7 found
Sort by:
  1. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2).
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jacquelyn N. Zita (1997). Introduction. Hypatia 12 (3):1-6.
  3. Jacquelyn N. Zita (1992). Jeffner Allen: A Lesbian Portrait. Hypatia 7 (4):6 - 13.
    This review essay covers the lesbian writing of philosopher Jeffner Allen, contrasting her fiercely separatist earlier work with her more recent experimental writing. A quest for a separate ontic space-defining difference qua Lesbian and consistently characterized by Allen as "the open"-links her earlier work with her more recent atonalities richly coded with ritual, myth, memory, and play.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jacquelyn N. Zita (1992). Male Lesbians and the Postmodernist Body. Hypatia 7 (4):106 - 127.
    This essay explores the criteria for lesbian identity attribution through the case study of "male lesbians": biological males who claim to be lesbians. I analyze such sex/gender identity attribution through the lens of postmodernism, which provides a workable theoretical framework for "male lesbian" identities. My conclusions explore the historicity and cultural constructedness of the body's sex/gender identities, revealing the limitations of both "the postmodernized body" and "the essentialized modernist body.".
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jacquelyn N. Zita (1990). Lesbian Angels & Other Matters. Hypatia 5 (1):133 - 139.
    In this commentary on Joyce Trebilcot's "Dyke Methods or Principles for the Discovery/Creation of the Withstanding," I discuss four areas of difficulty in Trebilcot's proposed methods: (1) an overly negative view of "the intention to persuade," (2) a tendency towards epistemological relativism and loss of cultural authorities, (3) a circularity in defining the proposed methods as dyke methods, and (4) a hint of repressive tolerance towards differences among lesbians by avoidance of painful confrontation involving those differences. Unlike Trebilcot, I make (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jacquelyn N. Zita (1988). A Review Essay. Hypatia 3 (1):157-168.
  7. Jacquelyn N. Zita (1988). The Premenstrual Syndrome: "Dis-Easing" the Female Cycle. Hypatia 3 (1):77 - 99.
    This paper reflects on masculinist biases affecting scientific research on the Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Masculinist bias is examined on the level of observation language and in the choice of explanatory frameworks. Such bias is found to be further reinforced by the social construction of "the clinical body" as an object of medical interrogation. Some of the political implications of the medicalization of women's premenstrual changes are also discussed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation