Search results for 'Jack S. Levy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  16
    Jack S. Levy (2003). Applications of Prospect Theory to Political Science. Synthese 135 (2):215 - 241.
    Prospect theory is an alternative theory of choice under conditions of risk, and deviates from expected utility theory by positing that people evaluate choices with respect to gains and losses from a reference point. They tend to overweight losses with respect to comparable gains and engage in risk-averse behavior with respect to gains and risk-acceptant behavior with respect to losses. They also respond to probabilities in a non-linear manner. I begin with an overview of prospect theory and some of the (...)
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  2.  11
    Jack S. Levy (2007). Explaining War and Peace: Case Studies and Necessary Condition Counterfactuals. Routledge.
    This edited volume focuses on the use of ?necessary condition counterfactuals? in explaining two key events in twentieth century history, the origins of the ...
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  3.  7
    Sanford S. Levy (2009). Philippa Foot's Theory of Natural Goodness. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 14 (1):1-15.
    Philippa Foot's book, Natural Goodness, involves a large project including a theory of natural goodness, a theory of the virtues, and a theory of practical rationality. Natural goodness is the foundation for the rest and is used to support a more or less traditional list of the virtues and a theory of reasons for action. Though Foot's doctrine of natural goodness may provide an account of some sort of goodness, I argue that it is not adequate as a foundation for (...)
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  4. David N. Levy (2014). Wily Elites and Spirited Peoples in Machiavelli’s Republicanism. Lexington Books.
    In this book, author David N. Levy uses Machiavelli’s conflict between the elite and the people as the lens through which to understand the other major features of his republicanism. Through analyzing his Discourses on Livy, Levy shows that Machiavelli’s principles can provide support for, and constructive criticism of, modern liberal democracy.
     
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  5. David N. Levy (2016). Wily Elites and Spirited Peoples in Machiavelli's Republicanism. Lexington Books.
    In this book, author David N. Levy uses Machiavelli’s conflict between the elite and the people as the lens through which to understand the other major features of his republicanism. Through analyzing his Discourses on Livy, Levy shows that Machiavelli’s principles can provide support for, and constructive criticism of, modern liberal democracy.
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  6.  2
    Sanford S. Levy (1999). Thomas Reid's Defense of Conscience. History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (4):413 - 435.
  7.  7
    Bernard S. Levy & George R. Adams (1967). Chauntecleer's Paradise Lost and Regained. Mediaeval Studies 29 (1):178-192.
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  8. Arnon Levy (2013). What Was Hodgkin and Huxley's Achievement? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (3):axs043.
    The Hodgkin–Huxley (HH) model of the action potential is a theoretical pillar of modern neurobiology. In a number of recent publications, Carl Craver ([2006], [2007], [2008]) has argued that the model is explanatorily deficient because it does not reveal enough about underlying molecular mechanisms. I offer an alternative picture of the HH model, according to which it deliberately abstracts from molecular specifics. By doing so, the model explains whole-cell behaviour as the product of a mass of underlying low-level events. The (...)
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  9.  45
    Ken Levy (2014). It's Not Too Difficult: A Plea to Resurrect the Impossibility Defense. New Mexico Law Revview 45:225-274.
    Suppose you are at the gym trying to see some naked beauties by peeping through a hole in the wall. A policeman happens by, he asks you what you are doing, and you honestly tell him. He then arrests you for voyeurism. Are you guilty? We don’t know yet because there is one more fact to be considered: while you honestly thought that a locker room was on the other side of the wall, it was actually a squash court. Are (...)
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  10.  5
    Ken Levy (forthcoming). Review of Bebhinn Donnelly-Lazarov's Philosophy of Criminal Attempts: The Subjective Approach. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence.
    Issues include attempts generally; the problem of outcome luck; the impossibility defense; physical movement and intent; and reckless attempts, attempted rape, and attempted theft. In the final section, I offer a hypothetical that challenges Prof. Donnelly-Lazarov's theory.
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  11.  8
    Lior Levy (2016). Intentionality, Consciousness, and the Ego: The Influence of Husserl’s Logical Investigations on Sartre’s Early Work. The European Legacy 21 (5-6):511-524.
    Jean-Paul Sartre’s early phenomenological texts reveal the complexity of his relationship to Edmund Husserl. Deeply indebted to phenomenology’s method as well as its substance, Sartre nonetheless confronted Husserl’s transcendental turn from Ideas onward. Although numerous studies have focused on Sartre’s points of contention with Husserl, drawing attention to his departure from Husserlian phenomenology, scholars have rarely examined the way in which Sartre engaged and responded to the early Husserl, particularly to his discussions of intentionality, consciousness, and self in Logical Investigations. (...)
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  12. Ken Levy (2009). On the Rationalist Solution to Gregory Kavka's Toxin Puzzle. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (2):267-289.
    Gregory Kavka's 'Toxin Puzzle' suggests that I cannot intend to perform a counter-preferential action A even if I have a strong self-interested reason to form this intention. The 'Rationalist Solution,' however, suggests that I can form this intention. For even though it is counter-preferential, A-ing is actually rational given that the intention behind it is rational. Two arguments are offered for this proposition that the rationality of the intention to A transfers to A-ing itself: the 'Self-Promise Argument' and David Gauthier's (...)
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  13.  42
    Neil Levy (2011). Searle's Wager. AI and Society 26 (4):363-369.
    Nicholas Agar has recently argued that it would be irrational for future human beings to choose to radically enhance themselves by uploading their minds onto computers. Utilizing Searle’s argument that machines cannot think, he claims that uploading might entail death. He grants that Searle’s argument is controversial, but he claims, so long as there is a non-zero probability that uploading entails death, uploading is irrational. I argue that Agar’s argument, like Pascal’s wager on which it is modelled, fails, because the (...)
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  14.  54
    Neil Levy (2005). Libet's Impossible Demand. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (12):67-76.
    Abstract : Libet’s famous experiments, showing that apparently we become aware of our intention to act only after we have unconsciously formed it, have widely been taken to show that there is no such thing as free will. If we are not conscious of the formation of our intentions, many people think, we do not exercise the right kind of control over them. I argue that the claim this view presupposes, that only consciously initiated actions could be free, places a (...)
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  15.  35
    David Levy (2013). Socrates Vs. Callicles: Examination and Ridicule in Plato's Gorgias. Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 2013:27-36.
    The Callicles colloquy of Plato’s Gorgias features both examination and ridicule. Insofar as Socrates’ examination of Callicles proceeds via the elenchus, the presence of ridicule requires explanation. This essay seeks to provide that explanation by placing the effort to ridicule within the effort to examine; that is, the judgment/pronouncement that something/someone is worthy of ridicule is a proper part of the elenchic examination. Standard accounts of the Socratic elenchus do not include this component. Hence, the argument of this essay suggests (...)
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  16.  47
    Neil Levy (2007). The Social: A Missing Term in the Debate Over Addiction and Voluntary Control. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):35 – 36.
    The author comments on the article “The Neurobiology of Addiction: Implications for Voluntary Control of Behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman’s article suggests that addicted individuals have impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author agrees with Hyman’s view that addiction weakens the addict’s ability to align his actions with his judgments. The author states that neuroethics may focus on brains and highlight key aspects of behavior but we still risk missing explanatory elements. Accession Number: 24077912; Authors: Levy, Neil (...)
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  17.  43
    Neil Levy (2015). Zimmerman’s The Immorality of Punishment: A Critical Essay. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (1):103-112.
    In “The Immorality of Punishment”, Michael Zimmerman attempts to show that punishment is morally unjustified and therefore wrong. In this response, I focus on two main questions. First, I examine whether Zimmerman’s empirical claims—concerning our inability to identify wrongdoers who satisfy conditions on blameworthiness and who might be reformed through punishment, and the comparative efficacy of punitive and non-punitive responses to crime—stand up to scrutiny. Second, I argue that his crucial argument from luck depends on claims about counterfactuals that ought (...)
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  18.  2
    Neil Levy, Searle's Wager.
    Nicholas Agar has recently argued that it would be irrational for future human beings to choose to radically enhance themselves by uploading their minds onto computers. Utilizing Searle’s argument that machines cannot think, he claims that uploading might entail death. He grants that Searle’s argument is controversial, but he claims, so long as there is a non-zero probability that uploading entails death, uploading is irrational. I argue that Agar’s argument, like Pascal’s wager on which it is modelled, fails, because the (...)
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  19.  21
    Anthony I. Jack & Philip Robbins (2004). The Illusory Triumph of Machine Over Mind: Wegner's Eliminativism and the Real Promise of Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):665-666.
    Wegner's thesis that the experience of will is an illusion is not just wrong, it is an impediment to progress in psychology. We discuss two readings of Wegner's thesis and find that neither can motivate his larger conclusion. Wegner thinks science requires us to dismiss our experiences. Its real promise is to help us to make better sense of them.
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  20.  48
    H. H. Jack (1971). Utilitarianism and Ross's Theory of Prima Facie Duties. Dialogue 10 (3):437-456.
    This paper argues that ross's theory is an unsatisfactory compromise between moore's ideal utilitarianism and prichard's intuitionism. by including an 'optimific' principle, ross is exposed like moore to such difficulties as having to grant that we never know our duty and that logically we have a duty to pursue our own pleasure. in addition, this paper attributes to moore's influence ross's very inadequate treatment of justice; difficulties in his basic distinction of prima facie versus actual duties; and his unsatisfactory treatments (...)
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  21.  11
    Sanford Levy (2014). The Failure of Hooker’s Argument for Rule Consequentialism. Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (5):598-614.
    Brad Hooker argues for rule consequentialism using narrow reflective equilibrium resources along with a handful of wider resources. One of his important claims in defense of rule consequentialism is that it begins from a familiar and attractive idea about morality. I argue that his defense of rule consequentialism fails and more particularly, that rather than beginning from a familiar and attractive idea, it begins from an idea that is quite unattractive. I show this by applying the method rule consequentialists use (...)
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  22.  12
    Lior Levy (2013). Reflection, Memory and Selfhood in Jean-Paul Sartre's Early Philosophy. Sartre Studies International 19 (2):97-111.
    The article advances an interpretation of the self as an imaginary object. Focusing on the relationship between selfhood and memory in Sartre's The Transcendence of the Ego , I argue that Sartre offers useful resources for thinking about the self in terms of narratives. Against interpretations that hold that the ego misrepresents consciousness or distorts it, I argue that the constitution of the ego marks a radical transformation of the conscious field. To prove this point, I turn to the role (...)
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  23.  10
    Ze'ev Levy (1986). S.H. Bergman on the Relation Between Philosophy and Religion. In Abraham Zvie Bar-On (ed.), Grazer Philosophische Studien. Distributed in the U.S.A. By Humanities Press 115-134.
    The relations between philosophy, science and religion preoccupied S.H. Bergman for many years. He wanted to corroborate, by belief, a personal God to whom, and not only about whom, one can speak. This should follow from authentic religious experience, making it independent from philosophy. Furthermore, according to Bergman, religion can do what philosophical reasoning is incapable of doing since he considers belief to be stronger than knowledge. A criticalscrutiny of these assumptions involves some interesting implications concerning toleration, freedom-of-thought and dogmatism. (...)
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  24.  7
    Donald Levy (1988). Gr Nbaum's Freud. Inquiry 31 (2):193 – 215.
    Grünbaum characterizes the foundations of psychoanalysis as consisting primarily of two assertions ? (1) only psychoanalysis can give correct insight into the unconscious causes of neurosis, and (2) only such correct insight can cure neurosis. Grünbaum infers from these that therapeutic success is the only evidence of the correctness of psychoanalytic theories. It is obvious that the two passages in Freud on which Grünbaum relies do not justify his interpretation. Furthermore, Freud thought of therapeutic success as by no means the (...)
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  25.  6
    Stephen H. Levy (1986). Peirce's Ordinal Conception of Number. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 22 (1):23 - 42.
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  26.  4
    Steven Levy, Lawrence Lessig's Supreme Showdown.
    What's left of a dream is stored at the Stanford Law School library in 12 fat green loose-leaf binders and several legal boxes of supporting documents and briefs. They chronicle the 54 days that Lawrence Lessig, the Elvis of cyberlaw, helped Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson with the mother of all tech litigation: Department of Justice v. Microsoft. It was to be Lessig's greatest moment.
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  27.  3
    Henry Jack (1959). Reply to Barker's Criticism of Formalism. Philosophy of Science 26 (4):355-361.
    Professor S. F. Barker has recently argued that the theory of the status of theoretical concepts in natural science put forward by Hempel and Braithwaite is mistaken. Essentially this "formalistic" theory says that these concepts "take on" meaning from their place in a total theoretical system which as a whole implies testable observation statements. In the paper it is argued that Barker's criticism of the Hempel-Braithwaite theory is mistaken because (a) he does not sufficiently consider the operative empirical restrictions on (...)
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  28. Malcolm Jack (1st ed. 2015). Men Become Sociable by Living Together in Society: Re-assessing Mandeville’s Social Theory. In Joaquim Braga & Edmundo Balsemão Pires (eds.), Bernard de Mandeville's Tropology of Paradoxes. Springer International Publishing
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  29.  36
    David K. Levy & Edoardo Zamuner (eds.) (2008). Wittgenstein's Enduring Arguments. Routledge.
    This outstanding collection explores Wittgenstein’s enduring place in twentieth century philosophy.
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  30. Edoardo Zamuner & D. K. Levy (eds.) (2014). Wittgenstein’s Enduring Arguments. Routledge.
    Fifty years after Wittgenstein's death, his philosophy and the arguments it embodied remain vital and applicable. _Wittgenstein's Enduring Arguments_ illustrates the use of Wittgenstein's thought for continuing philosophical debates, old and new. Featuring essays by leading international philosophers, the collection examines the key theme of representation in Wittgenstein's philosophy. Organised into three clear parts the book considers representation in cognition, in language and in what cannot be represented - the absolute. The first part applies Wittgenstein to leading questions concerning qualia, (...)
     
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  31. Edoardo Zamuner & D. K. Levy (eds.) (2008). Wittgenstein’s Enduring Arguments. Routledge.
    Fifty years after Wittgenstein's death, his philosophy and the arguments it embodied remain vital and applicable. _Wittgenstein's Enduring Arguments_ illustrates the use of Wittgenstein's thought for continuing philosophical debates, old and new. Featuring essays by leading international philosophers, the collection examines the key theme of representation in Wittgenstein's philosophy. Organised into three clear parts the book considers representation in cognition, in language and in what cannot be represented - the absolute. The first part applies Wittgenstein to leading questions concerning qualia, (...)
     
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  32. A. Levy (2014). What Was Hodgkin and Huxley's Achievement? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (3):469-492.
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  33.  89
    Neil Levy (1998). History as Struggle: Foucault's Genealogy of Genealogy. History of the Human Sciences 11 (4):159-170.
  34. Azriel Lévy (1960). A Generalization of Gödel's Notion of Constructibility. Journal of Symbolic Logic 25 (2):147-155.
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  35.  67
    Roger T. Ames, Peter D. Hershock, Andrew R. Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (2008). Bonner, Anthony. The Art and Logic of Ramon Llull: A User's Guide. Studien Und Texte Zur Geistesge-Schichte des Mittelalters, 95. Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2007. Pp. Xx+ 333. Cloth, $150.00. Boros, Gábor, Herman De Dijn, and Martin Moors, Editors. The Concept of Love in 17th and 18th Century Philosophy. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2007. Pp. 269. Paper,€ 35.50. Boulnois, Olivier. Au-Delà de l'Image, Une Archéologie du Visual au Moyen Âge, Ve-XVIe Siècle. Paris: Des. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):653-56.
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  36.  28
    Ellen Winner, Jonathan Levy, Joan Kaplan & Elizabeth Rosenblatt (1988). Children's Understanding of Nonliteral Language. Journal of Aesthetic Education 22 (1):51-63.
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  37.  59
    Neil Levy (2002). Reconsidering Cochlear Implants: The Lessons of Martha's Vineyard. Bioethics 16 (2):134–153.
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  38.  17
    Ze’Ey Levy (1990). Falaguera's Epistle of the Debate. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):113-114.
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  39.  43
    Neil Levy (2013). Are We Agents at All? Helen Steward's Agency Incompatibilism. Inquiry 56 (4):1-14.
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  40.  26
    David M. Levy (1993). "Magic Buffalo" and Berkeley's Theory of Vision: Learning in Society. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 19 (1):223-226.
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  41.  42
    Neil Levy (2007). Agents and Mechanisms: Fischer's Way. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):123–130.
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  42.  24
    Neil Levy (2014). William Hirstein , Mindmelding: Consciousness, Neuroscience, and the Mind's Privacy . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 34 (1-2):75-77.
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  43.  12
    Stephen H. Levy (1982). The Significance of Peirce's Philosophy of Mathematics. Semiotics:483-492.
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  44.  31
    David M. Levy (1993). "Magic Buffalo" and Berkeley's Theory of Vision. Hume Studies 19 (1):223-226.
  45.  8
    Sanford Levy (2015). Michael Huemer’s A Priori Defense of Metaethical Internalism. Philosophia 43 (4):1067-1080.
    Versions of internalism have played important roles in metaethics, for example, in defending irrealist options such as emotivism. However, internalism is itself as controversial as the views it is used to defend. Standard approaches to testing the view, such as thought experiments about amoralists, have failed to gain consensus. Michael Huemer offers a defense of internalism of a different kind which he calls the “argument from interpretation.” He presents the argument as one Humeans could embrace, but versions could be accepted (...)
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  46.  53
    Azriel Levy (1988). Alfred Tarski's Work in Set Theory. Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (1):2-6.
  47. Neil Levy & Timothy J. Bayne (2004). A Will of One's Own: Consciousness, Control, and Character. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27 (5):459-470.
     
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  48.  5
    Donald Levy (1979). The Definition of Love in Plato's "Symposium". Journal of the History of Ideas 40 (2):285.
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  49.  45
    Neil Levy (2010). Introduction: Appiah's Experiments in Ethics. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 3 (3):197-200.
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  50.  13
    Jacob T. Levy (2003). Liberalism's Divide, After Socialism and Before. Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (1):278-297.
    For most of the century and a half that began roughly with the later works of John Stuart Mill, the most important divide within liberal political thought was that between classical liberalism and welfare liberalism. The questions that were important to the socialist/liberal debate also became important for debates within liberalism: What is the relationship between property and freedom? Between free trade and freedom? Is freedom of commercial activity on a moral par with other sorts of freedom? Is the alleviation (...)
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