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Jonathan Wolff [112]J. Wolff [19]Janet Wolff [11]Johanna Wolff [5]
Jonci N. Wolff [2]Jules Wolff [2]Jacques Wolff [1]J. Gerard Wolff [1]

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See also:
Profile: Johanna Wolff (Stanford University)
Profile: Johanna Wolff (University of Puget Sound)
Profile: Jo Wolff (University College London, University College London)
Profile: Josh Wolff (University of North Dakota, Grand Forks)
Profile: Joan Wolff (Bryn Mawr College)
Profile: J. Wolff (University of Hong Kong)
  1.  29
    Jonathan Wolff (forthcoming). How Propaganda Works By Jason Stanley. Analysis:anw046.
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  2.  15
    J. Wolff & A. de-Shalit (2007). Disadvantage. OUP Oxford.
    What does it mean to be disadvantaged? Is it possible to compare different disadvantages? What should governments do to move their societies in the direction of equality, where equality is to be understood both in distributional and social terms? Linking rigorous analytical philosophical theory with broad empirical studies, including interviews conducted for the purpose of this book, Wolff and de-Shalit show how taking theory and practice together is essential if the theory is to be rich enough to be applied to (...)
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  3. Jonathan Wolff (1998). Fairness, Respect, and the Egalitarian Ethos. Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (2):97–122.
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  4. Jonathan Wolff (2011). Ethics and Public Policy: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge.
    Train crashes cause, on average, a handful of deaths each year in the UK. Technologies exist that would save the lives of some of those who die. Yet these technical innovations would cost hundreds of millions of pounds. Should we spend the money? How can we decide how to trade off life against financial cost? Such dilemmas make public policy is a battlefield of values, yet all too often we let technical experts decide the issues for us. Can philosophy help (...)
     
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  5. Jonathan Wolff (1987). Erratum: Barnett, Bargaining and the Nash Solution. Noûs 21 (1):111.
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  6. J. Wolff (2012). Do Objects Depend on Structures? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (3):607-625.
    Ontic structural realists hold that structure is all there is, or at least all there is fundamentally. This thesis has proved to be puzzling: What exactly does it say about the relationship between objects and structures? In this article, I look at different ways of articulating ontic structural realism in terms of the relation between structures and objects. I show that objects cannot be reduced to structure, and argue that ontological dependence cannot be used to establish strong forms of structural (...)
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  7.  5
    J. E. Wolff (2016). Using Defaults to Understand Token Causation. Journal of Philosophy 113 (1):5-26.
    Recent literature on causation invokes a distinction between deviant and default behavior to account for token causation. Critical examination of two prominent attempts to employ a distinction between deviants and defaults reveals that the distinction is far from clear. I clarify and develop the distinction by appeal to the notion of a modally robust process, and show how the distinction can be employed by causal process theorists to respond to cases of causation by omission. This shows that the default/deviant distinction (...)
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  8. Jonathan Wolff (2010). Fairness, Respect and the Egalitarian Ethos Revisited. Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):335-350.
    This paper reconsiders some themes and arguments from my earlier paper “Fairness, Respect and the Egalitarian Ethos.” That work is often considered to be part of a cluster of papers attacking “luck egalitarianism” on the grounds that insisting on luck egalitarianism's standards of fairness undermines relations of mutual respect among citizens. While this is an accurate reading, the earlier paper did not make its motivations clear, and the current paper attempts to explain the reasons that led me to write the (...)
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  9. Jonathan Wolff (2007). Equality: The Recent History of an Idea. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (1):125-136.
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  10.  2
    Jonci N. Wolff & Neil J. Gemmell (2013). Mitochondria, Maternal Inheritance, and Asymmetric Fitness: Why Males Die Younger. Bioessays 35 (2):93-99.
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  11. Janet Wolff (2011). A 'Small, Limited World': Janina Bauman's Personal and Historical Stories. Thesis Eleven 107 (1):72-80.
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  12. Jonathan Wolff (2006). An Introduction to Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The revised edition of this highly successful text provides a clear and accessible introduction to some of the most important questions of political philosophy. Organized around major issues, Wolff provides the structure that beginners need, while also introducing some distinctive ideas of his own.
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  13. Jonathan Wolff (2009). Disability Among Equals. In Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.), Disability and Disadvantage. OUP Oxford
     
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  14.  69
    Jonathan Wolff (2009). Disability, Status Enhancement, Personal Enhancement and Resource Allocation. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):49-68.
    It often appears that the most appropriate form of addressing disadvantage related to disability is through policies that can be called “status enhancements”: changes to the social, cultural and material environment so that the difficulties experienced by those with impairments are reduced, even eradicated. However, status enhancements can also have their limitations. This paper compares the relative merits of policies of status enhancement and “personal enhancement”: changes to the disabled person. It then takes up the question of how to assess (...)
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  15. Johanna Wolff (2013). Are Conservation Laws Metaphysically Necessary? Philosophy of Science 80 (5):898-906.
    Are laws of nature necessary, and if so, are all laws of nature necessary in the same way? This question has played an important role in recent discussion of laws of nature. I argue that not all laws of nature are necessary in the same way: conservation laws are perhaps to be regarded as metaphysically necessary. This sheds light on both the modal character of conservation laws and the relationship between different varieties of necessity.
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  16.  49
    Jonathan Wolff (2012). The Demands of the Human Right to Health. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):217-237.
    The human right to health has been established in international law since 1976. However, philosophers have often regarded human rights doctrine as a marginal contribution to political philosophy, or have attempted to distinguish ‘human rights proper’ from ‘aspirations’, with the human right to health often considered as falling into the latter category. Here the human right to health is defended as an attractive approach to global health, and responses are offered to a series of criticisms concerning its demandingness.
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  17. Jonathan Wolff (2011). Ethics and Public Policy: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge.
    Train crashes cause, on average, a handful of deaths each year in the UK. Technologies exist that would save the lives of some of those who die. Yet these technical innovations would cost hundreds of millions of pounds. Should we spend the money? How can we decide how to trade off life against financial cost? Such dilemmas make public policy is a battlefield of values, yet all too often we let technical experts decide the issues for us. Can philosophy help (...)
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  18.  9
    Jonathan Wolff (2015). Paying People to Act in Their Own Interests: Incentives Versus Rationalization in Public Health. Public Health Ethics 8 (1):27-30.
    A number of schemes have been attempted, both in public health and more generally within social programmes, to pay individuals to behave in ways that are presumed to be good for them or to have other beneficial effects. Such schemes are normally regarded as providing a financial incentive for individuals in order to outweigh contrary motivation. Such schemes have been attacked on the basis that they can ‘crowd out’ intrinsic motivation, as well as on the grounds that they are in (...)
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  19.  91
    Jonathan Wolff (2013). Scanlon on Social and Material Inequality. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):406-425.
  20.  4
    Neil Gemmell & Jonci N. Wolff (2015). Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Cautiously Replace the Master Manipulator. Bioessays 37 (6):584-585.
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  21.  50
    Jonathan Wolff (2006). Risk, Fear, Blame, Shame and the Regulation of Public Safety. Economics and Philosophy 22 (3):409-427.
    The question of when people may impose risks on each other is of fundamental moral importance. Forms of “quantified risk assessment,” especially risk cost-benefit analysis, provide one powerful approach to providing a systematic answer. It is also well known that such techniques can show that existing resources could be used more effectively to reduce risk overall. Thus it is often argued that some current practices are irrational. On the other hand critics of quantified risk assessment argue that it cannot adequately (...)
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  22.  36
    Johanna Wolff (2015). Spin as a Determinable. Topoi 34 (2):379-386.
    In this paper I aim to answer two questions: Can spin be treated as a determinable? Can a treatment of spin as a determinable be used to understand quantum indeterminacy? In response to the first question I show that the relations among spin number, spin components and spin values cannot be captured by a single determination relation; instead we need to look at spin number and spin value separately. In response to the second question I discuss three ways in which (...)
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  23.  90
    Madeleine Hayenhjelm & Jonathan Wolff (2012). The Moral Problem of Risk Impositions: A Survey of the Literature. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (S1):E1-E142.
    This paper surveys the current philosophical discussion of the ethics of risk imposition, placing it in the context of relevant work in psychology, economics and social theory. The central philosophical problem starts from the observation that it is not practically possible to assign people individual rights not to be exposed to risk, as virtually all activity imposes some risk on others. This is the ‘problem of paralysis’. However, the obvious alternative theory that exposure to risk is justified when its total (...)
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  24. Hillel Steiner & Jonathan Wolff (2003). A General Framework for Resolving Disputed Land Claims. Analysis 63 (3):188–189.
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  25.  5
    J. Wolff (2016). Birthday Cards for Zygmunt Bauman. Thesis Eleven 133 (1):114-115.
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  26.  38
    Jonathan Wolff (2009). Disadvantage, Risk and the Social Determinants of Health. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):214-223.
    The paper describes a project in which the thesis of the social determinants of health is used in order to help identify groups that will be among the least advantaged members of society, when disadvantage is understood in terms of lack of genuine opportunity for secure functioning. The analysis is derived from the author's work with Avner de-Shalit in Disadvantage (Oxford University Press, 2007).
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  27.  31
    Jonathan Wolff (2007). What is the Value of Preventing a Fatality? In Tim Lewens (ed.), Risk: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge
    in Risk: Philosophical Perspectives ed Tim Lewens, Routledge.
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  28.  88
    Jonathan Wolff (1995). Political Obligation, Fairness, and Independence. Ratio 8 (1):87-99.
    In the first section the problem of political obligation is motivated, and in Section 2 the core structure of the problem is laid bare. A recognition ofthis structure prompts reflection that the problem will appear very different to different thinkers, depending on their moral theories. It also invites the speculation that the problem will be incapable of solution on some moral theories while trivial on others. This polarity does reflect the state of much of the literature until fairly recently. However (...)
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  29. Jonathan Wolff (1999). Marx and Exploitation. Journal of Ethics 3 (2):105--120.
    The discussion of the adequacy of Karl Marx''s definition of exploitation has paid insufficient attention to a prior question: what is a definition? Once we understand Marx as offering a reference-fixing definition in a model we will realise that it is resistant to certain objections. A more general analysis of exploitation is offered here and it is suggested that Marx''s own definition is a particular instance of the general analysis which makes a number of controversial moral assumptions.
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  30. Jonathan Wolff (1998). Mill, Indecency and the Liberty Principle. Utilitas 10 (1):1-16.
    In this paper I want to do two things. One concerns Mill’s attitude to public indecency. In On Liberty Mill expresses the conventional view that certain actions, if conducted in public, are an affront to good manners, and can properly be prohibited. I want to come to an understanding of Mill’s position so that it allows him to defend this part of conventional morality, but does not disrupt certain of his liberal convictions: principally the conviction that what consenting adults do (...)
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  31.  16
    Johanna Wolff (forthcoming). Naturalistic Quietism or Scientific Realism? Synthese:1-14.
    Realists about science tend to hold that our scientific theories aim for the truth, that our successful theories are at least partly true, and that the entities referred to by the theoretical terms of these theories exist. Antirealists about science deny one or more of these claims. A sizable minority of philosophers of science prefers not to take sides: they believe the realism debate to be fundamentally mistaken and seek to abstain from it altogether. In analogy with other realism debates (...)
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  32.  34
    Jonathan Wolff (2002). Addressing Disadvantage and the Human Good. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):207–218.
    This paper sets out a framework in which we can distinguish between four types of redistributive attention to the disadvantaged: compensation; personal enhancement; targeted resource enhancement; and status enhancement. It is argued that in certain cases many of us will have strong intuitions in favour or against one or more strategies for addressing disadvantage, and it is further argued that in such cases it is likely that our reactions are based on assumptions about the human good. Hence the two issues (...)
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  33.  43
    J. Wolff (1985). The Invisible Flaneuse. Women and the Literature of Modernity. Theory, Culture and Society 2 (3):37-46.
    The literature of modernity, describing the fleeting, anonymous, ephemeral encounters of life in the metropolis, mainly accounts for the experiences of men. It ignores the concomitant separation of public and private spheres from the mid-nineteenth century, and the increasing segregation of the sexes around that separation. The influential writings of Baudelaire, Simmel, Benjamin and, more recently, Richard Sennett and Marshall Berman, by equating the modern with the public, thus fail to describe women's experience of modernity. The central figure of the (...)
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  34.  29
    Jonathan Wolff (1995). Pluralistic Models of Political Obligation. Philosophica 56 (2):7-27.
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  35.  19
    Jonathan Wolff (2015). Political Philosophy and the Real World of the Welfare State. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4):360-372.
    What contribution can political philosophers make to policy questions, such as the best configuration of the welfare state? On one view, political philosophers set out abstract theories of justice that can guide policy makers in their attempt to transform existing institutions. Yet it rarely seems the case that such a model is used in practice, and it therefore becomes unclear how political philosophy can contribute to policy debates. Following a suggestion from Margaret MacDonald, I consider the view that political philosophers (...)
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  36. Jonathan Wolff, The Ethics of Competition.
    Exchange is one thing, economic competition another. Exchange is possible without competition; and economic competition (of sorts) is possible without exchange. Put exchange and competition together and, roughly, you get the free market. There are many philosophical discussions of the free market; a sizeable number about free exchange; but - - aside from in the context of consequentialist defences of the market - - who this century has had much to say about economic competition?
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  37.  11
    Dudley Knowles & Jonathan Wolff (1993). Robert Nozick: Property, Justice and the Minimal State. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):566.
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  38.  11
    Jonathan Wolff (2000). Political Obligation: A Pluralistic Approach. In Maria Baghramian & Attracta Ingram (eds.), Pluralism: The Philosophy and Politics of Diversity. Routledge 179--96.
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  39.  27
    Jonathan Wolff, Sarah Edwards, Sarah Richmond, O. R. R. Shepley & Geraint Rees (2012). Evaluating Interventions in Health: A Reconciliatory Approach. Bioethics 26 (9):455-463.
    Health-related Quality of Life measures have recently been attacked from two directions, both of which criticize the preference-based method of evaluating health states they typically incorporate. One attack, based on work by Daniel Kahneman and others, argues that ‘experience’ is a better basis for evaluation. The other, inspired by Amartya Sen, argues that ‘capability’ should be the guiding concept. In addition, opinion differs as to whether health evaluation measures are best derived from consultations with the general public, with patients, or (...)
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  40.  47
    Jonathan Wolff (1997). Freedom, Liberty, and Property. Critical Review 11 (3):345-357.
    If one values freedom, what sort of regime of property should one favor: libertarianism, socialism, or something else again? Debate on this topic has been hampered by a failure to distinguish freedom and liberty, which are both of great value, but can come into conflict. Furthermore there are many similar concepts?distinct from both liberty and freedom, yet each representing something we rightly value?which may also come into conflict with each other and with freedom and liberty. Consequently the question posed above (...)
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  41. Jonathan Wolff (1998). Fairness, Respect, and the Egalitarian Ethos. Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (2):97-122.
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  42.  11
    Johanna Wolff (2015). Observability, Visualizability and the Question of Metaphysical Neutrality. Foundations of Physics 45 (9):1046-1062.
    Theories in fundamental physics are unlikely to be ontologically neutral, yet they may nonetheless fail to offer decisive empirical support for or against particular metaphysical positions. I illustrate this point by close examination of a particular objection raised by Wolfgang Pauli against Hermann Weyl. The exchange reveals that both parties to the dispute appeal to broader epistemological principles to defend their preferred metaphysical starting points. I suggest that this should make us hesitant to assume that in deriving metaphysical conclusions from (...)
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  43.  19
    Jonathan Wolff (2007). Success and Stupor. The Philosophers' Magazine 39 (39):35-39.
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  44.  45
    Jonathan Wolff (2009). Cognitive Disability in a Society of Equals. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):402-415.
    This paper considers the range of possible policy options that are available if we wish to attempt to treat people with cognitive disabilities as equal members of society. It is suggested that the goal of policy should be allow each disabled person to establish a worthwhile place in the world and sets out four policy options: cash compensation, personal enhancement, status enhancement and targeted resource enhancement. The paper argues for the social policy of targeted resource enhancement for individuals with cognitive (...)
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  45.  4
    Jonathan Wolff, Sarah Edwards, Sarah Richmond, Shepley Orr & Geraint Rees (2012). Evaluating Interventions in Health: A Reconciliatory Approach. Bioethics 26 (9):455-463.
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  46.  63
    Jonathan Wolff (2006). Making the World Safe for Utilitarianism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 81 (58):1-.
    Utilitarianism has a curious history. Its most celebrated founders – Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill – were radical progressives, straddling the worlds of academic philosophy, political science, economic theory and practical affairs. They made innumerable recommendations for legal, social, political and economic reform, often (especially in Bentham’s case) described in fine detail. Some of these recommendations were followed, sooner or later, and many of their radical ideas have become close to articles of faith of western liberalism. Furthermore many of (...)
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  47.  99
    Jonathan Wolff (2009). Rational, Fair, and Reasonable. Utilitas 8 (3):263.
    There can be no doubt that Brian Barry has made an enormous contribution to the clarification of the ideas of justice current in contemporary political thought. In Barry’s Justice as Impartiality he explicitly distinguishes and sets in competition three models of justice: justice as mutual advantage; justice as reciprocity; and justice as impartiality, and he argues that we should prefer the last of these. What I want to do here is to consider four questions. First, what is this competition a (...)
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  48.  77
    Jonathan Wolff & Hillel Steiner (2006). Disputed Land Claims: A Response to Weatherson and to Bou-Habib and Olsaretti. Analysis 66 (3):248 - 255.
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  49.  46
    Jonathan Wolff (1993). Hume, Bentham, and the Social Contract. Utilitas 5 (1):87-.
    Hume famously argues that Social Contract theory collapses into a form of utilitarianism. Bentham endorses Hume's argument. I show that, if Hume's argument refutes Social Contract theory, it equally undermines Bentham's own utilitarian account of political obligation. This discussion is used to illustrate a more general thesis that there is no single problem of political obligation, but different problems for different theorists.
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  50.  35
    Jonathan Wolff (2002). Why Read Marx Today? Oxford University Press.
    The fall of the Berlin Wall had enormous symbolic resonance, marking the collapse of Marxist politics and economics. Indeed, Marxist regimes have failed miserably, and with them, it seems, all reason to take the writings of Karl Marx seriously. Jonathan Wolff argues that if we detach Marx the critic of current society from Marx the prophet of some never-to-be-realized worker's paradise, he remains the most impressive critic we have of liberal, capitalist, bourgeois society. The author shows how Marx's main ideas (...)
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