Search results for 'Jacob Holsinger Sherman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jacob Holsinger Sherman (2010). Nick Trakakis the End of Philosophy of Religion . (London: Continuum, 2009). Pp. VII+173. £60.00 (Hbk). Isbn 9781847065346. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 46 (3):415-420.score: 870.0
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  2. Jacob Holsinger Sherman (2009). NO WEREWOLVES IN THEOLOGY?: TRANSCENDENCE, IMMANENCE, AND BECOMING-DIVINE IN GILLES DELEUZE. Modern Theology 25 (1):1-20.score: 870.0
    This essay adds a theological voice to the current debate over the legacy of Gilles Deleuze. It discusses Peter Hallward's charge that Deleuze is best read as a mystical, theophanic philosopher who values creativity to the detriment of real creatures. It argues that while Hallward is right to discern a flight from bodies, relations, and politics in Deleuze, this is due not to Deleuze's contemplative mysticism, but rather to his strident rejection of any transcendence. The essay then draws upon Thomas (...)
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  3. Jorge N. Ferrer & Jacob H. Sherman (eds.) (2008). The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies. State University of New York Press.score: 240.0
    The contributors to this volume argue that we can, and they offer a new way: the "participatory turn," which proposes that individuals and communities have an ...
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  4. Jacob Sherman (2010). Metaphysics and the Redemption of Sacrifice: On René Girard and Charles Williams. Heythrop Journal 51 (1):45-59.score: 240.0
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  5. Jacob Sherman (2011). Night Operation. By Owen Barfield and Eager Spring. By Owen Barfield. Heythrop Journal 52 (6):1068-1070.score: 240.0
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  6. Deborah P. Britzman, Robert R. Sherman, Malcolm B. Campbell, Jacob L. Susskind, Robert O. Riggs, David B. Bills, Cheryl L. Sattler & John H. Lockwood (1994). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 25 (4):273-282.score: 240.0
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  7. Jorge N. Ferrer & Jacob H. Sherman (forthcoming). The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism. Religious Studies.score: 240.0
     
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  8. Jacob H. Sherman (2008). A Genealogy of Participation. In Jorge N. Ferrer & Jacob H. Sherman (eds.), The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies. State University of New York Press.score: 240.0
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  9. Nancy Sherman (2009). The Fate of a Warrior Culture: Nancy Sherman on Jonathan Lear's "Radical Hope" (Harvard: 2006). Philosophical Studies 144 (1):71 - 80.score: 180.0
    Jonathan Lear in "Radical Hope" tackles the idea of cultural devastation, in the specific case of the Crow Indians. What do we mean by "annihilation" of a culture? The moral point of view that he imagines as he reconstructs the eve and aftermath of this annihilation is not second personal, of obligation, but first personal, in the collective and singular, as told by the Crows, with Lear as "analyst." "Radical Hope" is a study of representative character of a people—of virtue, (...)
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  10. Ellen Goldberg (2010). Review of The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies, Edited by Jorge N. Ferrer and Jacob H. Sherman. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (2):309-310.score: 140.0
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  11. Nancy Sherman (1989). The Fabric of Character: Aristotle's Theory of Virtue. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Most traditional accounts of Aristotle's theory of ethical education neglect its cognitive aspects. This book asserts that, in Aristotle's view, excellence of character comprises both the sentiments and practical reason. Sherman focuses particularly on four aspects of practical reason as they relate to character: moral perception, choicemaking, collaboration, and the development of those capacities in moral education. Throughout the book, she is sensitive to contemporary moral debates, and indicates the extent to which Aristotle's account of practical reason provides an (...)
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  12. Brett Sherman & Gilbert Harman (2011). Knowledge and Assumptions. Philosophical Studies 156 (1):131--140.score: 60.0
    Knowledge and assumptions Content Type Journal Article Pages 131-140 DOI 10.1007/s11098-011-9797-z Authors Brett Sherman, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA Gilbert Harman, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116 Journal Volume Volume 156 Journal Issue Volume 156, Number 1.
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  13. Nancy Sherman (1997). Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This book is the first to offer a detailed analysis of Aristotelian and Kantian ethics together, in a way that remains faithful to the texts and responsive to debates in contemporary ethics. Recent moral philosophy has seen a revival of interest in the concept of virtue, and with it a reassessment of the role of virtue in the work of Aristotle and Kant. This book brings that re-assessment to a new level of sophistication. Nancy Sherman argues that Kant preserves (...)
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  14. Julia A. Sherman (2006). Bipolar Disorder Evolved as an Adaptation to Severe Climate. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):421-422.score: 60.0
    Keller & Miller (K&M) assert that mental disorders could not have evolved as adaptations, but they fail to make their case against the theory of the evolutionary origin of bipolar disorder that I have proposed (Sherman 2001). Such an idea may be unorthodox, but it has considerable explanatory power and heuristic value. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  15. David Sherman (2007). Sartre and Adorno: The Dialectics of Subjectivity. Suny Press.score: 60.0
    Focusing on the notion of the subject in Sartre's and Adorno's philosophies, David Sherman argues that they offer complementary accounts of the subject that ...
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  16. Nancy Sherman (2005). Stoic Warriors: The Ancient Philosophy Behind the Military Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    While few soldiers may have read the works of Epictetus or Marcus Aurelius, it is undoubtedly true that the ancient philosophy known as Stoicism guides the actions of many in the military. Soldiers and seamen learn early in their training "to suck it up," to endure, to put aside their feelings and to get on with the mission. Stoic Warriors is the first book to delve deeply into the ancient legacy of this relationship, exploring what the Stoic philosophy actually is, (...)
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  17. Pierre Jacob (2008). What Do Mirror Neurons Contribute to Human Social Cognition? Mind and Language 23 (2):190–223.score: 30.0
    According to an influential view, one function of mirror neurons (MNs), first discovered in the brain of monkeys, is to underlie third-person mindreading. This view relies on two assumptions: the activity of MNs in an observer’s brain matches (simulates or resonates with) that of MNs in an agent’s brain and this resonance process retrodictively generates a representation of the agent’s intention from a perception of her movement. In this paper, I criticize both assumptions and I argue instead that the activity (...)
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  18. Pierre Jacob (2006). Why Visual Experience is Likely to Resist Being Enacted. Psyche 12 (1).score: 30.0
    Alva Noë’s version of the enactive conception in _Action in Perception_ is an important contribution to the study of visual perception. First, I argue, however, that it is unclear (at best) whether, as the enactivists claim, work on change blindness supports the denial of the existence of detailed visual representations. Second, I elaborate on what Noë calls the ‘puzzle of perceptual presence’. Thirdly, I question the enactivist account of perceptual constancy. Finally, I draw attention to the tensions between enactivism and (...)
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  19. Gilbert Harman & Brett Sherman (2004). Knowledge, Assumptions, Lotteries. Philosophical Issues 14 (1):492–500.score: 30.0
    John Hawthorne’s marvelous book contains a wealth of arguments and insights based on an impressive knowledge and understanding of contemporary discussion. We can address only a small aspect of the topic. In particular, we will offer our own answers to two questions about knowledge that he discusses.
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  20. Pierre Jacob (1998). What is the Phenomenology of Thought? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):443-448.score: 30.0
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  21. Pierre Jacob (1995). Consciousness, Intentionality, and Function: What is the Right Order of Explanation? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):195-200.score: 30.0
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  22. Pierre Jacob (2005). Grasping and Perceiving Objects. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 241--283.score: 30.0
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  23. Pierre Jacob (2001). Is Self-Knowledge Compatible with Externalism? Mind and Society 2 (1):59-75.score: 30.0
    Externalism is the view that the contents of many of a person’s propositional attitudes and perhaps sensory experiences are extrinsic properties of the person’s brain: they involve relations between the person’s brain and properties instantiated in his or her present or past environment. Privileged self-knowledge is the view that every human being is able to know directly or non-inferentially, in a way unavailable to anybody else, what he or she thinks or experiences. Now, if what I think (or experience) is (...)
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  24. Pierre Jacob (2002). Can Mental Content Explain Behavior? In Languages of the Brain.score: 30.0
  25. Pierre Jacob (2000). Can Selection Explain Content? In Bernard Elevitch (ed.), Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9. Philosophy Doc Ctr. 91-102.score: 30.0
    There are presently three broad approaches the project of naturalizing intentionality: a purely informational approach (Dretske and Fodor), a purely teleological approach (Millikan and Papineau), and a mixed informationally-based teleological approach (Dretske again). I will argue that the last teleosemantic theory offers the most promising approach. I also think, however, that the most explicit version of a pure teleosemantic theory of content, namely Millikan’s admirable theory, faces a pair of objections. My goal in this paper is to spell out Millikan’s (...)
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  26. Pierre Jacob, Intentionality. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Intentionality is the power of minds to be about, to represent, or to stand for, things, properties and states of affairs. The puzzles of intentionality lie at the interface between the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language. The word itself, which is of medieval Scholastic origin, was rehabilitated by the philosopher Franz Brentano towards the end of the nineteenth century. ‘Intentionality’ is a philosopher's word. It derives from the Latin word intentio, which in turn derives from the verb (...)
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  27. James Sherman (2010). A New Instrumental Theory of Rights. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):215 - 228.score: 30.0
    My goal in this paper is to advance a long-standing debate about the nature of moral rights. The debate focuses on the questions: In virtue of what do persons possess moral rights? What could explain the fact that they possess moral rights? The predominant sides in this debate are the status theory and the instrumental theory. I aim to develop and defend a new instrumental theory. I take as my point of departure the influential view of Joseph Raz, which (...)
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  28. Alexander Jacob (2005). Ātman: A Reconstruction of the Solar Cosmology of the Indo-Europeans. Olms.score: 30.0
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  29. Pierre Jacob (2002). Some Problems for Reductive Physicalism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):648-654.score: 30.0
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  30. Pierre Jacob, Frege's Puzzle and Belief Ascriptions.score: 30.0
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  31. Nancy Sherman (2009). The Fate of a Warrior Culture. Philosophical Studies 144 (1):71 - 80.score: 30.0
    Jonathan Lear in Radical Hope tackles the idea of cultural devastation, in the specific case of the Crow Indians. What do we mean by “annihilation” of a culture? The moral point of view that he imagines as he reconstructs the eve and aftermath of this annihilation is not second personal, of obligation, but first personal, in the collective and singular, as told by the Crows, with Lear as “analyst.” Radical Hope is a study of representative character of a people—of virtue, (...)
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  32. Pierre Jacob & Marc Jeannerod (2007). Precis of Ways of Seeing. Dialogue 46 (2):335-340.score: 30.0
    This is a summary of the book Ways of Seing co-authord witth Marc Jeannerod and published by Oxford University Press in 2003.
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  33. Pierre Jacob (2004). Do We Know How We Know Our Own Minds Yet? In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter.score: 30.0
  34. Pierre Jacob (1990). Externalism Revisited: Is There Such a Thing as Narrow Content? [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 60 (November):143-176.score: 30.0
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  35. Nancy Sherman (1987). Aristotle on Friendship and the Shared Life. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (4):589-613.score: 30.0
    IN THIS PAPER I CONSIDER THE VALUE OF FRIENDSHIP FROM AN ARISTOTELIAN POINT OF VIEW. THE ISSUE IS OF CURRENT INTEREST GIVEN RECENT CHALLENGES TO IMPARTIALIST ETHICS TO TAKE MORE SERIOUSLY THE COMMITMENTS AND ATTACHMENTS OF A PERSON. HOWEVER, I ENTER THAT DEBATE IN ONLY A RESTRICTED WAY BY STRENGTHENING THE CHALLENGE ARTICULATED IN ARISTOTLE'S SYSTEMATIC DEFENSE OF FRIENDSHIP AND THE SHARED LIFE. AFTER SOME INTRODUCTORY REMARKS, I BEGIN BY CONSIDERING ARISTOTLE'S NOTION THAT GOOD LIVING OR HAPPINESS ("EUDAIMONIA") FOR AN (...)
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  36. Pierre Jacob, Do We Know How We Know Our Own Minds Yet?score: 30.0
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  37. Marie-andrée Jacob (2006). Another Look at the Presumed-Versus-Informed Consent Dichotomy in Postmortem Organ Procurement. Bioethics 20 (6):293–300.score: 30.0
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  38. Pierre Jacob, Seeing, Perceiving, and Knowing.score: 30.0
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  39. Pierre Jacob (2002). The Scope and Limit of Mental Simulation. In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
  40. Pierre Jacob (1997). What Minds Can Do: Intentionality in a Non-Intentional World. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Some of a person's mental states have the power to represent real and imagined states of affairs: they have semantic properties. What Minds Can Do has two goals: to find a naturalistic or non-semantic basis for the representational powers of a person's mind, and to show that these semantic properties are involved in the causal explanation of the person's behaviour. In the process, the book addresses issues that are central to much contemporary philosophical debate. It will be of interest to (...)
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  41. Pierre Jacob (1993). Externalism and the Explanatory Relevance of Broad Content. Mind and Language 8 (1):131-156.score: 30.0
  42. Nancy Sherman (1999). Taking Responsibility for Our Emotions. Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (02):294-.score: 30.0
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  43. Tomas Hellstrom & Merle Jacob (2000). Scientification of Politics or Politicization of Science? Traditionalist Science-Policy Discourse and its Quarrels with Mode 2 Epistemology. Social Epistemology 14 (1):69 – 77.score: 30.0
  44. Nancy Sherman (1998). Empathy and Imagination. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):82-119.score: 30.0
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  45. Pierre Jacob (2009). The Tuning-Fork Model of Human Social Cognition: A Critique☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):229-243.score: 30.0
    The tuning-fork model of human social cognition, based on the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs) in the ventral premotor cortex of monkeys, involves the four following assumptions: (1) mirroring processes are processes of resonance or simulation. (2) They can be motor or non-motor. (3) Processes of motor mirroring (or action-mirroring), exemplified by the activity of MNs, constitute instances of third-person mindreading, whereby an observer represents the agent's intention. (4) Non-motor mirroring processes enable humans to represent others' emotions. After questioning all (...)
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  46. Pierre Jacob (1995). Belief-Attribution and Rationality: A Dilemma for Jerry Fodor. In D. Andler (ed.), Facets of Rationality. Sage Publications. 19--34.score: 30.0
  47. Merle Jacob (1997). Constructing Cultural Identity: The Question of Caribbean Existence. Social Epistemology 11 (1):59 – 68.score: 30.0
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  48. Pierre Jacob & Keith Lehrer (2000). Guest Editorial: French Analytic Philosophy Today. Philosophical Studies 100 (3):215-216.score: 30.0
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  49. Pierre Jacob (1996). State Consciousness Revisited. Acta Analytica 11 (16):29-54.score: 30.0
  50. Edward Sherman (2005). Authenticity and Diversity: A Comparative Reading of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger. Dialogue 44 (1):145-160.score: 30.0
    Authenticity and diversity have both become catch words in contemporary North Atlantic societies. What has not, however, been widely explored is the interrelation ofthese two ideas. To this end, the present article takes up the sometime convergent, sometime divergent writings of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger, drawing out their thoughts on authenticity and showing how they can serve as a ground for a new form of cultural diversity. For both, authentic being-in-the-world affords us access to our own deep reservoir of (...)
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