide a clear guide to the main topics in a jurisprudence or legal theory course with the novice in mind. It provides summaries of the pertinent arguments within these topics, and of the views of leading theorists. This new edition takes a look at the emergence of "Critical Legal Studies" and "Feminist Jurisprudence", whilst there are new sections on "Moral Truth" and "Communitarianism" (a revived theoretical approach).
     
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  5. J. W. Harris (1991). Murphy Makes It Eight—Overruling Comes to Negligence. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 11 (3):416-430.
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  6. J. W. Harris (1990). Towards Principles of Overruling—When Should a Final Court of Appeal Second Guess? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 10 (2):135-199.
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  7. S. E. Marshall & J. W. Harris (1981). Law and Legal Science. Philosophical Quarterly 31 (122):89.
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  8. J. W. Harris (1979). Law and Legal Science: An Inquiry Into the Concepts Legal Rule and Legal System. Oxford University Press.
     
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