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Jacob T. Levy [17]Jacob Levy [6]
  1. Jacob T. Levy, Multicultural Manners.
    The political theory literature on multiculturalism is dominated by approaches based on rights and recognition -- quintessentially 17th- and 19th-century concepts, respectively. In this paper I aim to complement those approaches with one drawing on the 18th-century concept of manners. A range of cases of cultural contact and conflict -- especially those in the up-close settings of city life, and especially those having to do with contrasting cultural norms about seeing and being seen -- do not admit of wholly satisfactory (...)
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  2. Jacob T. Levy, Not So.
    Social contract theory imagines political societies as resting on a fundamental agreement, adopted at a discrete moment in hypothetical time, that both bound individual persons together into a single polity and set fundamental rules regarding that polity's structure and powers. Written constitutions, adopted at real moments in historical time, dictating governmental structures, bounding governmental powers, and entrenching individual rights, look temptingly like social contracts reified. I argue in this article, however, that something essential is lost in the casual slippage between (...)
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  3. Jacob T. Levy, What It Means to Be a Pluralist.
    Michael Walzer has made great contributions to the appreciation of both moral and cultural pluralism in political theory. Nonetheless, there are ways in which Walzer's arguments appear anti-pluralistic. The question of this essay is: why is there so little pluralism in Walzer's political theory, or why does its pluralism run out so soon? Focusing on Spheres of Justice and Nation and Universe, it examines the effect of Walzer's nationalism/statism on his theory, and the constraints his theory faces in considering multiculturalism (...)
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  4. Jacob T. Levy (forthcoming). Lon Fuller-Professor of Jurisprudence at Harvard. Jurisprudence.
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  5. Andrew Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (eds.) (2012). The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: Essential Readings: Ancient, Modern, and Contemporary Texts. Broadview Press.
    This volume features a careful selection of major works in political and social philosophy from ancient times through to the present. Every reading has been painstakingly annotated, and each figure is given a substantial introduction highlighting his or her major contribution to the tradition. The anthology offers both depth and breadth in its selection of material by central figures, while also representing other currents of political thought. Thirty-two authors are represented, including fourteen from the 20th century. The editors have made (...)
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  6. Andrew Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy & Alex Sager (2009). Adorno, Theodor W. Edited by Rolf Tiedemann. 2008. Lectures on Negative Dialectics: Fragments of a Lecture Course, 1965/1966. Translated by Rodney Livingstone. Cambridge: Polity Press. Xix+ 267 Pp. Allison, Henry E. 2008. Custom and Reason in Hume: A Kantian Reading of the First Book of the Treatise. Oxford: Clarendon Press. Xi+ 412 Pp. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 118 (3).
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  7. Jacob T. Levy (2009). Not So Novus an Ordo: Constitutions Without Social Contracts. Political Theory 37 (2):191 - 217.
    Social contract theory imagines political societies as resting on a fundamental agreement, adopted at a discrete moment in hypothetical time, that binds individual persons together into a polity and sets fundamental rules regarding that polity's structure and powers. Written constitutions, adopted at real moments in historical time, dictating governmental structures, bounding governmental powers, and entrenching individual rights, look temptingly like social contracts reified. Yet something essential is lost in this slippage between social contract theory and the practice of constitutionalism. Contractarian (...)
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  8. Roger T. Ames, Peter D. Hershock, Andrew Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (2008). Bonner, Anthony. The Art and Logic of Ramon Llull: A User's Guide. Studien Und Texte Zur Geistesge-Schichte des Mittelalters, 95. Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2007. Pp. Xx+ 333. Cloth, $150.00. Boros, Gábor, Herman De Dijn, and Martin Moors, Editors. The Concept of Love in 17th and 18th Century Philosophy. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2007. Pp. 269. Paper,€ 35.50. Boulnois, Olivier. Au-Delà de l'Image, Une Archéologie du Visual au Moyen Âge, Ve-XVIe Siècle. Paris: Des. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):653-56.
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  9. Andrew Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (eds.) (2008). The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: Volume 2: The Twentieth Century and Beyond. Broadview Press.
    This comprehensive volume contains much of the important work in political and social philosophy from ancient times until the end of the nineteenth century. The anthology offers both depth and breadth in its selection of material by central figures, while also representing other currents of political thought. Thucydides, Seneca, and Cicero are included along with Plato and Aristotle; Al-Farabi, Marsilius of Padua, and de Pizan take their place alongside Augustine and Aquinas; Astell and Constant are presented in the company of (...)
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  10. Andrew Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (eds.) (2008). The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: Volume 1: From Plato to Nietzsche. Broadview Press.
    This comprehensive volume contains much of the important work in political and social philosophy from ancient times until the end of the nineteenth century. The anthology offers both depth and breadth in its selection of material by central figures, while also representing other currents of political thought. Thucydides, Seneca, and Cicero are included along with Plato and Aristotle; Al-Farabi, Marsilius of Padua, and de Pizan take their place alongside Augustine and Aquinas; Astell and Constant are presented in the company of (...)
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  11. Jacob T. Levy (2008). National and Statist Responsibility. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (4):485-499.
    In this article, part of a symposium on David Miller's Global Justice and National Responsibility, I first focus on an area of disagreement: Miller‘s attempt to attribute to nations responsibility that I think ought to be generally attributed to states. I then sketch a theory that disregards nations more or less completely, and yet issues in a two-level theory like Miller‘s, sanctioning important differences between intrastate and interstate distribution. It is only like Miller‘s, because the distinction between states and (...)
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  12. Jacob T. Levy (2008). Self-Determination, Non-Domination, and Federalism. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 60-78.
    This article summarizes the theory of federalism as non-domination Iris Marion Young began to develop in her final years, a theory of self-government that tried to recognize interconnectedness. Levy also poses an objection to that theory: non-domination cannot do the work Young needed of it, because it is a theory about the merits of decisions not about jurisdiction over them. The article concludes with an attempt to give Young the last word.
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  13. Jacob T. Levy (2007). Federalism and the Old and New Liberalisms. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (1):306-326.
    The transition from a relatively federal to a relatively centralized constitutional structure in the United States has often been identified with the shift from classical to welfare liberalism as a matter of public philosophy. This article argues against that distinction. The liberal argument for federalism is a contingent one, built on approximations, counterbalancing, and political power. A more federalist constitution is not automatically a freer one on classical liberal understandings of freedom. Neither is a more centralized constitution automatically a better (...)
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  14. Jacob T. Levy (2006). Beyond Publius: Montesquieu, Liberal Republicanism and the Small-Republic Thesis. History of Political Thought 27 (1):50-90.
    The thesis that republicanism was only suited for small states was given its decisive eighteenth-century formulation by Montesquieu, who emphasized not only republics' need for homogeneity and virtue but also the difficulty of constraining military and executive power in large republics. Hume and Publius famously replaced small republics' virtue and homogeneity with large republics' plurality of contending factions. Even those who shared this turn to modern liberty, commerce and the accompanying heterogeneity of interests, however, did not all agree with or (...)
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  15. Meira Levinson, William A. Galston, Jacob T. Levy, Peter Levine, Robert K. Fullinwider & Mick Womersley (2005). Community Matters: Challenges to Civic Engagement in the 21st Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  16. Jacob T. Levy (2005). 8 Sexual Orientation, Exit and Refuge. In Avigail Eisenberg & Jeff Spinner-Halev (eds.), Minorities Within Minorities: Equality, Rights and Diversity. Cambridge University Press. 172.
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  17. Rainer Bauböck, Pierre Birnbaum, Stéphane Pierré-Caps, Gil Delannoi, Guy Hermet, Geneviève Koubi, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Wayne Norman, Patricia Savidan & Daniel Weinstock (2004). The Politics of Belonging: Nationalism, Liberalism, and Pluralism. Lexington Books.
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  18. Jacob T. Levy (2004). Liberal Jacobinism. Ethics 114 (2):318-336.
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  19. Samuel Scheffler, David Miller, Jeffrey Brand‐Ballard, Michael Ridge & Jacob T. Levy (2004). 10. Robert Nozick, Invariances: The Structure of the Objective World Robert Nozick, Invariances: The Structure of the Objective World (Pp. 364-368). [REVIEW] Ethics 114 (2).
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  20. Jacob T. Levy (2003). Liberalism's Divide, After Socialism and Before. Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (1):278-297.
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  21. Jacob T. Levy (2003). Language Rights, Literacy, and the Modern State. In Will Kymlicka & Alan Patten (eds.), Language Rights and Political Theory. Oup Oxford.
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  22. Jacob T. Levy (2002). Nenad Miscevic, Ed., Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict: Philosophical Perspectives:Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict: Philosophical Perspectives. Ethics 112 (4):843-846.
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  23. Jacob T. Levy (1996). The Multiculturalism of Fear. Critical Review 10 (2):271-283.
    Abstract The liberalism of fear urged by Judith Shklar emphasizes the dangers of political violence, cruelty, and humiliation. Those dangers clearly mark ethnic and cultural conflicts, so the liberalism of fear is an especially appropriate political ethic for an age marked by such conflicts. A multiculturalism of fear keeps its attention on those central political dangers while also noting that some kinds of cruelty and humiliation might not be appreciated without reference to the larger ethnic and cultural context, and that (...)
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