Search results for 'Jagdish Gandhi' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jagdish Gandhi, Vineeta Kamran & P. C. Bihari (2012). Quality and World Peace: City Montessori School, Lucknow. [REVIEW] AI and Society 27 (3):427-428.score: 240.0
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  2. John M. Koller, Mahatma Gandhi & Aurobindo Ghose, The Metaphysical Bases and Implications of Indian Social Ideals in Traditional India, Gandhi and Aurobindo.score: 180.0
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  3. Arun Gandhi (2011). Was Gandhi a “Pathological Altruist”? In Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan & David Sloan Wilson (eds.), Pathological Altruism. Oxford University Press. 246.score: 180.0
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  4. Stephen Hay & M. K. Gandhi (forthcoming). Anthologies Compiled From the Writings, Speeches, Letters, and Recorded Conversations of MK Gandhi. Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 180.0
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  5. Mahatma Gandhi (2005). All Men Are Brothers. Continuum.score: 60.0
    Includes selections from Gandhi's writings and speeches which express his thoughts, beliefs, and techniques.
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  6. Ramchandra Gandhi (1973). Injury, Harm, Damage, Pain, Etc. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (2):266-269.score: 30.0
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  7. Ramchandra Gandhi (1981). On Meriting Death. Philosophy East and West 31 (3):337-353.score: 30.0
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  8. Ramchandra Gandhi (1973). A False Lead in the Philosophy of Language. Philosophical Studies 24 (1):38 - 44.score: 30.0
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  9. Mahatma Gandhi (1978). Hindu Dharma. Orient Paperbacks.score: 30.0
    These are both critical as well as constructive, and thus inspire the reader to be a better Hindu and a better citizen of India and the world.
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  10. Ramchandra Gandhi (1972). Whitehead on the Distrust of Speculative Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3):389-414.score: 30.0
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  11. Balaganesh Gandhi & David A. Oakley (2005). Does 'Hypnosis' by Any Other Name Smell as Sweet? The Efficacy of 'Hypnotic' Inductions Depends on the Label 'Hypnosis'. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):304-315.score: 30.0
  12. A. Gandhi (2013). Non Violence in the Age of Terrorism. Journal of Human Values 19 (2):105-112.score: 30.0
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  13. T. Gandhi, P. Sinha, J. Santhosh & S. Anand (2008). Effects of Early Visual Impairment on Spatial Encoding of Complex Pattern in Human Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 10th International Conference on Cognitive Neuroscience. Doi: 10.3389/Conf. Neuro 9 (1.376).score: 30.0
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  14. Kishor Gandhi (ed.) (1990). The Odyssey of Science, Culture, and Consciousness. Abhinav Publications.score: 30.0
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  15. Nina Gandhi (2005). The Politics of Logic. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):31-50.score: 30.0
    This essay on the social history of logic discusses arguments in the programmatic writings of Carnap/Neurath, but especially in the widely read book by Lillian Lieber, Mits, Wits and Logic (1947), where Mits is the man in the street and Wits the woman in the street. It was seriously argued that the intense study of formal logic would create a more rational frame of mind and have many beneficial effects upon the social and political life. This arose from the conviction (...)
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  16. Takeshi Morimoto, Tejal K. Gandhi, Julie M. Fiskio, Andrew C. Seger, Joseph W. So, E. Francis Cook, Tsuguya Fukui & David W. Bates (2004). An Evaluation of Risk Factors for Adverse Drug Events Associated with Angiotensin‐Converting Enzyme Inhibitors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (4):499-509.score: 30.0
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  17. Virchand R. Gandhi (1896). India-Religious, Political, Social-of 1895. The Monist 7 (1):119-122.score: 30.0
  18. Leela Gandhi (2001). Other(s) Worlds: Mysticism and Radicalism at the Fin de Siècle. Critical Horizons 2 (2):227-253.score: 30.0
    Over time our understanding of the 'political' has been progressively shaped by the secular rational calculations of modern European political thought. This paper aims to critique these 'calculations' with reference to crucial moments of departure and flight within western philosophy itself. It concludes by reclaiming fin de siècle radicalism/philosophy as a forgotten instance of empirical-metaphysical hybridity: a form of politics or ethics capable of housing the imperatives of both desire and prayer.
     
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  19. Rajiv Gandhi (1990). Towards New Beginnings. In Kishor Gandhi (ed.), The Odyssey of Science, Culture, and Consciousness. Abhinav Publications. 1.score: 30.0
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  20. Saurab Bither & Sumir Gandhi (2011). An Audit of Patients Attending Outpatient Services of Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Christian Dental College, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry 1 (1):28.score: 30.0
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  21. Leela Gandhi (2010). Ahimsa and the Metaphysics of Hon-Violence. In J. Sharma A. Raguramaraju (ed.), Grounding Morality. Routledge. 160.score: 30.0
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  22. Kishor Gandhi (1973). Contemporary Relevance of Sri Aurobindo. Delhi,Vivek Pub. House.score: 30.0
     
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  23. Ramchandra Gandhi (1984). I Am Thou: Meditation on the Truth of India. I.P.Q. Publications, University of Poona.score: 30.0
     
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  24. Kishor Gandhi (ed.) (1984). Literature and the Evolution of Consciousness. Allied.score: 30.0
  25. Ramchandra Gandhi (ed.) (1983). Language, Tradition, and Modern Civilization. I.P.Q. Publications.score: 30.0
     
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  26. Virchand Raghavji Gandhi (1993). Religion and Philosophy of the Jainas. Jain International.score: 30.0
     
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  27. Ramchandra Gandhi (1994). Sītā's Kitchen: A Testimony of Faith and Inquiry. Wiley Eastern.score: 30.0
     
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  28. Kishor Gandhi (1965). Social Philosophy of Sri Aurobindo and the New Age. Pondicherry, Sri Aurobindo Society.score: 30.0
     
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  29. Ramchandra Gandhi (1976). The Availability of Religious Ideas. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 30.0
    THIS BOOK HAS TWO GENERAL THEMES. ONE IS THE AVAILABILITY OF RELIGIOUS IDEAS. IT IS ARGUED THAT A WHOLE RANGE OF RELIGIOUS IDEAS ARE AVAILABLE TO HUMAN BEINGS OUTSIDE A CONTEXT OF ACTUAL RELIGIOUS OR THEISTIC BELIEF. ADMISSION OF THESE IDEAS INTO ONE’S CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK DOES NOT COMMIT ONE TO RELIGIOUS BELIEF, BUT IT DOES EXPOSE THE UNINTELLIGIBILITY OF WHAT MIGHT BE CALLED THE ’IMMANENTIST’ VIEW OF THE WORLD. THE OTHER THEME OF THE BOOK IS THAT OF MORALITY. THE AUTHOR (...)
     
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  30. Leela Gandhi (2014). The Common Cause: Postcolonial Ethics and the Practice of Democracy, 1900-1955. University of Chicago Press.score: 30.0
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  31. Kishor Gandhi (ed.) (1983/1986). The Evolution of Consciousness. Paragon House.score: 30.0
  32. Ramchandra Gandhi (1973). Two Essays on Whitehead's Philosophic Approach. Indian Institute of Advanced Study.score: 30.0
  33. Nilotpala Gandhi (2006). The Meaning of the Word'peace'. In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan. 1--230.score: 30.0
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  34. Virchand Raghavji Gandhi (1970). The Systems of Indian Philosophy. Shri Mahavira Jain Vidyalaya.score: 30.0
     
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  35. Ramchandra Gandhi (1984). The Svaraj of India. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 11 (4):461.score: 30.0
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  36. Kishore Gandhi (1990). The Synchronization of Science, Culture and Consciousness: The Quest for New Epistemology. In Kishor Gandhi (ed.), The Odyssey of Science, Culture, and Consciousness. Abhinav Publications. 21.score: 30.0
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  37. Rabindranath Tagore, Mahatma Gandhi & Sri Aurobindo (1995). Sakunthaia Gangadharam Pattisapu. In S. Radhakrishnan, Rama Rao Pappu & S. S. (eds.), New Essays in the Philosophy of Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan. Sri Satguru Publications. 6--443.score: 30.0
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  38. Florence Burgat (2004). Non-Violence Towards Animals in the Thinking of Gandhi: The Problem of Animal Husbandry. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):223-248.score: 24.0
    The question of the imperatives induced by the Gandhian concept of non-violence towards animals is an issue that has been neglected by specialists on the thinking of the Mahatma. The aim of this article is to highlight the systematic – and significant – character of this particular aspect of his views on non-violence. The first part introduces the theoretical foundations of the duty of non-violence towards animals in general. Gandhi's critical interpretation of cow-protection, advocated by Hinduism, leads to a (...)
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  39. Stuart Gray & Thomas M. Hughes (forthcoming). Gandhi's Devotional Political Thought. Philosophy East and West.score: 24.0
    The political thought of Mohandas K. Gandhi has been increasingly used as a paradigmatic example of hybrid political thought that developed out of a cross-cultural dialogue of eastern and western influences. With a novel unpacking of this hybridity, this article focuses on the conceptual influences that Gandhi explicitly stressed in his autobiography and other writings, particularly the works of Leo Tolstoy and the Bhagavad Gītā. This new tracing of influence in the development of Gandhi’s thought alters the (...)
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  40. Ryan P. McLaughlin (2012). Non-Violence and Nonhumans: Foundations for Animal Welfare in the Thought of Mohandas Gandhi and Albert Schweitzer. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):678-704.score: 24.0
    This essay explores how the principles of ahimsa and reverence for life provide a foundation for animal welfare in the thought of Mohandas Gandhi and Albert Schweitzer, respectively. This exploration unfolds through a consideration of the contextual background of both thinkers, the scope of life to which they apply their respective principles, and both the ethical ramifications and limitations of this application. Within this common framework, the author delineates the striking commonalities and the significant disparities between Gandhi and (...)
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  41. Bindu Puri (2013). Freedom and the Dynamics of the Self and the 'Other'; Re-Constructing the Debate Between Tagore and Gandhi. Sophia 52 (2):335-357.score: 24.0
    Tagore and Gandhi shared a relationship across 26 years. They argued about many things including the means for the attainment of swaraj/freedom. In terms of this central concern with the nature of freedom they came fairly close to an issue that has perhaps dominated the (European) Enlightenment. For the Enlightenment has sought to clarify what is meant by individual freedom and attempted to secure such freedom to the individual. This article argues that the Tagore-Gandhi debate can perhaps be (...)
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  42. Manju Dhariwal, Ramesh C. Pradhan & Raghubir Sharan (2010). Engaging the Students of Technology in an Ethical Discourse in the Information Age: Thoughts of Wiener and Gandhi. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (3):62-71.score: 21.0
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  43. Nick Gier, Gandhi, Character Consequentialism, and the Virtue of Nonviolence.score: 18.0
    This paper has been extracted from a book manuscript that attempts to interpret Gandhi’s ethics of nonviolence ahimsa) in terms of virtue theory. The first section addresses the issue of virtue theory’s relationship to consequentialism and concludes that there is no way to avoid the fact that the virtues developed because of their consequences. Therefore, I will join Gandhi’s virtue ethics with P. J. Ivanhoe’s character consequentialism. Particularly significant in distinguishing utilitarianism from virtue theory is the relationship of (...)
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  44. Vinit Haksar (1976). Rawls and Gandhi on Civil Disobedience. Inquiry 19 (1-4):151 – 192.score: 18.0
    In the first section I compare and contrast Rawls's and Gandhi's views on civil disobedience as a form of persuasion. I discuss the difficulties facing such forms of civil disobedience; the argument that such forms of civil disobedience are redundant is examined and rejected. Some modifications of Rawls's theory are suggested regarding when civil disobedience is justified and what form it should take. Also, I argue, as against Rawls, that the Rawlsian State should, when that is necessary to prevent (...)
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  45. Douglas Allen (2007). Mahatma Gandhi on Violence and Peace Education. Philosophy East and West 57 (3):290-310.score: 18.0
    : Gandhi can serve as a valuable catalyst allowing us to rethink our philosophical positions on violence, nonviolence, and education. Especially insightful are Gandhi's formulations of the multidimensionality of violence, including educational violence, and the violence of the status quo. His peace education offers many possibilities for dealing with short-term violence, but its greatest strength is its long-term preventative education and socialization. Key to Gandhi's peace education are his ethical and ontological formulations of means-ends relations; the need (...)
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  46. Vinit Haksar (2012). Violence in a Spirit of Love: Gandhi and the Limits of Non-Violence. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):303-324.score: 18.0
    The paper considers how Mahatma Gandhi?s Law of Ahimsa (or non-violence) can be reconciled with the necessity of violence; some of the strategies that Gandhi adopts in response to this problem are critically examined. Gandhi was willing to use (outward) violence as an expedience (in the sense of necessity), but he was opposed to using non-violence as an expedience. There are two versions of Gandhi?s doctrine. He makes a distinction between outward violence and inner violence. Both (...)
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  47. Nick Gier, Gandhi and the Virtue of Nonviolence.score: 18.0
    The following essay is the main chapter of a book manuscript entitled “The Virtue of Non-Violence: from Gautama to Gandhi.” The book attempts to accomplish two principal goals: (1) to conceive of nonviolence from the standpoint of virtue ethics; and (2) to give Gandhi’s philosophy a Buddhist interpretation. My intent is not to foreclose on the possibility of a Hindu or Jain reading of Gandhi’s work; rather, I argue that there are some distinct advantages in thinking of (...)
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  48. Thomas Pantham (1983). Thinking with Mahatma Gandhi: Beyond Liberal Democracy. Political Theory 11 (2):165-188.score: 18.0
    Gandhi's case against the West looks... infinitely stronger than it looked, to us Westerners, thirty years ago.G. D. H. cole.
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  49. Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2003). Non-Violence and the Other a Composite Theory of Multiplism, Heterology and Heteronomy Drawn From Jainism and Gandhi. Angelaki 8 (3):3 – 22.score: 18.0
    (2003). Non-violence and the other A composite theory of multiplism, heterology and heteronomy drawn from jainism and gandhi. Angelaki: Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 3-22.
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  50. Johan Galtung (2011). Arne Naess, Peace and Gandhi. Inquiry 54 (1):31-41.score: 18.0
    The political ethics of Gandhi animated many of Arne Naess's philosophical projects, from argumentation theory to deep ecology. However, the value of Naess's own studies of Gandhi is less clear. This article focuses on the significance and utility of Naess's writings on Gandhi to the study and practice of peace. Naess's approach to Gandhi was distinctive; he attempted a systematic reconstruction of Gandhi, where the essence of Gandhi's action and speech was to be derived (...)
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