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  1. Dan Joseph Stein, Jack van Honk & George Ellis (2013). Revenge and Forgiveness in the New South Africa. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):37-38.
    Insofar as South Africa underwent a rapid transformation from apartheid to democracy, it may provide a unique laboratory for investigating aspects of revenge and forgiveness. Here we suggest that observations and data from South Africa are partially consistent with the hypotheses generated by MCullough and colleagues. At the same time, the rich range of revenge and forgiveness phenomena in real-life settings is likely to require explanatory concepts other than specialized modules and their computational outputs.
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  2. David Terburg & Jack van Honk (2013). Approach–Avoidance Versus Dominance–Submissiveness: A Multilevel Neural Framework on How Testosterone Promotes Social Status. Emotion Review 5 (3):296-302.
    Approach–avoidance generally describes appetitive motivation and fear of punishment. In a social context approach motivation is, however, also expressed as social aggression and dominance. We therefore link approach–avoidance to dominance–submissiveness, and provide a neural framework that describes how the steroid hormone testosterone shifts reflexive as well as deliberate behaviors towards dominance and promotion of social status. Testosterone inhibits acute fear at the level of the basolateral amygdala and hypothalamus and promotes reactive dominance through upregulation of vasopressin gene expression in the (...)
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  3. Jack Van Honk, David Terburg & Peter A. Bos (2011). Further Notes on Testosterone as a Social Hormone. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (7):291-292.
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  4. David Terburg, Jiska S. Peper, Barak Morgan & Jack van Honk (2009). Sex Differences in Human Aggression: The Interaction Between Early Developmental and Later Activational Testosterone. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):290 - 290.
    The relation between testosterone levels and aggressive behavior is well established. From an evolutionary viewpoint, testosterone can explain at least part of the sex differences found in aggressive behavior. This explanation, however, is mediated by factors such as prenatal testosterone levels and basal levels of cortisol. Especially regarding sex differences in aggression during adolescence, these mediators have great influence. Based on developmental brain structure research we argue that sex differences in aggression have a pre-pubertal origin and are maintained during adolescence. (...)
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  5. Jack van Honk, Barak E. Morgan & Dennis J. L. G. Schutter (2007). Raw Feeling: A Model for Affective Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):107-108.
    Seeking to unlock the secrets of consciousness, neuroscientists have been studying neural correlates of sensory awareness, such as meaningless randomly moving dots. But in the natural world of species' survival, “raw feelings” mediate conscious adaptive responses. Merker connects the brainstem with vigilance, orientating, and emotional consciousness. However, depending on the brain's phylogenetic level, raw feeling takes particular forms. (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  6. Dan J. Stein, Mark Solms & Jack van Honk (2006). The Cognitive-Affective Neuroscience of the Unconscious. CNS Spectrums 11 (8):580-583.
  7. Jack van Honk & J. L. G. Schutter (2005). Dynamic Brain Systems in Quest for Emotional Homeostasis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):220-221.
    Lewis proposes a solution for bridging the gap between cognitive-psychological and neurobiological theories of emotion in terms of dynamic systems modeling. However, an important brain network is absent in his account: the neuroendocrine system. In this commentary, the dynamic features of the cross-talk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and gonadal (HPG) axes are discussed within a triple-balance model of emotion.
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  8. Dennis J. L. G. Schutter & Jack van Honk (2004). Extending the Global Workspace Theory to Emotion: Phenomenality Without Access. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):539-549.
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  9. Dennis J. L. G. Schutter & Jack van Honk (2004). Schizophrenia: A Disorder of Affective Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):804-805.
    Behrendt & Young (B&Y) propose an explanation for schizophrenia in terms of a cortical default in the interaction between consciousness and cognition. However, schizophrenia more likely involves miscommunication between subcortical and cortical affective circuits in the brain, a default in the interaction between consciousness and emotion. The typical “affective” nature of hallucinations in schizophrenia provides compelling evidence for subcortical involvement.
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  10. Jack van Honk, Dennis J. L. G. Schutter, Erno J. Hermans & Peter Putman (2004). Testosterone, Cortisol, Dominance, and Submission: Biologically Prepared Motivation, No Psychological Mechanisms Involved. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):160-160.
    Mazur & Booth's (1998) target article concerns basal and reciprocal relations between testosterone and dominance, and has its roots in Mazur's (1985; 1994) model of primate dominance-submissiveness interactions. Threats are exchanged in these interactions and a psychological stress-manipulation mechanism is suggested to operate, making sure that face-to-face dominance contests are usually resolved without aggression. In this commentary, a recent line of evidence from human research on the relation between testosterone, cortisol, and vigilant (dominant) and avoidant (submissive) responses to threatening “angry” (...)
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  11. Jack Van Honk, Adriaan Tuiten, Edward de Haan, Marcel van den Hout & Henderickus Stam (2001). Attentional Biases for Angry Faces: Relationships to Trait Anger and Anxiety. Cognition and Emotion 15 (3):279-297.