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Profile: Jessica Wilson (University of Missouri St. Louis)
Profile: Jessica Wilson (University of Toronto, University of Toronto at Scarborough)
Profile: James Wilson (University College London)
Profile: James Lindley Wilson (University of Chicago)
Profile: Jeff Wilson
Profile: Julie Wilson (University of Notre Dame Australia)
Profile: Jen Wilson (University of Otago)
Profile: Juanita Wilson (University of Manitoba)
Profile: Jim Wilson (Naval Postgraduate School)
Profile: Judith Wilson (St. Charles Borromeo Seminary)
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  1. J. Wilson, Do We Need a Concept of Intraoperative Complication?
    Cunningham and Kavic [1] rightly note that standard accounts of surgical complications—ours included—have focused on postoperative events [2, 3]. As they point out, this postoperative focus leaves open the question of how we should categorize adverse intraoperative events. They argue that we should distinguish between two types of adverse intraoperative events: those that introduce additional risk of postoperative complications and those that do not. On their account, adverse intraoperative events that introduce additional risk of postoperative complications are intraoperative complications, whereas (...)
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  2. James Wilson, On the Value of the Intellectual Commons.
    When we talk about intellectual property, it is often implicitly assumed that we are talking about private intellectual property. However, private property and the idea of private ownership do not exhaust the possibilities for accounts of ownership and of property. There are other ways that ownership can operate, such as common property. A resource is common property if its use is ‘governed by rules whose point is to make them available for use by all or any members of the society.’.
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  3. James George Scott Wilson, Morality, Dignity and Pragmatism.
    This thesis is a constructive work in the tradition of morality. The thesis divides into three parts. Part One argues that morality is best considered as a tradition (in MacIntyre’s sense) in ethical thinking which begins with the Stoics, develops in Christian thought and reaches its apotheosis in Kant. This tradition structures ethical thinking around three basic concepts: cosmopolitanism, or universal applicability to human beings as such, the dignity of human beings and reciprocity. It is this tradition in ethical thinking (...)
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  4. Stephen Biggs & Jessica M. Wilson, Abductive Two-Dimensionalism: A New Route to the A Priori Identification of Necessary Truths.
    Chalmers and Jackson (2001) offer an epistemic interpretation of the two-dimensional semantic framework advanced by Kaplan (1979, 1989), Stalnaker (1978), and others. Epistemic two-dimensional semantics (E2D) aims to re-forge the link between necessity and a priority seemingly broken by Kripke (1972/1980). On the E2D strategy, a priori knowledge of certain semantic intensions provides a route to a priori knowledge of a wide range of modal truths---nice outcome, if we can get it. E2D faces the serious challenge, however, that we typically (...)
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  5. James Wilson, Health Inequities.
    The infant mortality rate in Liberia is 50 times higher than it is in Sweden, whilst a child born in Japan has a life expectancy at birth of more than double that of one born in Zambia. 1 And within countries, we see differences which are nearly as great. For example, if you were in the USA and travelled the short journey from the poorer parts of Washington to Montgomery County Maryland, you would find that ‘for each mile travelled life (...)
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  6. James Wilson, Microsoft on Copyright: An Ethical Analysis.
    “This chapter looks at four arguments which Microsoft has used to justify the claim that illegal copying of software is wrong: software piracy is theft; software piracy violates the rights of copyright holders; software piracy is free riding; and software piracy reduces incentives to future innovation. It argues that the first argument is simply wrong, and the other three do not establish that it is in fact wrong to pirate Microsoft’s programs.
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  7. James Wilson & Michael Göpfert, Maternal Mental Health: An Ethical Base for Good Practice.
    In this chapter we argue that the four principles of medical ethics -- beneficence, non-maleficence, respect for autonomy and justice (Beauchamp & Childress, 2001; Gillon, 1985), a new Family Interest Principle (introduced below) and a consideration of ‘capacity’ provide a reasoned practice guide for work with mothers experiencing health problems, focussing here on mental health when a parent is a patient. Our concern is the relationship of the clinician with a parent and through the parent their child. Ethics of service (...)
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  8. J. Christian Wilson (forthcoming). Book Review: Revelation. [REVIEW] Interpretation 56 (1):106-106.
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  9. J. R. S. Wilson (forthcoming). Thrasymachus' Theory of Justice'. Polis.
     
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  10. James R. Wilson (forthcoming). Book Review: Jesus Now and Then. [REVIEW] Interpretation 60 (1):106-106.
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  11. James R. Wilson (forthcoming). Book Review: The Experience of God: Icons of the Mystery. [REVIEW] Interpretation 61 (1):95-96.
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  12. Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Hume's Dictum and Metaphysical Modality: Lewis's Combinatorialism. In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to David Lewis. Blackwell.
    Many contemporary philosophers accept Hume's Dictum (HD), according to which there are no metaphysically necessary connections between distinct, intrinsically typed entities. Tacit in Lewis's work is a potential motivation for HD, according to which one should accept HD as presupposed by the best account of the range of metaphysical possibilities---namely, a combinatorial account, applied to spatiotemporal fundamentalia. Here I elucidate and assess this Ludovician motivation for HD. After refining HD and surveying its key, recurrent role in Lewis’s work, I present (...)
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  13. Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Metaphysical Emergence: Weak and Strong. In Tomasz Bigaj Christian Wuthrich (ed.), Metaphysics in Contemporary Physics. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities.
    Nearly all accounts of emergence take this to involve both broadly synchronic dependence and (some measure of) ontological and causal autonomy. Beyond this agreement, however, accounts of emergence diverge into a bewildering variety, reflecting that the core notions of dependence and autonomy have multiple, often incompatible interpretations. Here I argue that much of this apparent diversity is superficial. I start by considering a notorious problematic associated with special science entities---namely, the problem of higher-level causation. I then argue that, of the (...)
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  14. Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Three Dogmas of Metaphysical Methodology. In Matthew Haug (ed.), New Essays on Philosophical Methodology. Routledge.
    In what does philosophical progress consist? 'Vertical' progress corresponds to development within a specific paradigm/framework for theorizing (of the sort associated, revolutions aside, with science); 'horizontal' progress corresponds to the identification and cultivation of diverse paradigms (of the sort associated, conservativism aside, with art and pure mathematics). Philosophical progress seems to involve both horizontal and vertical dimensions, in a way that is somewhat puzzling: philosophers work in a number of competing frameworks (like artists or mathematicians), while typically maintaining that only (...)
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  15. John Wilson (forthcoming). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 1990. Semiotica.
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  16. John Wilson (forthcoming). First Steps in Education, Morality and Religion. Philosophy of Education.
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  17. John A. Wilson (forthcoming). The Foundations and Stages of Chinese Economic History. Zeitschrift für Sozialforschung.
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  18. John R. Wilson (forthcoming). Source Data Verification in Clinical Trials Involving the Temporarily Incapacitated Subject: Is There a Missing Link in the Notion of Proxy Consent? Irb.
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  19. John R. Wilson (forthcoming). Unsocial Actors in'Agamemnon'. Hermes.
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  20. Joseph P. Wilson (forthcoming). A Note on'Choephori'1058: Κἀξ Ὀμμάτων Στάζουσι Νᾶμα Δυσφιλές. Hermes.
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  21. Joseph P. Wilson (forthcoming). Grex Scipionis in De Amicitia: A Reply to Gary Forsythe. American Journal of Philology.
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  22. Jessica M. Wilson (2014). Hume's Dictum and the Asymmetry of Counterfactual Dependence. In Alastair Wilson (ed.), Chance and Temporal Asymmetry. Oxford University Press. 258-279.
    Why believe Hume's Dictum, according to which there are, roughly speaking, no necessary connections between wholly distinct entities? Schaffer ('Quiddistic Knowledge', 2009) suggests that HD, at least as applied to causal or nomological connections, is motivated as required by the best account of (the truth) of counterfactuals---namely, a similarity-based possible worlds account, where the operative notion of similarity requires 'miracles'---more specifically, worlds where entities of the same type that actually exist enter into different laws. The main cited motivations for such (...)
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  23. Jessica M. Wilson (2014). No Work for a Theory of Grounding. Inquiry 57 (5-6):1-45.
    It has recently been suggested that a distinctive metaphysical relation---"Grounding"---is ultimately at issue in contexts where some goings-on are said to hold "in virtue of"", be (constitutively) "metaphysically dependent on", or be "nothing over and above" some others (see Fine 2001, Schaffer 2009, and Rosen 2010). Grounding is supposed to do good work (better than merely modal notions, in particular) in illuminating metaphysical dependence. I argue that Grounding is also unsuited to do this work. To start, Grounding alone cannot do (...)
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  24. John G. Wilson (2014). Sartre and Cyber-Dissidence: The Groupe En Fusion and the Putative We-Subject. Sartre Studies International 20 (1):17-35.
    Recently, social-media tools have been widely credited with igniting pervasive social upheavals in the Middle East, some of which brought down governments. This article explores the putative structure of such gatherings and considers new developments in what such collectives might be from a Sartrean perspective, in particular as mediated by the arrival of social media. A Sartrean perspective on the still indefinite composition of media collectives is offered under Sartre's concept of the groupe en fusion , yet still open to (...)
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  25. Jessica M. Wilson (2013). A Determinable-Based Account of Metaphysical Indeterminacy. Inquiry 56 (4):359–385.
    Many phenomena appear to be indeterminate, including material macro-object boundaries, predicates or properties admitting of borderline cases, and certain open future claims. Here I provide an account of indeterminacy in metaphysical, rather than semantic or epistemic, terms. Previous such accounts have been "meta-level" accounts, taking metaphysical indeterminacy (MI) to involve its being indeterminate which of various determinate states of affairs obtain. On my alternative, "object-level" account, MI involves its being determinate (or just plain true) that an indeterminate (less than maximally (...)
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  26. Jessica M. Wilson (2013). Nonlinearity and Metaphysical Emergence. In Stephen Mumford & Matthew Tugby (eds.), Metaphysics and Science.
    The nonlinearity of a composite system, whereby certain of its features (including powers and behaviors) cannot be seen as linear or other broadly additive combinations of features of the system's composing entities, has been frequently seen as a mark of metaphysical emergence, coupling the dependence of a composite system on an underlying system of composing entities with the composite system's ontological autonomy from its underlying system. But why think that nonlinearity is a mark of emergence, and moreover, of metaphysical rather (...)
     
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  27. John Wilson (2013). Sham Contracting in Employment: Save Your Client, and Yourself. Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory 229:18.
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  28. John Wilson (2013). Time to Bring Back the Stocks?: The Hollow Victory of Tabloid Justice. Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory 227:14.
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  29. John Wilson (2013). Thank You, I Seek Leave to Appear: Seeking Permission for a Hearing with the Fair Work Commission. Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory 228:12.
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  30. Imran K. Choudhry, Joyce M. Wilson & Peter J. Stern (2012). Metallosis Following Silicone Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthroplasties with Grommets: Case Report. In Zdravko Radman (ed.), The Hand. Mit Press. 7--2.
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  31. Sarah J. L. Edwards & James Wilson (2012). Hard Paternalism, Fairness and Clinical Research: Why Not? Bioethics 26 (2):68-75.
    Jansen and Wall suggest a new way of defending hard paternalism in clinical research. They argue that non-therapeutic research exposing people to more than minimal risk should be banned on egalitarian grounds: in preventing poor decision-makers from making bad decisions, we will promote equality of welfare. We argue that their proposal is flawed for four reasons.First, the idea of poor decision-makers is much more problematic than Jansen and Wall allow. Second, pace Jansen and Wall, it may be practicable for regulators (...)
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  32. Robert Kohls & Jennifer Shade Wilson (2012). 2 Tutoring Adolescents in Literacy. In Alister H. Cumming (ed.), Adolescent Literacies in a Multicultural Context. Routledge. 23.
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  33. Daphne Meng-Ying Lin, Gloria Ramírez, Jennifer Shade Wilson & Esther Geva (2012). 8 Bridging Lexical Knowledge and Literacy. In Alister H. Cumming (ed.), Adolescent Literacies in a Multicultural Context. Routledge. 102.
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  34. Adam Murray & Jessica M. Wilson (2012). Relativized Metaphysical Modality. In Karen Bennett & Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 189.
    It is commonly supposed that metaphysical modal claims are to be evaluated with respect to a single domain of possible worlds: a claim is metaphysically necessary just in case it is true in every possible world, and metaphysically possible just in case it is true in some possible world. We argue that the standard understanding is incorrect; rather, whether a given claim is metaphysically necessary or possible is relative to which world is indicatively actual. We motivate our view by attention (...)
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  35. J. Wilson (2012). Persons, Post-Persons and Thresholds. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):143-144.
    DeGrazia argues that post-persons have as much justification in believing that they have higher moral status than persons as persons have in believing that they have higher moral status than animals. DeGrazia's claim presupposes that what Buchanan calls the “moral equality assumption” is false. This article argues that DeGrazia has given us no reason to disbelieve the moral equality assumption. Further, even if DeGrazia's arguments about moral status were sound, it is unclear that his first-order normative claims about how we (...)
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  36. James Wilson (2012). Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs by T. M. Wilkinson, 2011 New York, Oxford University Pressx + 209 Pp, £35.00 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (3):268-270.
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  37. James Wilson (2012). Paying for Patented Drugs is Hard to Justify: An Argument About Time Discounting and Medical Need. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (3):186-199.
    Drugs are much more expensive whilst they are subject to patent protection than once patents expire: patented drugs make up only 20% of NHS drugs prescriptions, but consume 80% of the total NHS drugs bill. This article argues that, given the relatively uncontroversial assumption that we should save the greater number in cases where all are equally deserving and we cannot save both groups, it is more difficult than is usually thought to justify why publicly funded healthcare systems should pay (...)
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  38. James Matthew Wilson (2012). From Being to Faith. Renascence 64 (3):251-274.
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  39. Jeffrey L. Wilson (2012). Historical Dictionary of Kant and Kantianism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):300-301.
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  40. Jennifer Shade Wilson (2012). 4 Students and Their Social Networks for Literacy. In Alister H. Cumming (ed.), Adolescent Literacies in a Multicultural Context. Routledge. 56.
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  41. Jessica M. Wilson (2012). Fundamental Determinables. Philosophers' Imprint 12 (4).
    Contemporary philosophers commonly suppose that any fundamental entities there may be are maximally determinate. More generally, they commonly suppose that, whether or not there are fundamental entities, any determinable entities there may be are grounded in, hence less fundamental than, more determinate entities. So, for example, Armstrong takes the physical objects constituting the presumed fundamental base to be “determinate in all respects” (1961, 59), and Lewis takes the properties characterizing things “completely and without redundancy” to be “highly specific” (1986, 60). (...)
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  42. Jessica M. Wilson (2012). The Regress Argument Against Cartesian Skepticism. Analysis 72 (4):668-673.
    I argue that Cartesian skepticism about the external world leads to a vicious regress of skeptical attitudes, the only principled and unproblematic response to which requires refraining from taking the very first skeptical step.
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  43. Robert Bringle, Morgan Studer, Jarod Wilson, Patti Clayton & Kathryn Steinberg (2011). Designing Programs with a Purpose: To Promote Civic Engagement for Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (2):149-164.
    Curricular and co-curricular civic engagement activities and programs are analyzed in terms of their capacity to contribute to a common set of outcomes associated with nurturing civic-minded graduates: academic knowledge, familiarity with volunteering and nonprofit sector, knowledge of social issues, communication skills, diversity skills, self-efficacy, and intentions to be involved in communities. Different programs that promote civic-mindedness, developmental models, and assessment strategies that can contribute to program enhancement are presented.
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  44. J. Wilson (2011). Why It's Time to Stop Worrying About Paternalism in Health Policy. Public Health Ethics 4 (3):269-279.
    Public health policies which involve active intervention to improve the health of the population are often criticized as paternalistic. This article argues that it is a mistake to frame our discussions of public health policies in terms of paternalism. First, it is deeply problematic to pick out which policies should count as paternalistic; at best, we can talk about paternalistic justifications for policies. Second, two of the elements that make paternalism problematic at an individual level—interference with liberty and lack of (...)
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  45. James Wilson (2011). Freedom of Information and Research Data. Research Ethics 7 (3):107-111.
    Research data produced in both universities and the NHS are subject to the Freedom of Information Act 2000. This article examines the practical and ethical implications of freedom of information for research data, arguing that increased openness is both here to stay and is ethically justifiable. Researchers need to learn how best to cope with this.
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  46. James Matthew Wilson (2011). Socrates in Hell. Renascence 63 (2):147-168.
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  47. Jeffrey Wilson (2011). The Wrong War: Grit, Strategy, and the Way Out of Afghanistan. Journal of Military Ethics 10 (4):330-331.
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  48. Jeffrey Dirk Wilson (2011). Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment. Review of Metaphysics 64 (3):625-627.
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  49. Jeffrey Dirk Wilson (2011). Plato's “Symposium”. Review of Metaphysics 65 (1):150-152.
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