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Jacob L. Mey [7]Jacob Mey [3]
  1. Jacob L. Mey (2014). ZhaoHong Han and Teresa Cadierno (Eds), Linguistic Relativity in SLA: Thinking for Speaking. Pragmatics and Society 5 (1):156-163.
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  2. Jacob L. Mey (2011). Speech Acts in Context. In Anita Fetzer & Etsuko Oishi (eds.), Context and Contexts: Parts Meet Whole? John Benjamins Pub. Co.. 209--171.
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  3. Jacob Mey (2004). The Unspeakable Gift: Jouissance and Interdiction : A Reply to Shirley Sharon-Zisser. Pragmatics and Cognition 12 (1):93-104.
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  4. Barbara Gorayska & Jacob Mey (1996). Cognitive Technology: A New Deal in Human Computer Interaction. [REVIEW] AI and Society 10 (3-4):219-225.
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  5. Barbara Gorayska & Jacob L. Mey (1996). Murphy's Surfers Or: Where is the Green? Lure and Lore on the Internet. [REVIEW] AI and Society 10 (3-4):233-258.
    In this paper, we explore some characteristics of the Information Superhighway and the World Wide Web metaphors in the light of the current developments in information technology. We propose that these characteristics constitute a form of conceptual slippage (often in the form of ‘lexical leakage’), which helps us detect and predict the tacit impact that the currently available information delivery systems are having on human cognition. We argue that the particular language associated with these systems evolves as a direct result (...)
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  6. Jacob L. Mey (1996). Cognitive Technology ? Technological Cognition. AI and Society 10 (3-4):226-232.
    Technology, in order to be human, needs to be informed by a reflection on what it is to be a tool in ways appropriate to humans. This involves both an instrumental, appropriating aspect (‘I use this tool’) and a limiting, appropriated one (‘The tool uses me’).
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  7. Jacob L. Mey (1992). Adaptability: Reflections. [REVIEW] AI and Society 6 (2):180-185.
    The conclusion to be drawn from the preceding observations and theorizing should be that we must be very much aware of what has been called “technological functionalism” (Pieper, 1986:11). While functionalism as such is not bad, the moment it succumbs to mere structural technicality, the functions stop functioning: forced “adaptivity” takes the place of “adaptable” interaction.That this problem is not due to a primordial blame, to be attached to the computer, becomes clear when one compares the computerized environment to other (...)
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  8. Jacob L. Mey & Hiroshi Tamura (1992). Barriers to Communication in a Computer Age. AI and Society 6 (1):62-77.
    When people speak about “communication barriers”, what they usually think about are such things as the limitations set by human nature itself, or the constraints that are inherent in the tools we use for communicating. As an example of the first, consider the limited range of the naked human voice; for the second, we may think of the limitations imposed by such primitive communicative devices as the bonfire, the heliograph, or an old-fashioned megaphone.Our contribution draws attention to the fact that, (...)
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  9. Jacob Mey & Morris Zapp (1992). The Pragmatics of Semeiosis. In Maksim Stamenov (ed.), Current Advances in Semantic Theory. J. Benjamins Pub. Co.. 219--237.
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