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J. Whatmough [21]Joshua Whatmough [2]J. R. Whatmough [1]
  1. A. Sommerfelt & J. Whatmough (1967). Thomas A. Sebeok. In Donald C. Hildum (ed.), Language and Thought: An Enduring Problem in Psychology. London,: Van Nostrand, 12--40.
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  2. J. Tate & J. Whatmough (1958). Poetic, Scientific and Other Forms of Discourse. Journal of Hellenic Studies 78:148.
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  3. J. Whatmough (1937). Pre-Roman Gubbio Irene Rosenzweig: Ritual and Cults of Pre-Roman Iguvium. Pp. Viii +152; Plan of Gubbio. (Studies and Documents Edited by K. And S. Lake, IX.) London: Christophers, 1937. Paper, 15s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (05):193-194.
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  4. J. Whatmough (1935). Correspondence. The Classical Review 49 (01):45-.
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  5. H. J. R. & J. R. Whatmough (1934). Orphism. Journal of Hellenic Studies 54:223.
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  6. J. Whatmough (1928). Latin Hinnvlevs Again. The Classical Review 42 (04):127-.
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  7. J. Whatmough (1927). Latin Hinnuleus, Hinulus (?), 'Fawn.'. The Classical Review 41 (05):174-175.
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  8. J. Whatmough (1926). La Letteratura Latina Anteriore All' Influenza Ellenica. By Enrico Cocchia. Three Vols. Vol. I., Pp. X + 264; Vol. II., Pp. Vii + 197; Vol. III., Pp. Xi + 397. Naples: Rondinella and Loffredo, 1924–1925. Vol. I., Lire 12 ; Vol. II., Lire 10; Vol. III., Lire 20. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (01):35-36.
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  9. J. Whatmough (1925). The Alphabet of Vaste. Classical Quarterly 19 (2):68-70.
    All students of Greek epigraphy are familiar with the abecedarium discovered in 1805, ‘prope Bastam ruri quodam dicto Melliche,’ by Luigi Cepolla, amongst whose papers Mommsen found and published it in his Unteritalische Dialekte . Cepolla's copy, though inaccurate, is not so bad, as I hope to show, as has usually been supposed. To be sure, he proposed to interpret an alphabet as a complete inscription, and actually ‘translated’ it! Nor, I think, could it be properly deciphered until more Messapic (...)
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  10. J. Whatmough (1924). An Inscribed 'Raetic' Fibula. Classical Quarterly 18 (3-4):168-.
    Amongst material collected for Part II. of the Pre-Italic Dialects is a plaster cast of a bronze fibula of the ‘simple bow’ or ‘arched’ type found in the neighbourhood of Chur. The cast was sent by Dr. R. von Planta to Professor Conway, who passed it on to me. Study of the inscription, however, which is not, so far as I am aware, hitherto published, shows that it is not, as was thought, Raetic, but Gallo-Latin, as its provenance would suggest.
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  11. J. Whatmough (1924). Spigolature Glottologiche. By Michele Orlando. Two Parts. Part I., Pp. 21; Part II., Pp. Viii + 88. Palermo: Casa Editrice 'L'Attualità,' 1922–1923. Part I., Lire 2.50; Part II., Lire 10. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (3-4):88-.
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  12. J. Whatmough (1923). Note on Pavl. Ex. Fest. 24, 10. Classical Quarterly 17 (3-4):202-.
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  13. J. Whatmough (1922). A New Epithet of Juno. Classical Quarterly 16 (3-4):190-.
    An inscription found in 1912 near Praeneste,1 and now easily accessible in the new edition of Vol. I. of the Corpus of Latin inscriptions , records a dedication in honour of Juno PALOS-CARIA , an epithet previously unknown, and not yet, I believe, satisfactorily explained. Rosenberg's attempted explanation will not secure many adherents, while that of Lommatzsch , who would connect the word with palus -udis, and see an allusion to the ‘paludes Pomptinae,’ involves us in serious, though not insuperable, (...)
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  14. J. Whatmough (1922). Plautus, Cvrcvlio 192. The Classical Review 36 (7-8):166-.
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  15. J. Whatmough (1922). The Iovilae-Dedications From S. Maria di Capua. Classical Quarterly 16 (3-4):181-.
    A Famous group of heraldic dedications, with inscriptions in the Oscan dialect, the iovilae-inscriptions as, in the uncertainty that prevails as to their real character, scholars have generally been content to call them , have long been a standing puzzle to students of the Italic dialects. A visit made in the spring of 1922 to the Museo Nazionale at Naples, where a number of the iovilae are now preserved, provided an opportunity of reconsidering, with the actual objects before me, a (...)
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