Search results for 'Jacob Hale' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Jacob Hale (1996). Are Lesbians Women? Hypatia 11 (2):94 - 121.score: 240.0
    I argue that Monique Wittig's view that lesbians are not women neglects the complexities involved in the composition of the category "woman." I develop an articulation of the concept "woman" in the contemporary United States, with thirteen distinct defining characteristics, none of which are necessary nor sufficient. I argue that Wittig's emphasis on the material production of "woman" through the political regime of heterosexuality, however, is enormously fruitful for feminist and queer strategizing.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. C. Jacob Hale (2008). Sex Change, Social Change: Reflections on Identity, Institutions, and Imperialism by Viviane Namaste. Hypatia 23 (1):204-207.score: 240.0
  3. C. Jacob Hale (2007). Sex Change, Social Change: Reflections on Identity, Institutions, and Imperialism (Review). Hypatia 23 (1):204-207.score: 240.0
  4. Bob Hale (1999). Intuition and Reflection in Arithmetic: Bob Hale. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):75–98.score: 210.0
    [Michael Potter] If arithmetic is not analytic in Kant's sense, what is its subject matter? Answers to this question can be classified into four sorts according as they posit logic, experience, thought or the world as the source, but in each case we need to appeal to some further process if we are to generate a structure rich enough to represent arithmetic as standardly practised. I speculate that this further process is our reflection on the subject matter already obtained. This (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Brenda Hale & Rosemary Hunter (2008). A Conversation with Baroness Hale. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (2):237-248.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Bob Hale (2010). Still Inexplicit? Bob Hale and Crispin Wright. In Bernhard Weiss & Jeremy Wanderer (eds.), Reading Brandom: On Making It Explicit. Routledge. 276.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2008). Abstraction and Additional Nature. Philosophia Mathematica 16 (2):182-208.score: 60.0
    What is wrong with abstraction’, Michael Potter and Peter Sullivan explain a further objection to the abstractionist programme in the foundations of mathematics which they first presented in their ‘Hale on Caesar’ and which they believe our discussion in The Reason's Proper Study misunderstood. The aims of the present note are: To get the character of this objection into sharper focus; To explore further certain of the assumptions—primarily, about reference-fixing in mathematics, about certain putative limitations of abstractionist set theory, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Bob Hale (2011). Erratum To: The Bearable Lightness of Being. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 21 (4):597-597.score: 60.0
    Erratum to: The Bearable Lightness of Being Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10516-010-9127-7 Authors Bob Hale, Department of Philosophy, University of Sheffield, 45 Victoria St, Sheffield, S3 7QB UK Journal Axiomathes Online ISSN 1572-8390 Print ISSN 1122-1151.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Bob Hale (ed.) (2001). The Reason's Proper Study: Essays Towards a Neo-Fregean Philosophy of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Here, Bob Hale and Crispin Wright assemble the key writings that lead to their distinctive neo-Fregean approach to the philosophy of mathematics. In addition to fourteen previously published papers, the volume features a new paper on the Julius Caesar problem; a substantial new introduction mapping out the program and the contributions made to it by the various papers; a section explaining which issues most require further attention; and bibliographies of references and further useful sources. It will be recognized as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Bob Hale (2013). Review of G. Duke: Dummett on Abstract Objects. [REVIEW] Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 2 (2).score: 60.0
    Review of G. Duke: Dummett onObjects References G. Frege. Über Sinn und Bedeutung. Zeitschrift für Philosophie und philosophische Kritik, 100, 25–50, 1892. Translated in G.Frege, Collected Papers on Mathematics, Logic and Philosophy, edited by B. McGuinness. Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 157–77. G. Frege. Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik. Breslau, Verlag von W. Koebner, 1884. Translated by J.L. Austin as The Foundations of Arithmetic, Oxford, Basil Blackwell, second revised edition 1953. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy of Language. London, Duckworth, 1973. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Bob Hale (2013). Necessary Beings: An Essay on Ontology, Modality, and the Relations Between Them. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    Bob Hale presents a broadly Fregean approach to metaphysics, according to which ontology and modality are mutually dependent upon one another. He argues that facts about what kinds of things exist depend on facts about what is possible. Modal facts are fundamental, and have their basis in the essences of things--not in meanings or concepts.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2002). Benacerraf's Dilemma Revisited. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):101–129.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Benjamin Hale (2009). What's so Moral About the Moral Hazard? Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (1):1-26.score: 30.0
    A "moral hazard" is a market failure most commonly associated with insurance, but also associated by extension with a wide variety of public policy scenarios, from environmental disaster relief, to corporate bailouts, to natural resource policy, to health insurance. Specifically, the term "moral hazard" describes the danger that, in the face of insurance, an agent will increase her exposure to risk. If not immediately clear, such terminology invokes a moral notion, suggesting that changing one's exposure to risk after becoming insured (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Pierre Jacob (2008). What Do Mirror Neurons Contribute to Human Social Cognition? Mind and Language 23 (2):190–223.score: 30.0
    According to an influential view, one function of mirror neurons (MNs), first discovered in the brain of monkeys, is to underlie third-person mindreading. This view relies on two assumptions: the activity of MNs in an observer’s brain matches (simulates or resonates with) that of MNs in an agent’s brain and this resonance process retrodictively generates a representation of the agent’s intention from a perception of her movement. In this paper, I criticize both assumptions and I argue instead that the activity (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Bob Hale (2002). Knowledge of Possibility and of Necessity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):1–20.score: 30.0
    I investigate two asymmetrical approaches to knowledge of absolute possibility and of necessity--one which treats knowledge of possibility as more fundamental, the other according epistemological priority to necessity. Two necessary conditions for the success of an asymmetrical approach are proposed. I argue that a possibility-based approach seems unable to meet my second condition, but that on certain assumptions--including, pivotally, the assumption that logical and conceptual necessities, while absolute, do not exhaust the class of absolute necessities--a necessity-based approach may be able (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Crispin Wright & Bob Hale (1992). Nominalism and the Contingency of Abstract Objects. Journal of Philosophy 89 (3):111-135.score: 30.0
  17. Bob Hale (1996). Absolute Necessities. Philosophical Perspectives 10:93 - 117.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (eds.) (1997). A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Pub..score: 30.0
    Written by an international assembly of leading philosophers, this volume provides a survey of contemporary philosophy of language.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Bob Hale (1999). On Some Arguments for the Necessity of Necessity. Mind 108 (429):23-52.score: 30.0
    Must we believe in logical necessity? I examine an argument for an affirmative answer given by Ian McFetridge in his posthumously published paper 'Logical Necessity: Some Issues', and explain why it fails, as it stands, to establish his conclusion. I contend, however, that McFetridge's argument can be effectively buttressed by drawing upon another argument aimed at establishing that we ought to believe that some propositions are logically necessary, given by Crispin Wright in his paper 'Inventing Logical necessity'. My contention is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Pierre Jacob (2006). Why Visual Experience is Likely to Resist Being Enacted. Psyche 12 (1).score: 30.0
    Alva Noë’s version of the enactive conception in _Action in Perception_ is an important contribution to the study of visual perception. First, I argue, however, that it is unclear (at best) whether, as the enactivists claim, work on change blindness supports the denial of the existence of detailed visual representations. Second, I elaborate on what Noë calls the ‘puzzle of perceptual presence’. Thirdly, I question the enactivist account of perceptual constancy. Finally, I draw attention to the tensions between enactivism and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Benjamin Hale (2008). Do Animals Have Rights? – Alison Hills. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):379–382.score: 30.0
  22. Bob Hale (2004). Putnam's Retreat: Some Reflections on Hilary Putnam's Changing Views About Metaphysical Necessity. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):351–378.score: 30.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Pierre Jacob (1998). What is the Phenomenology of Thought? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):443-448.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Pierre Jacob (2005). Grasping and Perceiving Objects. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 241--283.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2009). Focus Restored: Comments on John MacFarlane. Synthese 170 (3):457 - 482.score: 30.0
    In “Double Vision Two Questions about the Neo-Fregean Programme”, John MacFarlane’s raises two main questions: (1) Why is it so important to neo-Fregeans to treat expressions of the form ‘the number of Fs’ as a species of singular term? What would be lost, if anything, if they were analysed instead as a type of quantifier-phrase, as on Russell’s Theory of Definite Descriptions? and (2) Granting—at least for the sake of argument—that Hume’s Principle may be used as a means of implicitly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Pierre Jacob (1995). Consciousness, Intentionality, and Function: What is the Right Order of Explanation? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):195-200.score: 30.0
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Pierre Jacob (2002). Can Mental Content Explain Behavior? In Languages of the Brain.score: 30.0
  28. Benjamin Hale (2008). Technology, the Environment, and the Moral Considerability of Artifacts. In Evan Selinger, Jan Kyrre Berg Olson & Soren Riis (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Technology. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
  29. Alexander Jacob (2005). Ātman: A Reconstruction of the Solar Cosmology of the Indo-Europeans. Olms.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Pierre Jacob, Intentionality. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Intentionality is the power of minds to be about, to represent, or to stand for, things, properties and states of affairs. The puzzles of intentionality lie at the interface between the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language. The word itself, which is of medieval Scholastic origin, was rehabilitated by the philosopher Franz Brentano towards the end of the nineteenth century. ‘Intentionality’ is a philosopher's word. It derives from the Latin word intentio, which in turn derives from the verb (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Pierre Jacob (2002). Some Problems for Reductive Physicalism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):648-654.score: 30.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Pierre Jacob, Frege's Puzzle and Belief Ascriptions.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Bob Hale (2002). Can Arboreal Knotwork Help Blackburn Out of Frege's Abyss? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):144–149.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Bob Hale (2006). The Limits of Abstraction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (1):223–232.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Pierre Jacob (2000). Can Selection Explain Content? In Bernard Elevitch (ed.), Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9. Philosophy Doc Ctr. 91-102.score: 30.0
    There are presently three broad approaches the project of naturalizing intentionality: a purely informational approach (Dretske and Fodor), a purely teleological approach (Millikan and Papineau), and a mixed informationally-based teleological approach (Dretske again). I will argue that the last teleosemantic theory offers the most promising approach. I also think, however, that the most explicit version of a pure teleosemantic theory of content, namely Millikan’s admirable theory, faces a pair of objections. My goal in this paper is to spell out Millikan’s (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Pierre Jacob (2001). Is Self-Knowledge Compatible with Externalism? Mind and Society 2 (1):59-75.score: 30.0
    Externalism is the view that the contents of many of a person’s propositional attitudes and perhaps sensory experiences are extrinsic properties of the person’s brain: they involve relations between the person’s brain and properties instantiated in his or her present or past environment. Privileged self-knowledge is the view that every human being is able to know directly or non-inferentially, in a way unavailable to anybody else, what he or she thinks or experiences. Now, if what I think (or experience) is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Pierre Jacob & Marc Jeannerod (2007). Precis of Ways of Seeing. Dialogue 46 (2):335-340.score: 30.0
    This is a summary of the book Ways of Seing co-authord witth Marc Jeannerod and published by Oxford University Press in 2003.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Bob Hale (2000). Reals by Abstractiont. Philosophia Mathematica 8 (2):100--123.score: 30.0
    On the neo-Fregean approach to the foundations of mathematics, elementary arithmetic is analytic in the sense that the addition of a principle wliich may be held to IMJ explanatory of the concept of cardinal number to a suitable second-order logical basis suffices for the derivation of its basic laws. This principle, now commonly called Hume's principle, is an example of a Fregean abstraction principle. In this paper, I assume the correctness of the neo-Fregean position on elementary aritlunetic and seek to (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Pierre Jacob (2004). Do We Know How We Know Our Own Minds Yet? In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter.score: 30.0
  40. Pierre Jacob (1990). Externalism Revisited: Is There Such a Thing as Narrow Content? [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 60 (November):143-176.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Pierre Jacob, Do We Know How We Know Our Own Minds Yet?score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Pierre Jacob, Seeing, Perceiving, and Knowing.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Pierre Jacob (2002). The Scope and Limit of Mental Simulation. In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
  44. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (1994). A Reductio Ad Surdum? Field on the Contingency of Mathematical Objects. Mind 103 (410):169-184.score: 30.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Benjamin Hale & Lauren Hale (2009). Choosing to Sleep. In Angus Dawson (ed.), The Philosophy of Public Health. Ashgate.score: 30.0
    In this paper we claim that individual subjects do not have so much control over sleep that it is aptly characterized as a personal choice; and that normative implications related to public health and sleep hygiene do not necessarily follow from current findings. It should be true of any empirical study that normative implications do not necessarily follow, but we think that many public health sleep recommendations falsely infer these implications from a flawed explanatory account of the decision to sleep: (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Bob Hale (2002). Real Numbers, Quantities, and Measurement. Philosophia Mathematica 10 (3):304-323.score: 30.0
    Defining the real numbers by abstraction as ratios of quantities gives prominence to then- applications in just the way that Frege thought we should. But if all the reals are to be obtained in this way, it is necessary to presuppose a rich domain of quantities of a land we cannot reasonably assume to be exemplified by any physical or other empirically measurable quantities. In consequence, an explanation of the applications of the reals, defined in this way, must proceed indirectly. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Bob Hale (1984). Frege's Platonism. Philosophical Quarterly 34 (136):225-241.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Marie-andrée Jacob (2006). Another Look at the Presumed-Versus-Informed Consent Dichotomy in Postmortem Organ Procurement. Bioethics 20 (6):293–300.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Pierre Jacob (1997). What Minds Can Do: Intentionality in a Non-Intentional World. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Some of a person's mental states have the power to represent real and imagined states of affairs: they have semantic properties. What Minds Can Do has two goals: to find a naturalistic or non-semantic basis for the representational powers of a person's mind, and to show that these semantic properties are involved in the causal explanation of the person's behaviour. In the process, the book addresses issues that are central to much contemporary philosophical debate. It will be of interest to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Bob Hale (1997). Grundlagen §64. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (3):243–261.score: 30.0
1 — 50 / 1000