Search results for 'Jacob Dahi Rendtorff' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Jacob Dahi Rendtorff (2007). The Idea of Corporate Social Responsibility. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:111-117.score: 870.0
    My aim in this analysis is to give a philosophical clarification of the scope of corporate social responsibility within our present market economy. The issue is to what extent social responsibility of the firm is compatible with existing market structures in our present economy. In this context, I will address the conceptions of corporate social responsibility within philosophy, economic theory, and economic sociology. This analysis aims at clarifying the concept of corporate social responsibility within traditional neoclassical economic thought and confronting (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jacob Dahl Rendtorff (2002). Basic Ethical Principles in European Bioethics and Biolaw: Autonomy, Dignity, Integrity and Vulnerability – Towards a Foundation of Bioethics and Biolaw. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):235-244.score: 240.0
    This article summarizes some of the results of the BIOMED II project “Basic Ethical Principles in European Bioethics and Biolaw” (1995–1998)connected to a research project of the Danish Research Councils “Bioethics and Law” (1993–1998). The BIOMED project was based on cooperation between 22 partners in most EU countries. The aim of the project was to identify the ethical principles of respect for autonomy, dignity, integrity and vulnerability as four important ideas or values for a European bioethics and biolaw. The research (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jacob Dahl Rendtorff (2009). Responsibility, Ethics, and Legitimacy of Corporations. International Specialized Book Services [Distributor].score: 240.0
    Business ethics, corporate social responsibility, corporate citizenship, values-driven management, corporate governance, and ethical leadership are necessary ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jacob Dahl Rendtorff (1998). The Second International Conference About Bioethics and Biolaw: European Principles in Bioethics and Biolaw. [REVIEW] Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (3):271-274.score: 240.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jacob Dahl Rendtorff & Peter Kemp (2009). The Barcelona Declaration: Towards an Integrated Approach to Basic Ethical Principles. Synthesis Philosophica 23 (2):239-251.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Peter Høilund, Jacob Rendtorff, Mette Lebech & Peter Kemp (1994). Bioetikkens Grundlag: Overvejelser Over Kroppens Betydning for Bioetik Og Bioret. Philosophia 1.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jacob Dahl Rendtorff & Jan Mattsson (2012). Ethics in the Bank Internet Encounter: An Explorative Study. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 10 (1):36-51.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jacob Dahl Rendtorff (1997). Legislation, Bioethics, Judgement. Rechtstheorie:211-222.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Florian Cova, Emmanuel Dupoux & Pierre Jacob (2010). Moral Evaluation Shapes Linguistic Reports of Others' Psychological States, Not Theory-of-Mind Judgments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):334-335.score: 30.0
    We use psychological concepts (e.g., intention and desire) when we ascribe psychological states to others for purposes of describing, explaining, and predicting their actions. Does the evidence reported by Knobe show, as he thinks, that moral evaluation shapes our mastery of psychological concepts? We argue that the evidence so far shows instead that moral evaluation shapes the way we report, not the way we think about, others' psychological states.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Pierre Jacob (2008). What Do Mirror Neurons Contribute to Human Social Cognition? Mind and Language 23 (2):190–223.score: 30.0
    According to an influential view, one function of mirror neurons (MNs), first discovered in the brain of monkeys, is to underlie third-person mindreading. This view relies on two assumptions: the activity of MNs in an observer’s brain matches (simulates or resonates with) that of MNs in an agent’s brain and this resonance process retrodictively generates a representation of the agent’s intention from a perception of her movement. In this paper, I criticize both assumptions and I argue instead that the activity (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Pierre Jacob (2006). Why Visual Experience is Likely to Resist Being Enacted. Psyche 12 (1).score: 30.0
    Alva Noë’s version of the enactive conception in _Action in Perception_ is an important contribution to the study of visual perception. First, I argue, however, that it is unclear (at best) whether, as the enactivists claim, work on change blindness supports the denial of the existence of detailed visual representations. Second, I elaborate on what Noë calls the ‘puzzle of perceptual presence’. Thirdly, I question the enactivist account of perceptual constancy. Finally, I draw attention to the tensions between enactivism and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Pierre Jacob (1998). What is the Phenomenology of Thought? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):443-448.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Pierre Jacob (2005). Grasping and Perceiving Objects. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 241--283.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Pierre Jacob (1995). Consciousness, Intentionality, and Function: What is the Right Order of Explanation? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):195-200.score: 30.0
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Pierre Jacob (2002). Can Mental Content Explain Behavior? In Languages of the Brain.score: 30.0
  16. Pierre Jacob (2000). Can Selection Explain Content? In Bernard Elevitch (ed.), Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9. Philosophy Doc Ctr. 91-102.score: 30.0
    There are presently three broad approaches the project of naturalizing intentionality: a purely informational approach (Dretske and Fodor), a purely teleological approach (Millikan and Papineau), and a mixed informationally-based teleological approach (Dretske again). I will argue that the last teleosemantic theory offers the most promising approach. I also think, however, that the most explicit version of a pure teleosemantic theory of content, namely Millikan’s admirable theory, faces a pair of objections. My goal in this paper is to spell out Millikan’s (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Alexander Jacob (2005). Ātman: A Reconstruction of the Solar Cosmology of the Indo-Europeans. Olms.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Pierre Jacob, Intentionality. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Intentionality is the power of minds to be about, to represent, or to stand for, things, properties and states of affairs. The puzzles of intentionality lie at the interface between the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language. The word itself, which is of medieval Scholastic origin, was rehabilitated by the philosopher Franz Brentano towards the end of the nineteenth century. ‘Intentionality’ is a philosopher's word. It derives from the Latin word intentio, which in turn derives from the verb (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Pierre Jacob (2002). Some Problems for Reductive Physicalism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):648-654.score: 30.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Pierre Jacob, Frege's Puzzle and Belief Ascriptions.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Pierre Jacob & Marc Jeannerod (2007). Precis of Ways of Seeing. Dialogue 46 (2):335-340.score: 30.0
    This is a summary of the book Ways of Seing co-authord witth Marc Jeannerod and published by Oxford University Press in 2003.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Pierre Jacob (2001). Is Self-Knowledge Compatible with Externalism? Mind and Society 2 (1):59-75.score: 30.0
    Externalism is the view that the contents of many of a person’s propositional attitudes and perhaps sensory experiences are extrinsic properties of the person’s brain: they involve relations between the person’s brain and properties instantiated in his or her present or past environment. Privileged self-knowledge is the view that every human being is able to know directly or non-inferentially, in a way unavailable to anybody else, what he or she thinks or experiences. Now, if what I think (or experience) is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Pierre Jacob (2004). Do We Know How We Know Our Own Minds Yet? In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter.score: 30.0
  24. Pierre Jacob (1990). Externalism Revisited: Is There Such a Thing as Narrow Content? [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 60 (November):143-176.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Pierre Jacob, Do We Know How We Know Our Own Minds Yet?score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Marie-andrée Jacob (2006). Another Look at the Presumed-Versus-Informed Consent Dichotomy in Postmortem Organ Procurement. Bioethics 20 (6):293–300.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Pierre Jacob, Seeing, Perceiving, and Knowing.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Pierre Jacob (2002). The Scope and Limit of Mental Simulation. In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
  29. Pierre Jacob (1997). What Minds Can Do: Intentionality in a Non-Intentional World. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Some of a person's mental states have the power to represent real and imagined states of affairs: they have semantic properties. What Minds Can Do has two goals: to find a naturalistic or non-semantic basis for the representational powers of a person's mind, and to show that these semantic properties are involved in the causal explanation of the person's behaviour. In the process, the book addresses issues that are central to much contemporary philosophical debate. It will be of interest to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Pierre Jacob (1993). Externalism and the Explanatory Relevance of Broad Content. Mind and Language 8 (1):131-156.score: 30.0
  31. Tomas Hellstrom & Merle Jacob (2000). Scientification of Politics or Politicization of Science? Traditionalist Science-Policy Discourse and its Quarrels with Mode 2 Epistemology. Social Epistemology 14 (1):69 – 77.score: 30.0
  32. Pierre Jacob (2009). The Tuning-Fork Model of Human Social Cognition: A Critique☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):229-243.score: 30.0
    The tuning-fork model of human social cognition, based on the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs) in the ventral premotor cortex of monkeys, involves the four following assumptions: (1) mirroring processes are processes of resonance or simulation. (2) They can be motor or non-motor. (3) Processes of motor mirroring (or action-mirroring), exemplified by the activity of MNs, constitute instances of third-person mindreading, whereby an observer represents the agent's intention. (4) Non-motor mirroring processes enable humans to represent others' emotions. After questioning all (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Pierre Jacob (1995). Belief-Attribution and Rationality: A Dilemma for Jerry Fodor. In D. Andler (ed.), Facets of Rationality. Sage Publications. 19--34.score: 30.0
  34. Merle Jacob (1997). Constructing Cultural Identity: The Question of Caribbean Existence. Social Epistemology 11 (1):59 – 68.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Pierre Jacob & Keith Lehrer (2000). Guest Editorial: French Analytic Philosophy Today. Philosophical Studies 100 (3):215-216.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Pierre Jacob (1996). State Consciousness Revisited. Acta Analytica 11 (16):29-54.score: 30.0
  37. Pierre Jacob (1987). Is There a Path Half-Way Between Realism and Verificationism? Synthese 73 (3):531 - 547.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Pierre Jacob (1987). Thoughts and Belief Ascriptions. Mind and Language 2 (4):301-325.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Claus Jacob (2007). The Closure of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Exeter – an Insider's View. Foundations of Chemistry 9 (1):57-64.score: 30.0
  40. Pierre Jacob (1992). Externalism and Mental Causation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 66 (New Series):203-19.score: 30.0
    Argues that externalist content is not causally efficacious, but is relevant to causal explanations of behavior indirectly, via the cognitive activities of others external to the system.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Merle Jacob (2009). On Commodification and the Governance of Academic Research. Minerva 47 (4):391-405.score: 30.0
    The new prominence given to science for economic growth and industry comes with an increased policy focus on the promotion of commodification and commercialization of academic science. This paper posits that this increased interest in commodification is a new steering mechanism for governing science. This is achieved by first outlining what is meant by the commodification of scientific knowledge through reviewing a selection of literatures on the concept of commodification. The paper concludes with a discussion of how commodification functions as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Pierre Jacob (1998). Conceptual Competence and Inadequate Conceptions. Philosophical Issues 9:169-174.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Pierre Jacob (forthcoming). Can Semantic Properties Be Non-Causal? Philosophical Issues.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. A. Jacob (ed.) (1987). Henry More: The Immortality of the Soul. M. Nijhoff.score: 30.0
    Biographical Introduction But for the better Understanding of all this, we are to take ... our Rise a little higher and to premise some things which fell ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Pierre Jacob & Marc Jeannerod (2007). Reply to Our Critics. Dialogue 46 (2):361-368.score: 30.0
    Marc Jeannerod and I wrote a Précis of our 2003 book Ways of Seeing. The journal Dialogue asked Tim Schroeder, Alva Noë, Pierre Poirier and Martin Ratte to write a critical essay on our book. In this piece, we reply to our critics.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Pierre Jacob (1998). What Can the Semantic Properties of Innate Representations Explain? In J. A. M. Bransen & S. E. Cuypers (eds.), Human Action, Deliberation and Causation. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 175--197.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Pierre Jacob (1995). Can Semantic Properties Be Non-Causal? Philosophical Issues 6:44-51.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. J. M. Jacob (1982). Changing Practice on Confidentiality: A Cause for Concern. Commentary 1: Confidentiality: The Dangers of Anything Weaker Than the Medical Ethic. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (1):18-21.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Margaret Candee Jacob (1969). John Toland and the Newtonian Ideology. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 32:307-331.score: 30.0
  50. Claus Jacob (2002). Philosophy and Biochemistry: Research at the Interface Between Chemistry and Biology. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (2):97-125.score: 30.0
    This paper investigates the interface between philosophy and biochemistry. While it is problematic to justify the application of a particular philosophical model to biochemistry, it seems to be even more difficult to develop a special “Philosophy for Biochemistry”. Alternatively, philosophy can be used in biochemistry based on an alternative approach that involves an interdependent iteration process at a philosophical and (bio)chemical level (“Exeter Method”). This useful iteration method supplements more abstract approaches at the interface between philosophy and natural sciences, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000